Obits From the Chatsworth Plaindealer 1912

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Names are in Orange and dates in (Orange) have been added by me according to the publishing date of the Plaindealer. 


 


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1912
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JOHN KEMNITZ
JANUARY 12, 1912

While eating dinner on Sunday (Jan. 7) at the home of Henry Hornickle, in Germanville township, John Kemnitz, one of the well known residents of this corner of the county, choked, and before assistance could be rendered him, his death occurred.
John Kemnitz was born in Germanville township on July 4, 1873 and lived all his life in this corner of Livingston county. He was a son of Antone Kemnitz, deceased, and made his home with his brothers. when his death occurred he was staying with Henry Hornickle, while the later's wife was away from home. Mr. Kemnitz had been suffering with a severe cold, and having been afflicted with a bad case of diptheria when a boy, his throat was weak. He was an industrious man, and had many friends to whom the news of his sudden death came as a great shock.
Deceased is survived by five brothers, Frank, Antone, William, Joseph and Henry, four half brothers, Jacob, Ernest, George and Frederick, and his step mother, Mrs. Jesse Moore. 
The funeral services were held on Tuesday, at 1:30 o'clock, at the Germanville Lutheran church, and the remains were laid to rest in the Germanville cemetery. The coroner's jury returned a verdict of death resulting from chocking and strangling, resulting in appoplexy.

NOTE: Name spelling should be  Kemnetz



MRS. SAMUEL EBY
JANUARY 12, 1912

The many friends of Mrs. Samuel Eby, of Peoria, formerly a resident of Chatsworth, will be surprised and grieved to learn of her death which occurred on Tuesday (Jan. 9) night at St. Francis hospital in Peoria. Mrs. Eby fell and broke one of her legs on Friday, December 22. Just how the accident occurred is not known, as she was found in the kitchen of the Eby home in an unconscious condition. She was taken to the hospital and remained unconscious most of the time until her death. 
Deceased was fifty years of age, and is survived by her husband, one daughter, Mrs. Fred Norbitts, and one son, Andrew, all residents of Peoria. The family removed to Peoria from Chatsworth but a few years ago.
The funeral took place in Peoria today (Friday) and was attended by Mr. and Mrs. Perry Eby and J.A. Brammer, of Chatsworh township.


JOHN E. CRONIN
JANUARY 19, 1912

The death of John E. Cronin, of Charlotte township, occurred at the Cronin home north of this city on Wednesday (Jan.16) morning at 12:30 o'clock, from a complication of diseases. He had been very sick for several weeks, and pneumonia finally developed, which was the direct cause of his demise. 
John E. Cronin was born on November 19, 1867, at Pekin, Ill. He came to Charlotte township with his parents when a lad, and made his home there since. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Cronin preceded him in death, as did two brothers, George and William. 
Deceased was unmarried and his only surviving relative is his sister, Miss Mary, with whom he has made his home. She has the sincere sympathy of her many friends in her grief.
The funeral services were held this Friday morning at SS. Peter and Paul's church, Rev. W.J. Burke officiating, and the interment was at St. Patrick's cemetery. 


GEORGE R. STANFORD
JANUARY 19, 1912

The remains of George R. Stanford, of Little Rock, Ark., a former resident of this locality, passed through Forrest on Sunday evening, accompanied by his brother C.M. Stanford, of Rush Hill, Mo., en-route to East Florence, N.Y. for interment. At Forrest Frank Stanford joined his uncle and accompanied him to New York with the remains. 
George R. Stanford was a brother of L.B. Stanford, of Forrest, and of D.J. Stanford and W.S. Stanford, of Chatsworth. He resided here a number of years ago and worked for D.J. Stanford. He has been a railroad conductor for a good many years, running out of Little Rock, Ark., was unmarried, and is reported to have been quite well to do. He was 47 years of age.


MRS. MARY MONAHAN
JANUARY 26, 1912

The death of Mrs. Mary Monahan, which occurred on Monday  (Jan. 22)morning at eleven o'clock at her home in the north part of town, removes one of the early settlers of this corner of the county, and one of the best known and most highly respected women of this community. She had been ill for about two weeks with bronchial pneumonia. 
Mary Glinnen was born March 11, 1843, in Maryland, and before she was one year of age was taken to Ireland by her parents, James and Mary Glinnen. They returned to the United States in the winter of 1844 and came to Illinois, locating on a farm east of Pontiac, in Avoca township. On October 17, 1863, she was united in marriage with John Monahan, the ceremony taking place at Joliet. Mr. Monahan with his brother, Patrick, had located in Charlotte township in 1858, and following their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Monahan went to housekeeping north of where Chatsworth is now situated. Mr. Monahan's death occurred in 1900. Mrs. Monahan was the mother of nine children: Julia Anne, wife of Thomas Kinsella, of Grand Junction, Iowa; Marie Jane, deceased; Thomas Francis, Mathew Paul, John Dennis, Edward Alphonso, all residents of Charlotte; Miss Lena, who resided with her mother; Kate Agnes, wife of Frank Kaiser, of Chatsworth; and one son, John Joseph, who died in infancy. In addition to her children Mrs. Monahan is survived by two brothers, Matthew and Chris Glinnen, both of Fairbury. One brother, Dennis, died last April.
Mrs. Monahan was a woman of large physique, and after her husband's health failed took active charge of the work on their farm, looked after the work in a capable and businesslike manner, and added materially to the family's holdings. She was a good mother, an excellent neighbor and a woman held in the highest eesteem by all who knew her.
The funeral services were held at SS. Peter and Paul's church on Thursday morning at nine o'clock, and the interment was at St. Patrick's Cemetery.


SAMUEL PATTON
FEBRUARY 9, 1912

Samuel Patton, of the earliest residents of Chatsworth, who conducted the first blacksmith ship in this village, died at the Soldier's Home in Washington, D.C., on Saturday afternoon, February 3, at the advanced age of past 79 years. The remains arrived in Chatsworth on Wednesday morning, and the funeral services were held at the Chatsworth M.E. church on Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. L.J. Albert, of Piper City, assisted by Rev. V.A. Crumbaker, of this city. Interment at Chatsworth Cemetery. Samuel Patton was born in Brooke county, Va., Sept. 3, 1833. He located in Chatsworth in 1859 and engaged in the blacksmith business. In 1861 he was united in marriage with Miss Nellie Desmond, now a resident of Piper City. In 1862 he enlisted in Battery M. Artillery, and remained until the close of the Civil war. During his residence in Chatsworh, Mr. Patton invented and patented the corn husker, which was the original design of all corn huskers since manufactured. He had been an inmate of the National Soldiers Home at Washington for a number of years.


DORSEY INFANT
FEBRUARY 16, 1912

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence G. Dorsey have the deepest sympathy of their many friends in their bereavement, the death of their infant son, which occurred on Friday (Feb. 15) night at the Chatsworth sanitarium, at the age of about two days. Mrs. Dorsey's many friends are pleased to know that her condition is very favorable. 




