Basic knight strategy
Basic knight strategy

"Knight forks are fun! The knight can attack two or more pieces at the same time. When the knight attacks two pieces at the same time, we call it a knight fork. An attack upon more than two pieces is called a "family fork."

Basic knight strategy

 

Knights belong in the middle of the board:

 

In the middle of the board, the knight has access to eight squares.

 

 

On the side of the board, the knight has access to only 4 squares. That's why we say that "a knight on the rim is dim."

 

 

In the corner of the board, the knight has access to only two squares. There's a poem for that too. A knight in the corner makes you a mourner.

 

 

Knights belong in the middle of the board, where the pawns can't attack it:

 

Yes, I know, it just got a bit more complicated, but you can see in the game below how easy it was for the white pawns to force the knight to keep moving. Black has moved just one piece, the knight, and meanwhile white has taken impressive control over the center of the board.

 

 

Much better to place the knight in "holes" in the opponent's pawn structure. In the following position, the knight would be very well placed in the hole marked with an "X" Note that there, the white pawns will not be able to attack or capture the knight, and from the hole, the knight helps to control eight squares. Can you safely manoeuver the knight to the hole in just three moves?

 

 

Knights can attack two pieces at the same time:

 

Knight forks are fun! As you can see in the following diagram, the knight can attack two or more pieces at the same time. When the knight attacks two pieces at the same time, we call it a knight fork. An attack upon more than two pieces is called a "family fork."

 

 

Here's a position from one of my games with black to move. As you can see, a white knight is attacking the black queen. If the Black queen moves forward one square (following the arrow), do you see how white can move the White knight to deliver a family fork?