HISTORY OF COOKING METHODS. COOKING METHODS

History of cooking methods. Mickey mouse cooking computer game. Red wine for cooking beef

History Of Cooking Methods


history of cooking methods
    history of
  • heres a brief explanation of the word *** and how it can be used in everyday life. enjoy!
  • ecology | evolutionary biology | geography | model organisms | molecular biology | paleontology
    cooking
  • Food that has been prepared in a particular way
  • The practice or skill of preparing food
  • the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
  • (cook) someone who cooks food
  • (cook) prepare a hot meal; "My husband doesn't cook"
  • The process of preparing food by heating it
    methods
  • (A Method) Return to Cookie Mountain is the third full-length album by the American rock group TV on the Radio.
  • A particular form of procedure for accomplishing or approaching something, esp. a systematic or established one
  • method acting: an acting technique introduced by Stanislavsky in which the actor recalls emotions or reactions from his or her own life and uses them to identify with the character being portrayed
  • Orderliness of thought or behavior; systematic planning or action
  • (method) a way of doing something, especially a systematic way; implies an orderly logical arrangement (usually in steps)

Graiguenamanagh (2)
Graiguenamanagh (2)
Most of the monastic houses which became famous, began with humble beginnings and a severe discipline, as Clairvaux, Citeaux, Hirschau, and the Chartreuse. The colonies were planted for the most part in lonely regions, places difficult of access, in valley or on mountain or in swamp. The Franciscans and Dominicans set a different example by going into the cities and to the haunts of population, howbeit also choosing the worst quarters. The beautiful names often assumed show the change which was expected to take place in the surroundings, such as Bright Valley or Clairvaux, Good Place or Bon Lieu, the Delights or Les Delices (near Bourges), Happy Meadow or Felix Pre, Crown of Heaven or Himmelskrone, Path to Heaven or Voie du Ciel. Walter Map, writing in the last part of the twelfth century, lingers on the fair names of the Cistercian convents, which, he says, "contain in themselves a divine and prophetic element, such as House of God, Gate of Salvation," etc. With wealth came the great abbeys of stone, exhibiting the highest architecture of the day. The establishments of Citeaux, Cluny, the Grande Chartreuse, and the great houses of Great Britain were on an elaborate scale. No pains or money were spared in their erection and equipment. Stained glass, sculpture, embroidery, rich vestments, were freely used. A well-ordered house had many parts, - chapel, refectory, calefactory, scriptorium for writing, locutorium for conversation, dormitory, infirmary, hospital. Not a single structure, but an aggregation of buildings, was required by the larger establishments. Cluny, in 1245, was able to accommodate, at the same time, the pope, the king of France, and the emperor of Constantinople, together with their retinues. Matthew Paris says Dunfermline Abbey, Scotland, was ample enough to entertain, at the same time, three sovereigns without inconvenience the one to the other. The latest conveniences were introduced into these houses, the latest news there retailed. A convent was, upon the whole, a pretty good place to be in, from the standpoint of worldly well-being. What the modern club house is to the city, that the mediaeval convent was apt to be, so far as material appointments went. In its vaults the rich deposited their valuables. To its protection the oppressed fled for refuge. There, as at Westminster, St. Denis, and Dunfermline, kings and princes chose to be buried. And there, while living, they were often glad to sojourn, as the most notable place of comfort and ease they could find on their journeys. The conventual establishment was intended to be a self-sufficient corporation, a sort of socialistic community doing all its own work and supplying all its own stuffs and food. The altruistic principle was supposed to rule. They had their orchards and fields, and owned their own cattle. Some of them gathered honey from their own hives, had the fattest fish ponds, sheared and spun their own wool, made their own wine, and brewed their own beer. In their best days the monks set a good example of thrift. The list of minor officials in a convent was complete, from the cellarer to look after the cooking and the chamberlain to look after the dress of the brethren, to the cantor to direct the singing and the sacristan to care for the church ornaments. In the eleventh century the custom was introduced of associating lay brethren with the monasteries, so that in all particulars these institutions might be completely independent. Nor was the convent always indifferent to the poor. But the tendency was for it to centre attention upon itself, rather than to seek the regeneration and prosperity of those outside its walls. Like many other earthly ideals, the ideal of peace, virtue, and happy contentment aimed at by the convent was not reached, or, if approached in the first moments of overflowing ardor, was soon forfeited. For the method of monasticism is radically wrong. Here and there the cloister was the "audience chamber of God." But it was well understood that convent walls did not of themselves make holy. As, before, Jerome, Gregory of Nyssa, and Augustine had borne testimony to that effect, so now also did different voices. Ivo of Chartres (d. 1116) condemns the monks who were filled with the leaven of pride and boast of their ascetic practices and refers to such passages as 1 Tim. 4:8 and Rom. 14:17. The solitudes of the mountains and forests, he says, will not make men holy, who do not carry with them rest of soul, the Sabbath of the heart, and elevation of mind. Peter of Cluny wrote to a hermit that his separation from the world would not profit unless he built a strong wall against evil in his own heart, and that wall was Christ the Saviour. Without this protection, retirement to solitude, mortifications of the body, and journeyings in distant lands, instead of availing, would bring temptations yet more violent. Every mode of life, lay and clerical, monastic and eremitic, has its own temptation
Chicago: United Center - Michael Jordan Statue
Chicago: United Center - Michael Jordan Statue
In late 1993, Bulls Chairman, Jerry Reinsdorf, directed team Vice President, Steve Schanwald, to conduct a search for a sculptor who could craft a statue as tribute to the greatest player in NBA history. In January, 1994 Schanwald hired the husband-wife team of Omri and Julie Rotblatt-Amrany of Highland Park, Illinois, to design and create a statue of the then retired Bulls superstar which would stand forever at the entrance to the United Center, the Bulls' new home, which was set to open in August of that same year. Schanwald sought a design which would be a realistic depiction of Jordan, illustrate the spectacular nature of his unique skill, and create an illusion of flight. The statue, unveiled before a national television audience by Larry King, Mr. Reinsdorf and Jordan himself, in a November 1, 1994 ceremony at which Michael Jordan's famous #23 was retired, sits on a 5-foot high black granite base inscribed with Mr. Jordan's basketball achievements, and the words, "The best there ever was. The best there ever will be." The statue itself measures 12 feet tall (17 feet from top to bottom) and weights 2,000 pounds. The statue was cast in bronze using the "lost wax" method at Art Casting of Illinois, a foundry in Oregon, Illinois. Working in secrecy, and putting in 16-hour days, 7 days a week for 4 months, the Amrany's finished work depicts Jordan soaring over an abstract entanglement of opponents, preparing to unleash one of his signature dunks. The airborne Jordan is attached to the base at just one point-the knee. Explore: Jun 18, 2006

history of cooking methods
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