MRS. BRIDGET WALSH
MARCH 1, 1912

Bridget Godfrey was born August 11, 1828, at Castle Dermot Kildare county, Ireland. At the age of eighteen she came to New York and resided on Staten Island, where she was married to James Walsh on February 14, 1848. In the fall of 1864 they came to Peoria county where they lived until moving to this vicinity in 1873. In 1892 they moved to the village of Chatsworth and there her life's partner for over sixty years passed to the Great Beyond on the 20th of December, 1909. Since then she has lived with her son, John, and daughter, Mrs. Maggie Duffy, south of Chatsworth.
Five children survive her namely; Mrs. Maggie Duffy, John W. and Joseph P., of Chatsworth; Mrs. James Fitzmaurice, of Piper City; and Harry J., of Chicago. Three girls and one boy preceded her in death. She is also survived by seven grandchildren and one great grandchild. 
"Grandma", as she was familiarly known, was beloved by all who knew her. She was a brave and patient sufferer for the last four months and God in his mercy and wisdom has called her to rest. Her memory will every live in the hearts of those she has left behind and their lives will be the better for the blessed privilege of having called her mother.
Those who attended the funeral from out of town were the following; Michael O'Neil, of El Paso; Wm. O'Neil, of Minneapolis; Edward and Bernard O'Neil, of Kentland, Ind.; Miss Fannie Power and Arthur render, of Peoria; Wm. Render, Wm. Fitzgerald and Mike Fitzgerald, of El Paso.


MRS. WILLIAM F. HERCULES
MARCH 15, 1912

Mrs. William F. Hercules, a former well known resident of this community, died at the family home near Pennville, Ind., on Friday (Mar. 8)  morning last at an early hour, death being the result of kidney trouble. The remains were brought here on Saturday evening and taken to the Eby home, north of town, the funeral services being held at the Chatsworth Baptist church on Sunday afternoon, Rev. Gunn officiating.
Mina J. Gordon was born at Pontiac, Ill., March 20, 1878. She was united in marriage with William f. Hercules at Chatsworth on September 29, 1897. She was the mother of four children, two having died in infancy. Those surviving are Alta, aged 12, and Adelbert, aged 11 years. In 1905 the family left Chatsworth moving to Paulding, Ohio, and in 1911 they moved to Pennville, Ind., where a home was purchased with the thought of good surroundings for their children, but in the midst of life the messenger of death came and bade the mother to another world.
She was converted at the age of thirteen and joined the Baptist church of Pontiac, later transferring her membership to the Chatsworth Baptist church. After going to Ohio and Indiana she affiliated herself with the M.E. church, there being no Baptist church there. 
She is survived by her husband, two children, her mother, Mrs. E.L. Gordon, of Pennville, Ind., grandfather, A.J. Eby, of Charlotte township, many other relatives and a host of friends, not only here but near Paulding and Pennville. Those who knew her best loved her most. The floral offerings were numerous and beautiful, and bore testimony of the esteem in which she was held by her friends, as did also the large attendance at the last obsequies. The interment was at Chatsworth cemetery beside the remains of her two children.
Those who attended the funeral from afar were: Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Reed, Mrs. C.L. Lee, Edward S. Snethen, J.W. Snethen, and Mrs. E. James, of Pontiac; J.A. Lee, of La Crosse, Ind.; S.S. Munro and Miss Ada Munro, of Saunemin; Samuel Eby, of Peoria. 


 


JOSEPH H. MCMAHON
MARCH 22, 1912

The death of Joseph H. McMahon occurred at the family residence in this city on Tuesday (Mar. 20) night, death bring the result of endocardis, inflamation of the interior lining of the heart, from which he had been a sufferer for many years. 
Joseph H. McMahon was born in Putnam county, Illinois, April 18, 1846. He was reared on his father's farm, and in 1862 enlisted in the 69th Ill. Vol. Infantry, and afterwards served in the 139th and the 47th regiments. He was mustered out at Selma, Alabama in 1866. He returned to Putman county and in 1868 came to Ford county. He farmed in Ford county until 1880 when he moved to Chatsworth township and resided south of this city until he retired from farming and moved into town about six years ago. 
Mr. McMahon was married in September 1870 to Elizabeth Hunt, of Melvin, who with five sons and three daughters survive him. The children are Harry, of this city; James, of Lostant; Frank, of Fairbury; John, of Cullom; Joseph,Jr., of Chicago; Mrs. Edna Roberts; Pearl, wife of B.V. Newman and Gladys, wife of Ross Baltz, all residing in and near Chatsworth.
Mr. McMahon was a man esteemed by all who knew him. He had filled many township offices and was an ardent republican in politics. 
The funeral services are being held this afternoon at the M.E. Church, Rev. V.A. Crumbaker officiating, and the interment will be at the Chatsworth Cemetery.


JACOB GERBRACHT
MARCH 22, 1912

One of the earliest residents of this community was called to the Great Beyond on Tuesday (Mar.20) night, when Jacob Gerbracht passed away at the home of his son, Henry, and family, after a lingering illness of several years. 
Jacob Gerbracht was born at Hessen, Darmstatt, Germany, August 5, 1825. He came to the United States at the age of 31 years landing at Castle Garden, N.Y., after spending 16 weeks on a sailing vessel making the voyage. He came directly to Illinois locating in Tazewell county where he worked on a farm for $7.00 a month. He moved to this county and located in Germanville township in 1863, and had since made his home in this locality. In March 1892 he left the farm and removed to his city, and had resided here since. He is survived by one daughter and two sons, Mrs. Anna Neading, Conrad Gerbracht and Henry Gerbracht, and one step-son, Adam Shafer, all residents of Chatsworth and immediate vicinity, 19 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren.
The funeral services will be held on Saturday, March 23, at ten o'clock at the home of his son, Henry Gerbracht and family, thence to the Germanville Lutheran church at one o'clock p.m., interment at the Germanville cemetery.

See photo here.


MRS. WILLIAM BAILEY
MARCH 22, 1912

On Thursday (Mar.21) morning at the family home in this city occurred the death of Mrs. William Bailey at the age of 61 years, 10 months and 1 day. She had been a resident of Chatsworth for about fifteen years, the family having come here from Dana, Ill. and having lived in Ohio previously. Both Mr. and Mrs. Bailey were natives of Ohio, and were married in that state before coming to Illinois. Deceased is survived by her husband; three sons, Eli, who resides in the southern part of the state, George and Sterling, of this city; one daughter, Jennie, wife of Otis Cady, of this city; and 11 grandchildren. The funeral services will be held at the Chatsworth Baptist church on Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, Rev. J. Harvey Gunn, officiating, and the interment will be in Chatsworth cemetery. 



KREBS INFANT
MARCH 22, 1912

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Krebs have the sympathy of their many friends in their bereavement, the death of their infant son, Howard Lewis, which occurred on Tuesday (Mar.19) evening. The child was born on Sunday, February 25, and had been a comfort and joy to the parents for a little over three weeks. The funeral services were held on Thursday afternoon, interment at the Chatsworth cemetery. 




