DECORATIVE WALL KEY HOLDER. KEY HOLDER

DECORATIVE WALL KEY HOLDER. ROMAN CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS

Decorative Wall Key Holder


decorative wall key holder
    key holder
  • A person authorised to keep another person's key.
  • A nominated person who is able to operate the security system and has keys to the property. In the event of an alarm, the dispatched authorities will often request a key holder to meet them at the alarmed location so that they have access to investigate the alarm.
    decorative
  • Serving to make something look more attractive; ornamental
  • Relating to decoration
  • (decoratively) in a decorative manner; "used decoratively at Christmas"
  • cosmetic: serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"
  • (decorativeness) an appearance that serves to decorate and make something more attractive
    wall
  • A side of a building or room, typically forming part of the building's structure
  • A continuous vertical brick or stone structure that encloses or divides an area of land
  • an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"
  • anything that suggests a wall in structure or function or effect; "a wall of water"; "a wall of smoke"; "a wall of prejudice"; "negotiations ran into a brick wall"
  • surround with a wall in order to fortify
  • Any high vertical surface or facade, esp. one that is imposing in scale
decorative wall key holder - Hanging Hooks
Hanging Hooks Key Rack Fleur de Lis - Regal Art #5028
Hanging Hooks Key Rack Fleur de Lis - Regal Art #5028
This Hanging Hooks Key Rack Fleur de Lis - Regal Art #5028 will be at home in your office or home, bathroom, by your door, in your kitchen, your bedroom or guestroom. Matching other items in Regal's line you can incorporate these hooks into your unique decorating theme. Or just use separately as a great accent. These hooks are very sturdy: the smaller racks are perfect for keys, leashes, utensils and lighter weight items; the larger racks hold clothing towels, pots/pans, hats and heavier items; the individual hooks can be placed wherever a hook is handy and can be used for whatever. Just about any place you need hooks is the perfect place for these fun-themed hooks.

Regal Art & Gift is the leading manufacturer in the Gift & Garden Industry. Owners Bill and Audrey Costello started the company in 1992 by introducing unique decorative Home & Garden products. Over the past 17 years their exclusive quality product offerings and always-fresh designs have helped the company become the leader in this industry.

