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    house
  • A building for human habitation, esp. one that is lived in by a family or small group of people
  • contain or cover; "This box houses the gears"
  • a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"
  • firm: the members of a business organization that owns or operates one or more establishments; "he worked for a brokerage house"
  • A family or family lineage, esp. a noble or royal one; a dynasty
  • The people living in such a building; a household

Staff Sgt. Aleya Robleto discusses a patient’s needs at the U.S. Army Reserve dental clinic in Mateare, Nicaragua
Staff Sgt. Aleya Robleto discusses a patient’s needs at the U.S. Army Reserve dental clinic in Mateare, Nicaragua
Staff Sgt. Aleya Robleto discusses a patient’s needs at the U.S. Army Reserve dental clinic in Mateare, Nicaragua. (Photo by Maj. Matt Lawrence, U.S. Army Reserve) Story: Nicaragua is hot, humid and the poorest country in Central America. The houses that line the trash-filled streets are built of cinderblocks and rusting tin. Overcrowded school buses weave through neighborhoods like race car drivers, windows down due to the lack of air conditioning. It’s April and the heat reaches 98-degrees. Storefronts sell just the basic needs of life. Scores of people walk to their destination, because they don’t have money for the bus, much less their own car. Despite all of this, they’re happy. They smile as the pass their neighbors. School children giggle as they run to the corner station in hopes that together, they have enough Cordobas for a Coca-Cola, a rare treat that costs the equivalent of 25 cents. It might be a culture shock to some Soldiers of the 307th Dental Company from Vallejo, Calif., but for one it’s all too familiar. Staff Sgt. Aleyda Robleto lives in Rodeo, Calif., but calls Granada, Nicaragua home. She knows what it’s like to go without food, sacrificing breakfast for school tuition. “It’s an investment,” her grandma told her. During school, she traded homework for food, offering to type papers or let people copy her test answers in exchange for their brown bag. She was an ‘A’ student, knowing the sacrifice her family was making so she could have a quality education. It wasn’t until she was 18 that she moved to the United States with her sister. “I hated it at first. I wanted to come home.” And she did, but it only took three months for her to realize she wasn’t going to get the education she desired, so she moved back to California and began a new chapter of her life. She joined the Army in 2000 as a medical supply specialist. It was a way to help pay for school, and coincidentally, a way to learn English. “The first month of basic training was very hard. Luckily in the Army, they give you demonstrations on whatever you do, so I would just do what I saw everyone else doing.” By the time she came home, she spoke fluent English and enrolled at San Francisco State University. She graduated in 2007 with a degree in linguistics, after serving a tour in Iraq. Since joining, she has become a patient administration specialist and works full-time for 2nd Medical Brigade, 807th Medical Command while she saves for her legal court translator license. In April, she jumped at the chance to visit her home country and help her native people. “I was so excited. I’ve always wanted to come back and do something. There’s so much to do and there’s so little for me to offer, besides my work and my willingness to come here.” She traveled to Mateare, Nicaragua, a town just 40 minutes from where she grew up, with the 307th Dental Company to set up a clinic for patients who couldn’t otherwise afford treatment. She spent her days talking to patients and making sure they had the correct paper work to receive the proper procedures. She said the Nicaraguans were excited to see her. “They’re so proud. When they talk to me, they say ‘Oh I talked to the American Nicaraguan Soldier.’ They all wanted to come to my table.” During the two weeks spent in Nicaragua, the 307th provided the equivalent of $821,000 of dental work and performed over 3,200 procedures, including cleanings, fillings, extractions, root canal surgeries, and dentures. Robleto didn’t have dental care growing up and knows the hardships upon the people of Nicaragua. “A lot of people go through pain, because they don’t have the money. Even if it’s only like $2.50 (about 50 Cordobas), they don’t have it. They’d rather buy food and have the pain.” She said when someone has a dental problem, the family has to save up to get it fixed, but by the time they have the money it’s usually too late to do anything except extract the tooth. “It’s expensive. A lot of people have to travel at least an hour to Managua for care, because the local clinic can only do very basic things.” Since she left Nicaragua, she’s tried to visit once a year. Robleto said she’s thankful for the opportunities America has given her, because she can now help her family and her people. In addition to volunteering for the opportunity in Nicaragua, she also sponsors two local teenagers, a girl in college and a boy in high school. She covers their tuition, books, uniforms and shoes so their parents only have to worry about food and a roof over their heads. She doesn’t give them a free ride, however, they have to earn it. “I’m a little bit strict. If they give me ‘A’s, I’ll give them whatever they need.” After a year of proving themselves in public school, she allowed them to choose their school for the following year. If their grades aren’t up to her standards, she’ll put them back in public school until they prove they’re determined and focused. “They hav