HENRY RUPPEL
MARCH 29, 1912

The death of Henry Ruppel, which occurred on Sunday (Mar.24) at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Glabe, in this city, removes a man who had resided in this corner of the Livingston county for over a half a century. Death was due to old age, as Mr. Ruppel was 82 years old. 
Henry Ruppel was born in Neideraula, Germany, April 11, 1830. He came to the United States in 1850 and located near Peoria, Ill., and in 1860 came to Livingston county and located on a farm in Germanville township, south of Chatsworth, where he continued to reside until about a year ago, when he came to town and made his home with his daughter. In 1850 he was united in marriage with Gehia Berlet, and they had the rare privilege of celebrating their golden wedding. The union was blessed with eight children, four sons and four daughters. Only three survive, as follows: Mrs. Elizabeth Glabe, Mrs. Sebastian Glabe and Mrs. L.A. Walter, all residents of Chatsworth. He is also survived by 18 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren.
Mr. Ruppel was a substantial German citizen, of quiet and unpretentious disposition. He was a man universally esteemed, being honest, gentle and industrious.
The funeral services were held on Wednesday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the Chatsworth Evangelical church, Rev. Moehl officiating. and the remains were laid to rest in the Germanville cemetery.

See photo here.


JAMES PIERCY
MARCH 29, 1912

James Piercy was born at Nortnumberland, England, February 4, 1824, and died at the home of his son, John, at Waukee, Iowa, March 22, 1912, at the age of 88 years, 1 month and 18 days. He was united in marriage with Jennie Gordon on March 4, 1848, in England, and she preceded him in death on June 20, 1897. They were the parents of nine children, six of whom survive, as follows; James Piercy, Julesburg, Col.; Sarah Law, Julesburg, Col.; Mrs. Mary Hallam, Saunemin, Ill.; Isabelle Grove, Valley Junction, Iowa; John Piercy, Waukee, Iowa; William Piercy, Piper City, Ill. 
Mr. and Mrs. Piercy came to Illinois and located in Putnam county in the spring of 1848. They resided in and about Chatsworth for many years. He left this state about ten years ago and had since made his home in Iowa and Nebraska. The funeral services were held on Tuesday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the M. E. Church in Piper City, Rev. Jones officiating, and the burial was in the Brenton cemetery, a number of friends from Chatsworth and vicinity being in attendance.


GRANT PHIPPS
MAY 17, 1912

Grant Phipps passed away at the home of his father, E.J. Phipps in Lyman township, Ford county, southeast of Chatsworth at 12:30 o'clock on Thursday (May 16morning, following an illness dating from last fall, and after being operated upon several times without gaining relief. During corn husking last fall he slipped, receiving a slight injury, which he considered of little consequence, and he continued to husk corn the remainder of the season. During the winter the ailment grew worse, and during the past few weeks his condition became critical, finally culminating in his death. 
Grant Phipps was born on the farm in Lyman township were his death occurred. He was 18 years of age February 20, 1912, and had always lived in this community. He was a lad liked by all who knew him, and his death is the cause of universal sorrow. 
He is survived b his father, step-mother, four brothers, James, John, Phineas and Roy, and three sisters, Grace, Tice and Kate. 
The funeral services will be held at the family home on Saturday morning at ten o'clock, and the interment will be at the Chatsworth cemetery.


MRS. KATIE MCBRIDE MCELLIGOTT
MAY 17, 1912

The remains of the late Mrs. Katie McBride McElligott, of Kankakee, were brought to Chatsworth on Tuesday morning for interment in St. Patrick's cemetery, her death having occurred at her home in Kankakee on Sunday (May 12) morning, at the age of 53 years. 
Katie McBride lived in Chatsworth with her parents 35 years ago. When the Plaindealer editor  was a small boy, she assisted in caring for him, and no one but her own daughter more fully appreciated the beautiful qualities she possessed than does the writer of these lines.
Mrs. McElligott is survived by one daughter, Lillie; one sister, Mrs. Mary Lahey, who resides with her son, Sylvester, at Hammond, Ind.; and one brother, Michael, of Othello, Washington. 
The funeral services were held at Kankakee. Those who accompanied the remains here for interment were; Mr. and Mrs. Hugh McElligott, Ryan, Iowa; Mr. and Mrs. Harry Houser, Herscher; Sylvester and Jesse Lahey, of Hammond, Ind.; John Lahey, Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. John Bergan, Michael Fenton, and Mrs. Barrett, Kankakee; Mr. and Mrs. Carts and two daughters, Herscher; Mrs. Roach and two daughters, Mrs. Deaney, Valentine, George and Joseph Koerner, Cullom.

Note: The editor was Clarence Smith, son of James A. Smith.



MARIE (ROSENBOOM) SHINE
MAY 24, 1912

The many friends in Chatsworth of Mrs. Howard Shine, of Kankakee, formerly Miss Marie Rosenboom, of this city, were greatly shocked and deeply grieved the first of the week to learn of her death, which occurred on Monday (May 20). But a short time before word announcing the birth of a son to Mr. and Mrs. Shine caused rejoicing among their friends, but in giving the little new life, the young mother sacrificed her own. 
Marie Rosenboom was born at Emden, Germany, Jan. 14, 1890 and was the second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rosenboom. She came to the United States with her parents family in 1892, and they arrived in Chatsworth on May 14, 1892. She continued to make her home here until her marriage with Howard Shine, of Kankakee, on May 29, 1911, having lived in Kankakee since. She was a young woman most highly esteemed by a large circle of friends, and her early death was the more sad under the circumstances which it occurred. 
Deceased is survived by her husband; her infant son, Howard Andrew; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rosenboom, of this city; six sisters, Hilda, wife of Charles Bussard, of Strawn; Jeanette, wife of Jessie Haag of Cullom, Gertrude, Nellie, Anette and Louise, at home; three brothers, Robert, John and Henry, all of this city; and a host of friends.
The funeral services were held on Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Chatsworth Evangelical church, Rev. Koepp, pastor of the Charlotte Lutheran church officiating and the interment was in Chatsworth cemetery. Rev. Koepp delivered a most excellent discourse, speaking in both German and English, and the floral offerings of relatives and friends were beautiful, and spoke more plainly than could words, of the high esteem in which the departed was held. 