Size: 7 x 1.25 x 8H Inches -- Color: Metal

80% (11)
"Smoking for the Learned Man" exhibit case
"Smoking for the Learned Man" exhibit case
From William and Mary's own Nottoway Quarter tobacco, to the Tau Chi Literary Society's "large and curious smoking pipe," a cigarette holder decorated with (near-mascot) pugs, to a musical ashtray in William and Mary's green and gold, Swem Library's Special Collections Research Center holds documents and artifacts that reflect the history and changing fashions of tobacco in America. Students in the NIAHD Field School in Material Culture (HIST 491-03/591-03, Prof. Susan Kern) have curated an exhibition of tobacco objects from Swem’s collection. Come visit the exhibition, but remember...No Smoking Allowed! Smoking for the Learned Man In the 19th and early 20th centuries, many cigar advertisements targeted the learned man, the "man of brains." Cigar smoking became tied with a personal image of culture and refinement. This gentleman smoker projected himself as a true Renaissance man. Distinguished among his peers, he was well versed in the Classical tradition with its associated allusions and imagery. He contained the knowledge and education necessary for participation in literary societies, and he had the leisure time to attend cultural entertainments like the theater. This exhibit case, Smoking for the Learned Man, demonstrates how cigar paraphernalia and advertisements of the 19th and early 20th centuries added to and played off this image of the gentleman smoker as a cultured, Renaissance man. Reproduction of a Silk Playbill, 1892. Gift of Mrs. H. O. Sanders, 1947-1961. This silk playbill features the Shakespearean comedy “As You Like It” performed on April 23, 1892. Silk playbills were meant as souvenirs for special theatrical performances and were popular throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The playbill contains smoking advertisements that market elite brands of cigars and cigarettes to the wealthy theater audience. William Booth Taliaferro Papers, Mss. 65 T15.A66B Assorted Cigar Bands, Late 19th-Early 20th Centuries. Gift of Mrs. H. O. Sanders, 1947-1961. These ornamental paper bands encircled the ends of cigars. Their use is said to have evolved from the already common practice of gentleman smokers tying strips of paper around their cigars in order to keep their gloves clean. Considered a "luxury" and not a "necessity" by the U.S. tariff committee, these decorative bands also became a popular collector's item. Manufacturers even issued special thematic collector's bands. Cigar bands of the 18th and early 19th centuries exhibited fine craftsmanship in their elaborately embossed and gilded designs. Cigar bands were also used in folk art, ornamenting everyday objects such as plates, vases, and wall panels. William Booth Taliaferro Papers, Mss. 65 T15.A9 ? Smoking and Education The Tau Chi Literary Society was a literary fraternity operating at the College of William and Mary from 1839 to 1850 with anywhere from 5 to 20 student members active at any one time. The society held weekly meetings where they read personal compositions, planned public speeches, and conducted debates. The Greek Revival designs on the ceremonial smoking pot and golden TX pin emphasize the classical education present at institutions of higher learning in the early 19th century. In a speech at the Court House on Charter Day in 1840, the Tau Chi Society reaffirmed William and Mary as the location for the rebirth of educated statesmen that characterized ancient Greece and Rome. Smoking and the Theater Not only was the learned man a "man of brains," but he also engaged in the genteel cultural entertainment that was provided at the theater. Advertisements in theater programs, like the one for "Between the Acts" Cigars featured in the displayed silk playbill, catered to the elite audience of learned gentleman. Other cigar companies seeking this same consumer group also made the connection between their product and a sophisticated evening at the theater. The advertisement for Cortez Cigars associates the Cortez Cigar with the well known popular actor and stage manager, Sir Henry Irving. As the first man to be knighted for his work on stage, Sir Henry Irving delighted the Victorian public again and again with his romantic, historical plays. Creating a connection to theater and the European aristocracy, Sir Henry Irving's promotion of Cortez Cigars added a further degree of sophistication to the Cortez product. Ceremonial Smoking Pot of Tau Chi Literary Society, 1844. Transfer, March 1949. This large redware bowl features ten applied neoclassical designs of lions, women playing instruments, and cherubs in gardens and chariots. Sockets around the belly with holes bored through to the base of the pot fit reed pipe stems for twelve smokers. The bottom of the pot is stamped “BERGMANN” and dated 1844. An October 31, 1844, record from the minute book of the Tau Chi Literary Society documents the acquisition of this object as a gift: “U
"Smoking for the Learned Man" exhibit case
"Smoking for the Learned Man" exhibit case
From William and Mary's own Nottoway Quarter tobacco, to the Tau Chi Literary Society's "large and curious smoking pipe," a cigarette holder decorated with (near-mascot) pugs, to a musical ashtray in William and Mary's green and gold, Swem Library's Special Collections Research Center holds documents and artifacts that reflect the history and changing fashions of tobacco in America. Students in the NIAHD Field School in Material Culture (HIST 491-03/591-03, Prof. Susan Kern) have curated an exhibition of tobacco objects from Swem’s collection. Come visit the exhibition, but remember...No Smoking Allowed! Smoking for the Learned Man In the 19th and early 20th centuries, many cigar advertisements targeted the learned man, the "man of brains." Cigar smoking became tied with a personal image of culture and refinement. This gentleman smoker projected himself as a true Renaissance man. Distinguished among his peers, he was well versed in the Classical tradition with its associated allusions and imagery. He contained the knowledge and education necessary for participation in literary societies, and he had the leisure time to attend cultural entertainments like the theater. This exhibit case, Smoking for the Learned Man, demonstrates how cigar paraphernalia and advertisements of the 19th and early 20th centuries added to and played off this image of the gentleman smoker as a cultured, Renaissance man. Reproduction of a Silk Playbill, 1892. Gift of Mrs. H. O. Sanders, 1947-1961. This silk playbill features the Shakespearean comedy “As You Like It” performed on April 23, 1892. Silk playbills were meant as souvenirs for special theatrical performances and were popular throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The playbill contains smoking advertisements that market elite brands of cigars and cigarettes to the wealthy theater audience. William Booth Taliaferro Papers, Mss. 65 T15.A66B Assorted Cigar Bands, Late 19th-Early 20th Centuries. Gift of Mrs. H. O. Sanders, 1947-1961. These ornamental paper bands encircled the ends of cigars. Their use is said to have evolved from the already common practice of gentleman smokers tying strips of paper around their cigars in order to keep their gloves clean. Considered a "luxury" and not a "necessity" by the U.S. tariff committee, these decorative bands also became a popular collector's item. Manufacturers even issued special thematic collector's bands. Cigar bands of the 18th and early 19th centuries exhibited fine craftsmanship in their elaborately embossed and gilded designs. Cigar bands were also used in folk art, ornamenting everyday objects such as plates, vases, and wall panels. William Booth Taliaferro Papers, Mss. 65 T15.A9 ? Smoking and Education The Tau Chi Literary Society was a literary fraternity operating at the College of William and Mary from 1839 to 1850 with anywhere from 5 to 20 student members active at any one time. The society held weekly meetings where they read personal compositions, planned public speeches, and conducted debates. The Greek Revival designs on the ceremonial smoking pot and golden TX pin emphasize the classical education present at institutions of higher learning in the early 19th century. In a speech at the Court House on Charter Day in 1840, the Tau Chi Society reaffirmed William and Mary as the location for the rebirth of educated statesmen that characterized ancient Greece and Rome. Smoking and the Theater Not only was the learned man a "man of brains," but he also engaged in the genteel cultural entertainment that was provided at the theater. Advertisements in theater programs, like the one for "Between the Acts" Cigars featured in the displayed silk playbill, catered to the elite audience of learned gentleman. Other cigar companies seeking this same consumer group also made the connection between their product and a sophisticated evening at the theater. The advertisement for Cortez Cigars associates the Cortez Cigar with the well known popular actor and stage manager, Sir Henry Irving. As the first man to be knighted for his work on stage, Sir Henry Irving delighted the Victorian public again and again with his romantic, historical plays. Creating a connection to theater and the European aristocracy, Sir Henry Irving's promotion of Cortez Cigars added a further degree of sophistication to the Cortez product. Ceremonial Smoking Pot of Tau Chi Literary Society, 1844. Transfer, March 1949. This large redware bowl features ten applied neoclassical designs of lions, women playing instruments, and cherubs in gardens and chariots. Sockets around the belly with holes bored through to the base of the pot fit reed pipe stems for twelve smokers. The bottom of the pot is stamped “BERGMANN” and dated 1844. An October 31, 1844, record from the minute book of the Tau Chi Literary Society documents the acquisition of this object as a gift: “Under

decorative wall key holder
decorative wall key holder
Spectrum 71410 Scroll Wall-Mount Magazine Rack, Black
Store and display magazines and other reading materials with the decorative Scroll Wall Mount Magazine Rack. This magazine holder is ideal for a bathroom, waiting room, or office and has a contemporary style that transforms a messy pile of magazines, catalogs and newspapers into an accent piece in any d?cor. Spectrum is a company that does the small stuff great. Their items are made of better plastics, heavier steel, thicker powder coating, and stronger castings. Spectrum inspects every piece before it leaves their factory, so you know you'll always get top quality products. Measures 10-3/8" tall by 12-1/2" wide by 2-1/2" deep. Black.

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