Staff Sgt. Aleya Robleto from Rodeo, Calif. explains the dental clinic process to a crowd of waiting Nicaraguans
Staff Sgt. Aleya Robleto from Rodeo, Calif. explains the dental clinic process to a crowd of waiting Nicaraguans
Staff Sgt. Aleya Robleto from Rodeo, Calif. explains the dental clinic process to a crowd of waiting Nicaraguans. The clinic treated over 1,200 patients over a period of ten days and performed over 3,200 dental procedures.(photo by Maj. Matt Lawrence, U.S. Army Reserve) Story: Nicaragua is hot, humid and the poorest country in Central America. The houses that line the trash-filled streets are built of cinderblocks and rusting tin. Overcrowded school buses weave through neighborhoods like race car drivers, windows down due to the lack of air conditioning. It’s April and the heat reaches 98-degrees. Storefronts sell just the basic needs of life. Scores of people walk to their destination, because they don’t have money for the bus, much less their own car. Despite all of this, they’re happy. They smile as the pass their neighbors. School children giggle as they run to the corner station in hopes that together, they have enough Cordobas for a Coca-Cola, a rare treat that costs the equivalent of 25 cents. It might be a culture shock to some Soldiers of the 307th Dental Company from Vallejo, Calif., but for one it’s all too familiar. Staff Sgt. Aleyda Robleto lives in Rodeo, Calif., but calls Granada, Nicaragua home. She knows what it’s like to go without food, sacrificing breakfast for school tuition. “It’s an investment,” her grandma told her. During school, she traded homework for food, offering to type papers or let people copy her test answers in exchange for their brown bag. She was an ‘A’ student, knowing the sacrifice her family was making so she could have a quality education. It wasn’t until she was 18 that she moved to the United States with her sister. “I hated it at first. I wanted to come home.” And she did, but it only took three months for her to realize she wasn’t going to get the education she desired, so she moved back to California and began a new chapter of her life. She joined the Army in 2000 as a medical supply specialist. It was a way to help pay for school, and coincidentally, a way to learn English. “The first month of basic training was very hard. Luckily in the Army, they give you demonstrations on whatever you do, so I would just do what I saw everyone else doing.” By the time she came home, she spoke fluent English and enrolled at San Francisco State University. She graduated in 2007 with a degree in linguistics, after serving a tour in Iraq. Since joining, she has become a patient administration specialist and works full-time for 2nd Medical Brigade, 807th Medical Command while she saves for her legal court translator license. In April, she jumped at the chance to visit her home country and help her native people. “I was so excited. I’ve always wanted to come back and do something. There’s so much to do and there’s so little for me to offer, besides my work and my willingness to come here.” She traveled to Mateare, Nicaragua, a town just 40 minutes from where she grew up, with the 307th Dental Company to set up a clinic for patients who couldn’t otherwise afford treatment. She spent her days talking to patients and making sure they had the correct paper work to receive the proper procedures. She said the Nicaraguans were excited to see her. “They’re so proud. When they talk to me, they say ‘Oh I talked to the American Nicaraguan Soldier.’ They all wanted to come to my table.” During the two weeks spent in Nicaragua, the 307th provided the equivalent of $821,000 of dental work and performed over 3,200 procedures, including cleanings, fillings, extractions, root canal surgeries, and dentures. Robleto didn’t have dental care growing up and knows the hardships upon the people of Nicaragua. “A lot of people go through pain, because they don’t have the money. Even if it’s only like $2.50 (about 50 Cordobas), they don’t have it. They’d rather buy food and have the pain.” She said when someone has a dental problem, the family has to save up to get it fixed, but by the time they have the money it’s usually too late to do anything except extract the tooth. “It’s expensive. A lot of people have to travel at least an hour to Managua for care, because the local clinic can only do very basic things.” Since she left Nicaragua, she’s tried to visit once a year. Robleto said she’s thankful for the opportunities America has given her, because she can now help her family and her people. In addition to volunteering for the opportunity in Nicaragua, she also sponsors two local teenagers, a girl in college and a boy in high school. She covers their tuition, books, uniforms and shoes so their parents only have to worry about food and a roof over their heads. She doesn’t give them a free ride, however, they have to earn it. “I’m a little bit strict. If they give me ‘A’s, I’ll give them whatever they need.” After a year of proving themselves in public school, she allowed them to choose their school for the following year. If their grades aren’t up to her st

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