DAVID J. STANFORD
MAY 31, 1912

David J. Stanford, an old and highly respected early settler of this section of Livingston county, died at his recently acquired home in Monroe City, Missouri, on Wednesday morning, May 29. The remains were brought to this city on Thursday evening and the funeral will be held this Friday afternoon from the Baptist church, Rev. C.D. Eldridge, former pastor of the church, now of DeKalb, Ill., officiating, assisted by the past Rev. J. Harvey Gunn, and the interment will be in the Chatsworth cemetery. 
Mr. Stanford was born in Oneida County, N.Y., October 15, 1836, and grew to manhood on a farm. After receiving a common school education he taught school for a time, and then pursued a scientific course in Whitestown Seminary. In 1861 he came to Illinois. In the summer of 1862 he enlisted in Company B., One Hundred and Fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry at Ottawa, La Salle county, and served in the Army of the Cumberland, taking part in the battles of Stone River, Chicamauga and Missionary Ridge. On December 7, 1862, the brigade to which his regiment was attached was captured and after being paroled, was sent to Parole Camp at Columbus, Ohio. It was exchanged and subsequently stationed at Camp Douglas, Chicago on guard duty. Next it was ordered back to Tennessee. Mr. Stanford was discharged from service in the winter of 1862-63 at Chattanooga, Tenn., on account of physical disability. On returning to LaSalle county, Ill., he taught school for a while, and in 1866 bought land in Charlotte township, Livingston County, two miles northwest of Chatsworth following farming until 1878, although he taught his home district school and the Chatsworth school in 1868-69. The latter school then had four teachers and occupied two buildings. His associates in teaching were Misses Handerson and Hall, the latter a niece of the late M.H. Hall, and Miss Jennie Lucas.
Up to that period, Mr. Stanford had only practiced surveying locally, but in 1878 he was elected County surveyor and his services were in great demand. About the time three railroads were built across the country and a number of new towns were laid out, greatly increasing the duties devolving upon the surveyor's office. The Legislature had also passed a drainage law, establishing drainage districts, and as a result tile-draining was beginning to be in vogue. His work has also involved the laying out of city sewers, etc., and thus his thirty years in the county surveyorship was a busy period. In 1901 he moved from his farm to Chatsworth. 
The marriage of Mr. Stanford took place in LaSalle county on January 1, 1866, to Lydia F. Robinson, who was born near Portland, Maine, and was brought to LaSalle county by her parents when twelve years of age. The children resulting from this union were as follows; Alice L., wife of James Heald, who lives in Monroe County, Mo.; Albert D., of Mankato, Minn.; Fred C., formerly manager of the electric light plant at Chatsworth, and M. Myrtle, wife of Charles B. Curtis, of Monroe City, Mo. He is survived by the widow and all the children and numerous other relatives, among them being William S. Stanford, a brother, of this city.
Mr. Standford was a charter member of the Illinois State Society of Engineers and Surveyors, and for many years has been an expert in his profession. Politically, he was an old time republican, and always prominent and active in the affairs of his party. He was for a number of years president of the Chatsworth school board, and held other local offices. 


CARL WREDE
MAY 31, 1912

Carl Wrede, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wrede, of this city, met death on Thursday (May 30) evening by being run over by a train at Paxton. His body was so badly mangled that he could not be recognized, but through papers which he had in his pockets, his identity was established. He was walking on the railroad track and on account of his deafness he did not hear a fast train, which was coming behind him. 
For many years deceased worked at the harness trade in this city, having been employed by Edward Robbins. He left Chatsworth several years ago, and has been conducting a photograph gallery at Spring Valley, Ill., until a short time ago.
Carl. J. Wrede was 86 (should be 37) years of age and was born on August 19, 1875, in Chatsworth. He was a graduate of the Chatsworth High School, having graduated with the class of 1894. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wrede, of this city; three brothers, August, of Roberts; Alvin, living near Piper City; Henry, Woodstock, Ill.; and three sisters, Mrs. Louise Entwistle, of this city; Mrs. Matilda Jackson, of Vandalia, Mo.; Mrs. Bertha Pfeiffer, of Woodstock, Ill. The remains were brought to Chatsworth today and the funeral services will be held on Saturday, June 1, at the Evangelical church at 2 o'clock. 


ADAM SHAFER
JUNE 7, 1912

The death of Adam Shafer, which occurred at the family home on the south side of town on Monday (June 3) morning, at an early hour, removes from this community one of its best known and most highly esteemed German residents. For a number of years he had been in feeble health with stomach trouble, which the physicians lately diagnosed as cancer of the stomach, and which finally caused his demise, after much suffering which he bore with Christian fortitude. 
Adam Shafer was born in Kur, Hessen, Germany, September 21, 1846. He was reared by an aunt until about ten years of age, when he went to make his home with his stepfather and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Gerbracht. The family came to the United States in 1856 and located in Tazewell county, Illinois, where they remained until 1863 when they removed t what is now Germanville township, Livingston county, south of Chatsworth. At the age of 21 years Adam started out for himself and worked as a farm hand. In December, 1869, he was united in marriage with Miss Katherine Nading, also a native of Germany, and who preceded him in death, April 24, 1899, after being in delicate health for many years. The union was blessed with nine children, two of  whom died in infancy. Those surviving are Chris, of Paton, Iowa; Lizzie, wife of Henry Klehm; Katie, wife of Philip Koerner, Edward, Charles, Bert and Lena, all residents of Chatsworth and immediate vicinity, except Bert who has been in California for his health. He is also survived by two step brothers, Conrad and Henry Gerbracht, and one step sister, Mrs. John Nading, who lives near Thawville; and 17 grandchildren.
Adam Shafer was highly esteemed, being a man whose word was as good as his bond, and although he started with nothing but his hands and habits of industry and honesty, he had acquired a competency of this world's goods. For many years the family lived on his farm, three miles south of Chatsworth. Four years ago he came to Chatsworth to reside, but had never been able to enjoy the comforts which his life of industry has provided, as his health had been very poor, and he had submitted to an operation in the hope of securing relief. 
At the age of 21 years Mr. Shafer was converted during the labors of Rev. A. Gackley, and united with the Evangelical Association. For many years he was a member and energetic worker of the Germanville congregation, but since about 19800 he has been associated with the Chatsworth society, and he peacefully passed away in the full hope of a better life.

See photo here.


ANDREW JACKSON EBY
JUNE 7, 1912

Tuesday (June 4) afternoon shortly after three o'clock, following a protracted illness at the advanced age of 82 years. 
Andrew Jackson Eby was born in Perry county, Ohio, July 18, 1830, and continued to reside there until 1863 when he came to Illinois. On July 30, 1853 he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Cooperrider, also of Perry county, Ohio. In 1863 they came to Illinois, locating near Lacon, in Marshall county. They made their home there until 1883 when they removed to Livingston county, and took up their abode on the farm in Charlotte township, which has since been the family home. 
Mr. and Mrs. Eby were the parents of ten children, two daughters having died when small. Those surviving are Noah, of Mundon, Kan.; Elizabeth, wife of Landrum Gordon, of Pennville, Ind.; Samuel, of Peoria; John Allen, of Peoria; Andrew, of Charlotte township; James, of Chatsworth; Perry, of Charlotte township; Elmira, wife of Albert Brammer, of Charlotte township. He is also survived by one sister, Mrs. Martha Hartman, of Columbus Grove, Ohio, who is here in attendance at the funeral.
Mrs. Eby departed this life on June 27, 1905. Both Mr. and Mrs. Eby united with the Lutheran church in 1863 and had always retained their membership with that denomination, and attended worship when health and circumstances would permit.
Mr. Eby was a quiet, unpretentious man, honest and industrious and the devotion of his children during his last sickness is the strongest evidence of his worth of character. 
The funeral services were held this Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Chatsworth Baptist church, Rev. J. Harvey Gunn, officiating, and the remains were interred beside those of Mrs. Eby in the Chatsworth cemetery.


