ITALIAN WHOLESALE FURNITURE : WHOLESALE FURNITURE

Italian Wholesale Furniture : Quality Used Office Furniture : Furniture Legs Replacement

Italian Wholesale Furniture


italian wholesale furniture
    wholesale
  • Sell (goods) in large quantities at low prices to be retailed by others
  • at a wholesale price; "I can sell it to you wholesale"
  • sweeping: ignoring distinctions; "sweeping generalizations"; "wholesale destruction"
  • the selling of goods to merchants; usually in large quantities for resale to consumers
    furniture
  • Furniture + 2 is the most recent EP released by American post-hardcore band Fugazi. It was recorded in January and February 2001, the same time that the band was recording their last album, The Argument, and released in October 2001 on 7" and on CD.
  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
  • Large movable equipment, such as tables and chairs, used to make a house, office, or other space suitable for living or working
  • A person's habitual attitude, outlook, and way of thinking
  • Furniture is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above the ground, or to store things.
  • Small accessories or fittings for a particular use or piece of equipment
    italian
  • a native or inhabitant of Italy
  • the Romance language spoken in Italy
  • Of or relating to Italy, its people, or their language
  • of or pertaining to or characteristic of Italy or its people or culture or language; "Italian cooking"

Swift, Seaman & Co. Building
Swift, Seaman & Co. Building
Financial District, Manhattan Erected in 1857-58 for Emily Jones, a daughter of the late Isaac Jones, third president of Chemical Bank, the Swift, Seaman & Co. Building at 122 Chambers Street extends through the block to 52 Warren Street. It is a distinguished example of the mid-nineteenth-century store-and-loft buildings that comprised the Tribeca area of lower Manhattan, containing such wholesale and manufacturing businesses as drygoods and various branches of hardware. From 1858 to 1879, the building housed the saddlery hardware business of Swift, Seaman & Co. and its successors. Both facades of the five­story structure are similarly articulated and inspired by the Italian Renaissance palazzo. The stories above the base are clad in tan-colored Dorchester stone, prized in the second half of the nineteenth century by architects and stonecarvers for its color and durability. The building is embellished with round-and segmental-arched, molded surrounds, many of which are surmounted by ornately carved Rococo Revival style ornament. These carved details are extraordinary surviving elements of 1850s ornamentation. The building is surmounted by modillioned and bracketed metal cornices. The original cast-iron storefronts were replaced by the current stone-clad ground-story remodeling in 1921­ For nearly ninety years, this building continuously housed saddlery hardware, hardware. and saddlery/harness businesses. It remained in commercial use until 1980 when it was converted to apartments. Both the Chambers Street and Warren Street facades of the five-story Swift, Seaman & Co. Building are similarly articulated and incorporate architectural vocabulary inspired by the palazzo model then popular for store-and-loft buildings in New York City. The original storefronts (no longer extant) were cast iron, manufactured by Daniel D. Badger. The structure is surmounted by modillioned and bracketed metal cornices. The stories above the base are clad in tan-colored Dorchester stone, prized in the second half of the nineteenth century by architects and stone carvers for its color and durability." Unlike brownstone, it was a "freestone" without a pronounced stratification or grain and was thus less difficult and restrictive to work with. II The United States Economist & Dry Goods Reporter observed in 1856 that Dorchester stone "is in several prominent buildings in the city and is greatly admired."" The Swift. Seaman & Co. Building is a fairly early, and a significant surviving, example of the use of the material in New York City. Each facade is embellished with round-and segmental-arched, molded surrounds, many of which are surmounted by ornately carved Rococo Revival style ornament. Such detailing above the surrounds on fenestration was popular in New York City throughout the 1850s for commercial buildings and row houses. It provided an alternative, more decorative. variation on the palazzo model, or Italianate style, which often had simpler molded surrounds. This architectural usage appears to parallel the popularity of the Rococo Revival style in interior decoration and furniture at the time." Most of these commercial buildings, however, do not survive today, while on the surviving row houses the ornament has most of ten been shaved. One extant building with similar ornament (on the top story) is the stone-clad Arnold Constable & Co. store (1856, 1862), 307-311 Canal Street, located within the SoHo-Cast Iron Historic District." The carved details on the Swift, Seaman & Co. Building, consisting of cartouches, shells, foliate scrolls, fronds, and rosettes. are extraordinary surviving elements of 1850s ornamentation. - From the 2000 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report
italian air force
italian air force
an Italian air force plane just before landing at the the military airport of Volkel airbase, the Netherlands

italian wholesale furniture
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