MARGARET (MORGANSTERN) SCHODER
JUNE 14, 1912

Mrs. Margaret Schoder, a resident of Sullivan township for 43 years, died on Friday (June 7) morning last at an early hour at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mary Koerner, in Cullom, at the age of past 79 years. 
Margaret Morganstern was a native of Bavaria, Germany, and came to the United States at the age of 22 years, accompanied by her mother and four sisters. In 1856, at Peru, Ill. she was united in marriage with John Simon Schoder. They lived there three years , then moved to Marshall county. In 1869 they came to Livingston county and located on a farm four miles west of Cullom. Mrs. Schoder was the mother of nine children, seven surviving as follows; John, of Chatsworth; Mrs. John Koestner, Duncombe, Ia.; Mrs. Barbara Trost, Frank and Joseph Schoder, Mrs. Daniel Goodrich and Mrs. Mary Koerner, Cullom. In addition to her children she is survived by one sister, one brother, 28 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.
The funeral services were held at the Cullom Catholic church on Sunday morning and the remains were interred in St. Patrick's cemetery, south west of Chatsworth, beside those of her husband. 


JOHN SULLIVAN, SR.
JUNE 28, 1912

John Sullivan died on Sunday (June 24) morning at Alexian Brothers' hospital, Chicago, where he was operated upon by Dr. L.E. Schmidt on Saturday, June 22. He had been ailing for about 3 years, but his strong courage kept him up until about three weeks ago when his illness became serious. His death was a great shock to all who knew him. Mr. Sullivan was a man of strong character and a loyal member of the Catholic church, also a member of the Knights of Columbus. He was born July 3, 1842 at County Cork, Ireland and came to New York, where he married Ellen McElivee, and later moved to Sciota, Ill., where she died in 1872, leaving three children, Mary Ellen, who died at the age of 19, John F. of Hamilton, Mont,. and Julia of New York City. In 1873 he was united in marriage with Mrs. Mary McSparitt. He moved to Chatsworth in 1892 where he has since made his home. He was employed by the T.P. & W. for 36 years, resigning his position about 8 years ago. 
The funeral services were held on Wednesday at 10 o'clock at SS. Peter and Paul's church,  witnessed by a large assembly of friends. Requiem mass was celebrated by Rev. Burke, who delivered a beautiful sermon. 
He is survived by his wife and six children, namely; John F. of Hamilton, Mont.; Julia, of New York City; Neal, of Sullivan, Ill.; Mrs. Martin Kerrins and Mrs. Ross Haberkorn, Chatsworth; Mrs. John Bergan, Piper City. 
Among those from away who attended the funeral were the following; Mrs. William Hood and son, of Bushnell, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. Whalin, Geneseo, Ill.; John Lavery, South Dakota; Mrs. John Mahoney and two daughters, Peoria, Ill.; Miss Mary Martin, Canton; Miss White, Macomb, Ill; Richard Shanon, Peoria; Mr. and Mrs. James Conners, Fairbury. 


JACOB REHM
JULY 5, 1912

The death of Jacob Rehm, one of the pioneers of this corner of Livingston county, and one of the wealthiest men of this community, occurred on Monday (July 1) morning shortly after six o'clock at his home on East Maple street, death being the result of a general breaking of the physical forces. 
Jacob Rehm was born September 6, 1830 at Neiderahia, Hessen Castle, Germany. He came to the United States and directly to Peoria, Ill., arriving at that city November 26, 1844, and went to Tazewell county the same day. He was united in marriage at Peoria in 1854 with Marie Anna Grisbaum. They resided in Tazewell county for about three years, coming to this vicinity in 1857. For many years the family home was on a farm southeast of Chatsworth, but in 1891 he retired from the farm and moved into Chatsworth where he had since made his home.
Mr. and Mrs. Rehm were the parents of ten children, five of whom, with the mother, survive. They are Ellen, wife of William Opperman, of Piper City; Maggie, wife of Charles Opperman, of Vicksburg, Miss.; John, who is unmarried and lives in South America; Amelia, wife of Mat. Madison, of Absorkee, Mont.; Charles, who is married and lives at Absorokee, Mont. He also has 26 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. 
The funeral services were held on Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock at the Chatsworth M.E. church, Rev. V.A. Crumbaker officiating, and the remains were interred in the Chatsworth Cemetery. 


MRS. MARY MARTIN
JULY 5, 1912

Mrs. Mary Jane Martin, of El Paso, for years a resident of Chatsworth, died at her home in El Paso on Wednesday (July1) morning at about nine o'clock, death being the result of heart trouble from which she had suffered for many years. 
Deceased was born in Rueselville, Ohio, September 23, 1833. She was married on February 8, 1854, to James Harvey Martin, who preceded her in death January 8, 1892. Mr. and Mrs. Martin came to Illinois soon after their marriage. Eight children were born to the union, five of whom survive, as follows: Mrs. Ella Reed, Medical Lake, Wash.; Mrs. John Perry, North Yakami, Wash.; Mrs. Charles Falck, Kankakee; Cyrus and Albert of El Paso. 
Mrs. Martin was a member of the Presbyterian church for many years and was active in the organization during her residence in Chatsworth. She was a woman most highly respected, and the assistance she rendered the poor and needy made her one loved by everyone. She left Chatsworth a number of years ago, and has since made her home at El Paso.
The funeral services were held this morning at El Paso, and the remains were brought to this city on the afternoon train for interment beside those of her husband in the Chatsworth cemetery. 


MRS. CLEMENTINE HABERKORN
JULY 12, 1912

Mrs. Clementine Haberkorn, a resident of this section of Illinois since the early fifties and a citizen of Chatsworth since 1865, passed quietly away at the family home on North fourth street on Tuesday (July 9) evening, following protracted affliction with cancer. 
Clementine Weinand was born in the province of Prussia, Germany, October 9, 1833. She came to the United States in the early fifties, and located at Panola, Woodford county, Illinois. She was united in marriage with Erasmus Haberkorn at St. Joseph's church in Peoria in 1857. Four children were born to the union, one daughter, Minnie, having died at the age of 18 years, about thirty-five years ago, having been an invalid all of her life. Those surviving are Louis Jl, Mary, wife of Gus; Frederrick and Ross, all residents of Chatsworth. The family came to Chatsworth in 1865 and the family home has been in the village since that time. For over forty years the family resided in the house where Mrs. Haberkorn's death occurred.
In addition t her children Mrs. Haberkorn is survived by one brother, Theodore Weinand, of Charlotte township, one sister, Mrs. Mary Mette, of Chatsworth, and three grandchildren.  
The funeral services were held at SS. Peter and Paul's church on Thursday morning at nine o'clock, Rev. W.J. Burke officiating, and the interment was in St. Patrick's cemetery beside the remains of her husband. 
Although Mrs. Haberkorn led a quiet home life, she was a woman who had a large circle of friends, being of a noble disposition and motherly temperament, and her demise will be the cause of sorrow to all who knew her.

See photo here.


MRS. MARTHA LUTESON
JULY 12, 1912

The death of Mrs. Martha Luteson occurred at her late home in Germanville township on Monday (July 8) evening, death being the result of heart trouble.  
Martha Hallaman was born in Ostfriesland, Germany, May 25, 1827, and was past 85 years of age at the time of her death. She came to the United States in 1848 and in 1852 was united in marriage with John H. Luteson at Peoria, Ill. The union was blessed with eleven children, nine surviving. The children were as follows: Margaret, deceased; Thomas, of Iowa; Dora, wife of George Leggate, of Iowa; Ressy, of Iowa; Tena, wife of Thomas Askew, of Charlotte; Margaretha, at home; Henry, of Iowa; Johanna, wife of Henry Gerbracht; Herman, at home; William, deceased; and John, also of Chatsworth. Mrs. Luteson is also survived by 24 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren.
At the age of fourteen years she united with the German Lutheran church and she _________ her connection with that organization to the end. She was a true Christian, a good wife and a kind and loving mother. 
The funeral services were held at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the Evangelical church, Rev. Koepp, of Charlotte, officiating, a short service being held at the home at 12:30. The interment was in the Chatsworth cemetery.

See photo here.


LAGOAR HARMON
JULY 19, 1912

A most terrible accident occurred this morning at the home of John Quinn, in Germanville township , when his nephew, LaGoar Harmon, 12 years old, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Harmon of Rensselaer, Ind., who was visiting at the home of his uncle, having arrived Wednesday, was thrown from and horse and killed. the accident occurred shortly after seven o'clock, and the boy died from the injuries her received, death taking place at nine o'clock. After being thrown from the horse the unfortunate lad was dragged by his foot catching in the saddle stirrup.
LaGoar Harmon is the eldest of five children of Mrs. and Mrs. Louis F. Harmon. The grief stricken parents were notified of the terrible accident and Mr. Harmon arrived here on the eleven o'clock train and was taken to the home of Mr. Quinn in an automobile. Both Mr. and Mrs. Harmon were former residents of this corner of Livingston county. The father is the son of Amiel Harmon, of Pontiac, who for many years resided on a farm southwest of Chatsworth, in the vicinity of Strawn. The mother is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. Quinn, of this city, but left this community before her parents moved into town from their farm, southeast of Chatsworth. The have hosts of friends in this community, who extend their hearfelt sympathy in their great grief. 

From the July 26, 1912 issue:
The funeral of the late LaGoar Harmon, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Harmon of Rensselaer, Ind., who met his death on Friday morning at the home of his uncle, John Quinn, in Germanville township, by being thrown from a horse and dragged, was held on Sunday afternoon at SS. Peter and Paul's church, Rev. W.J. Burke officiating. The capacity of the church was insufficient to accommodate all who attended the funeral, may being unable to gain admittance. Requiem high mass was celebrated at 10 o'clock in the morning, six alter boys from Rensselaer serving on the alter. they were Paul Healey, Carl Eiglesbaugh, John Kellener, Galord Remley, Fred Thomas and Nicholas Krull. The interment was at St. Patrick's cemetery. 




LEMNA INFANT
AUGUST 9, 1912

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Lemna have the deepest sympathy of their many friends in their great sorrow, the death of their infant son, Edward William, which occurred at their home on Monday (Aug.5) evening. The little boy lived but nine days following his birth, being afflicted with internal spasms. The interment took place on Tuesday afternoon at St. Patrick's cemetery. 



MRS. MATILDA C. CUNNINGTON
AUGUST 16, 1912

Mrs. Matilda C. Cunnington, relict of Thomas Cunnington, died on Tuesday (Aug.13) at the home of her son, William H. Cunnington, in this city, following a protracted illness of several months duration. 
Matilda C. Turpitt was born in Cambridgeshire, England, December 23, 1837. In 1851 she came to the United States with her parents and located at Washington, Illinois. On December 16, 1858, she was united in marriage with Thomas Cunnington, and in the spring of 1861 they moved to a farm in Charlotte township, north of Chatsworth. They continued to reside in Charlotte until 1904 when they moved into Chatsworth. Mr. Cunnington's death occurred in this village August 27, 1907, since which time Mrs. Cunnington had made her home with her sons and granddaughter. Mrs. Cunnington was the mother of three children, one daughter, Anna Elizabeth Askew, having preceded her in death. Those surviving are two sons, Alvin T., of Charlotte township, and William H., of this city. She is also survived by five grandchildren, one great grandchild, one brother, Timothy T. Turpitt, of Clarksville, Iowa, and a host of friends. When an infant she was baptized in the Church of England, and later was confirmed in the same faith. In 1855 she united with the Methodist church at Washington, Ill., later transferring her membership to the Chatsworth church. Mrs. Cunnington was a loving wife and mother, and a true friend and neighbor.
The funeral services were held on Thursday afternoon at two o'clock at the M.E. Church, Rev. Crumbaker officiating, and the interment was at Chatsworth cemetery. 
The following from away attended the funeral; Mr. Yale and daughter, Miss Edith, of Peoria; J.C. Askew, of Bloomington; Mrs. George Harper, of Forrest; J.Q. Puffer, of Chicago. 


MRS. VALENTINE (ANNA) WURMNEST
AUGUST 30, 1912
 
The death of Mrs. Valentine Wurmnest, one of the oldest women in this locality, occurred at the home of her son, George, and family , in this city, on Saturday evening, aged past (sic) 81 years, death being the result of old age, her last illness being of but a few days duration. 
Anna Willis was born in Neieraula, Gries Herschfeldt, Kure Hessen (sic), Germany, July 15, 1831. In 1856, she was united in marriage with Valentine Wurmnest, and they came to America in 186(?)4, accompanied by their two daughters, and located in Germanville township, south of Chatsworth. They continued to reside there until about four weeks ago, when they moved to this city to make their home with their son and family.
Mrs. Wurmnest was the mother of six children, as follows; Anna Martha, wife of Henry Berlett, who died last fall; Marie, wife of Nicholas Hornickel, of Germanville township; George of Chatsworth; John of Kankakee; Bertha, wife of Henry Brantz, who died nine years ago, and Christina, who died when a young lady.
Mrs. Wurmnest is survived by her aged husband, two sons, one daughter, 48(?) grandchildren and 13(?) great-grandchildren. 
The funeral services were held on Tuesday morning at the German Evangelical church, Rev. Koepp, of Charlotte, and Rev. Hoffeld(?) of Melvin, officiating. The pall bearers were six grandsons, namely: John Wurmnest, Valentine Wurmnest, William Wurmnest, Valentine Brantz, Jacob Hornickel and Edward Berlett. There were many beautiful floral offerings, and the interment took place in the Germanville cemetery.
Among those away were the following; Arthur Trotter, of Anchor; Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Zahn, of Roberts; Mr. and Mrs. Henry Lang, of Pontiac; Adam Weppler, of Gilman. 
 
See her photo here.
Note: A contributor says the town of birth  should read-Niederaula, Kreis Hersfeld, Kurhessen.





WILLIAM LIBBY
SEPTEMBER 6, 1912

William Libby, for many years a resident southwest of Chatsworth, near Healey and one of the earlier residents of this locality, but who left here a number of years ago, and had since resided in Kankakee, died at his home in that city on Wednesday. the following was taken from the Kankakee Democrat of September 4: 
William Libby who for many years has been a resident of the county, died this morning at his home on So. Washington Avenue, after a long illness of several months caused by stomach trouble and later an attack of typhoid fever.
Mr. Libby was a man seventy years of age and a member of Whipple Post G.A.R. For many years he was officer of the day and each Memorial day headed the column of veterans in their march.
He served during the civil war as a member of a New Jersey battery and after the war came to Illinois, where he has since resided. He is survived by a wife and two son, Harry and George, who live in Texas and who are expected to arrive tomorrow to complete arrangements for the funeral services which will be announced later. The members of the G.A.R. will participate in the services. 



ANTONE KEMNETZ
SEPTEMBER 27,1912

Read story here.



MRS. MARY SHAUGHNESSY
OCTOBER 4, 1912

On Tuesday morning shortly after five o'clock, at the family home in Chatsworth occurred the death of Mrs. Mary Shaughnessy, relict of Thomas Shaughnessy. For the past twelve years she has been a great sufferer from asthma, which was the direct cause of her death. 
Mary Cummins was born in county Clair, village of Kil Rusk, Ireland, on November 1, 1844, being 67 years, 11 months and 2 days of age at the time of her death. She came to the United States with her parents when five years of age and located in Joliet, where she grew to womanhood. On August 15, 1861 she was united in marriage with Thomas Shaughnessy and from Joliet they moved to Chicago in 1868. They lived there until 1872 when they came to this vicinity and settled on a farm north of Piper City where they resided until 1899, when they removed to Chatsworth, where the family home has since been. Mrs. Shaughnessy was the mother of twelve children, her husband and one daughter preceded her in death. She is survived by seven daughters and four sons as follows: Mr. John Benn, of Peoria; Mrs. Mary Elder, of Chicago; Mrs. William Kurtenbach, of Chatsworth; Mrs. D.J. Kelly of St. James, Minn.; Mrs. W.R. Trimble, of Chicago; Mrs. James Bergan,Jr., of Chatsworth; John and Charles, of Piper City; Thomas, of Pontiac, and James of Cabery.
The funeral services will be held on Saturday morning at ten o'clock at SS. Peter and Paul's church. 

OCTOBER 11, 1912
The funeral of the late Mrs. Mary Shaughnessy which was held on Saturday morning last at SS. Peter and Paul's church, was largely attended by relatives and friends of deceased. Rev. W.J. Burke officiated, and the remains were laid to rest in St. Patrick's cemetery. 
Mrs. Shaughnessy was a woman universally respected and loved by all who knew her, and the bereaved relatives have the deepest sympathy of their many friends. 


HENRY WURZBERGER
OCTOBER 4, 1912

See story here.


MRS. GEORGE KETCHUM
OCTOBER 18, 1912

Mrs. Sarah Ketchum relict of George Ketchum, and for many years a resident of this township, died on Tuesday (Oct.8) of last week at the home of her son, David, at Gilman, at the advanced age of 87 years. She came to Gilman about two weeks ago from Missouri. She had made her home with her son George, until his death several months ago at Rensselaer. She had been in feeble health, but her death was not expected. 
Mrs. Ketchum is survived by two sons, David, of Gilman, and another who resides in Wyoming. short funeral services were held on Wednesday at the home of David Ketchum, in Gilman, Rev. McWhorten, pastor of the Gilman Presbyterian church officiating, and the remains were taken to Rensselaer, Ind., for interment beside those of Mr. Ketchum. Mrs. Ketchum has many friends among the older residents of Chatsworth and vicinity to whom the news of her death will cause feelings of sorrow, as she was universally liked.


MARTIN KUEFFNER
OCTOBER 25, 1912

Martin Kueffner, whose death occurred in this city on Friday afternoon last, October 18, at 1:30 o'clock from general debility, was 87 years and 9 months of age. He had been ailing for about a month, and on Sunday previous to his death was taken with a sinking spell, from which he never rallied. 
Martin Kueffner was born in Kindenbeyern, in Unterlinach, Wurzberg, on January 29, 1825. He was drafted for the German army and served during the years from 1847 to 1853. In 1853 he received an honorable discharge, and coming to America, the same year settled in Chicago, where he was employed for a short time. From there he went to Franklin Grove, Ill., and worked for two years at the blacksmith trade. He was married in 1855 to Veronica Shott, and shortly afterward they moved to Ashton, Lee county, Ill. He worked at his trade there for four years and in 1859 traded the shop for a quarter section of land in Pramer county, Iowa, and farmed there until 1867, when he sold the farm and bought 80 acres near Mendota, Ill. Two years later he came to Livingston county and bought 160 acres just across the line in Ford county, later acquiring three more eighties adjoining in his county. Here he made his home until the death of his wife, which occurred in 1894. After her death he made his home with his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Christian Kratz. In 1903 the latter moved from the farm to Chatsworth and Mr. Kueffner came with them to the north side of town, where he resided until the time of his death.
Besides the above mentioned daughter there were three children, one of whom, Katherine, died in childhood, and William and Charles, both of whom reside in Chatsworth. He is also survived by eight grandchildren and one great-granddaughter. 
The funeral services which were held at SS. Peter and Paul's church on Sunday afternoon at two o'clock were conducted by the Pastor, Rev. W.J. Burke. The attendance was large and a long cortege followed the remains to St. Patrick's cemetery where the remains were interred. Among those from a distance who attended the funeral were the following; Mrs. George Full and son, Leo, of Mendota; Frank Kueffner, of Waverly, Iowa; John and Robert McDonald, Edward Haley and Miss Lillian Geary, all of Ottawa; Mrs. Julia Brady and daughter, of Cullom; Dr. and Mrs. E.J. Kelly and little daughter, of Gary, Ind.; Henry, Charles and George Mels, of Saunemin; Jos. Meis, of Roberts.

See photo here.


HENRY ROSENBOOM
NOVEMBER 15, 1912

The people of this city and vicinity were greatly shocked on Tuesday (Nov. 12) to learn of the death of Henry Rosenboom, which occurred at the family home in the west part of town at about ten o'clock that morning from the result of an accident the evening previous. Mr. Rosenboom was going into the left of his barn to throw down feed for his cow when his hand slipped off the ladder and he fell backward. The lantern he was carrying caught fire and he extinguished it, went into the house and sat and read for a time, and then walked with his son to the I.C. tracks, and returned home. He complained of pain in his side and a physician was called, and found a couple of ribs broken. His injury was dressed and during the night he went to sleep. On Tuesday morning he failed to rouse, and appeared partially paralyzed. Physicians were called and their conclusions were to the effect that he had suffered the rupture of a small blood vessel at the base of the brain, which caused slow paralysis and finally death. 
Henry Rosenboom was born in Westerhausen, Germany, June 16, 1856. He was united in marriage with Marie Deboor, in Germany, about 32 years ago. In the spring of 1892 with their six children, Mr. and Mrs. Rosenboom came to America and have since made their home in Chatsworth. They were the parents of eleven children, one having died in Germany, and Marie, Mrs. Howard Shine, having died in Kankakee less than a year ago. Those surviving are the following; John, of this city; Hilda, wife of Charles Bussard, of Strawn; Robert and Henry, of this city; Jeanette, wife of Jesse Haag, of Cullom; Gertrude, Nellie, Annette and Louise, all at home. One grandchild also survives. The grief stricken family have the deepest sympathy of their many friends.
The funeral services were held on Thursday afternoon at two o'clock at the Evangelical church, Rev. H. Koepp, of Charlotte, officiating and the interment was at Chatsworth cemetery. 

See photo here.


OLTMAN VOSS
NOVEMBER 15, 1912

The funeral of the late Oltman Voss, of Charlotte, whose sudden death at this home in Charlotte township on Friday (Nov. 8) morning last, was mentioned in last weeks issue of the Plaindealer, was held on Sunday morning at the Charlotte Evangelical church at 10:30 o'clock, interment being made at the Chatsworth cemetery. The services were conducted by Revs. S. W. Moehl and Jerry Behrns. 
Oltman Voss was born on March 28, 1842, in Howerfehn, Ostfriesland, Germany, and he was 70 years, 7 months and 10 days of age at the time of his death. At the age of 26 years he came to America and located in the vicinity of Charlotte, and had lived in that neighborhood until the time of his death, being one of the most prominent German farmers of this corner of Livingston county. In 1870 he was united in marriage with Antje DeBuhr. Ten children were born to the union, three having preceded him in death. Those surviving are Annie, wife of Benjamin Saathoff, of Bronaugh, Mo.; Ollie, wife of William Flessner, of Charlotte; Katie, wife of Teese Flessner, of Charlotte; Lena, wife of Agga Herren, of Sullivan township; Barbara, at home; Millie, wife of Henry Flessner, Jr., of Sullivan township; Louis, at home.
Mr. Voss united with the Evangelical church a number of years ago and was a member of the Charlotte congregation at the time of his death. He was interested in the work of the church, was a faithful husband and father, an excellent neighbor, and was possessed of a cheerful disposition and liberal nature. 
In addition to his wife, six daughters and one son, he leaves nineteen grandchildren, two sisters; other relatives and a host of friends to mourn the departure of a man universally esteemed. 

See photo here.


JOHN L. SAATHOFF
NOVEMBER 15, 1912

The death of John L. Saathoff, of Charlotte township, occurred on Thursday morning, November 14, at about nine o'clock, following an extended illness with stomach trouble. For over a week his condition had been such that his life was despaired of. 
John L. Saathoff was born March 27, 1839, in Schirum, Germany. On July 20, 1861 he was united in marriage with Sadie Leinemann. Nine children were born to the union, five having died in infancy. In March 1885 the family came to the United States, and Mr. Saathoff had been a resident of Charlotte township since his arrival to this country.
The four surviving children are all sons, namely, John, Bernhard and Albert, all residing at Bronaugh, Mo., and Frank, who resides in Charlotte township. Deceased is also survived by fifteen grandchildren. Mr. Saathoff was a man esteemed by his friends, of a retiring disposition, and of a temperment which caused him to spend most of his time at home. 
The funeral services will be held on Sunday morning at the Charlotte Lutheran church, leaving the home at 9:30 o'clock, the services at the church being announced for ten o'clock. 


NELLIE KURTENBACH
DECEMBER 13, 1912

Deep feelings of sorrow and gloom were cast over the many friends of the family by the death of Nellie Kurtenbach, one of the twin daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Kurtenbach, which occurred on Sunday (Dec. 8) evening at the parents' home in the north part of town, the result of kidney trouble with which she had been afflicted for some time. 
Nellie Kurtenbach was born on a farm south of Chatsworth on April 22, 1897, being one of twin sisters. She spent most of her life in the country, moving into Chatsworth with her parents about a year ago. She is survived by her parents, three sisters and four brothers, one brother and two sisters having preceded her in death. The surviving sisters and brothers are Mary Ellen, wife of George Watson, Catherine, Josephine, her twin sister, John, Owen, Peter and Edward, all residents of Chatsworth and vicinity, except John, who resides at Moorehead, Minn. Those who preceded her in death were William, Margaret, wife of James Swannick, and Anna.
The funeral services were held on Wednesday morning at SS. Peter and Paul's church, Father W.J. Burke officiating, and the remains were laid to rest in St. Patrick's cemetery. The grief stricken family have the deepest sympathy of their many friends in their sorrow. 
Among those from away who attended the funeral wee the members of the family, Miss Sadie Todd, of Chicago; Mrs. Peter Reising and son, Albert, of Waterloo, Iowa. 


WILLIAM SHOLS
DECEMBER 27, 1912

William Shols, a resident of Chatworth vicinity since 1862, passed away Thursday (Dec. 26) morning at the home of his son, E. Ross Shols, in the north part of town, at the advanced age of 82 years. 
William Shols was born in Prussia, Olesburg, Germany, February 21, 1830. He came to America in 1854 and located at Panola, Woodford county, where he resided for eight years. During his residence there he was united in marriage with Mrs. Fredericka Hanna. In 1862 they moved to a farm in Charlotte township, northeast of Chatsworth, where the family resided until 1892 when Mr. and Mrs. Shols retired from farm life, and came to Chatsworth to reside. Mrs. Shols passed to the other world on August 16, 1896, since which time Mr. Shols had made his home with his children. Deceased leaves to mourn his death three daughters, two sons, and one step-son,viz., Mrs. A. Grosenbach, Mrs. J. Grosenbach and Mrs. Bert Harmon, Louis, Erasmus (Ross), and William Hanna all residents of Chatsworth and vicinity. He also leaves one brother and one sister residing in Germany, twenty-five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.
He united with the Evangelical church in 1877 and has always remained a consistent member, and was a man who was esteemed by a large circle of friends, being highly honorable.
The funeral services will be held on Saturday afternoon at one-thirty o'clock at the Chatsworth Evangelical church, leaving the residence of E.R. Shols at one o'clock.