News & Announcements

WEDNESDAY LENTEN SERIES AT TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH

posted Feb 19, 2017, 7:07 PM by CCPJ News

Trinity Episcopal Church is hosting a series of Wednesday evening programs during Lent.

After a soup supper, we will watch a podcast, “Faith and Race”—an interview series designed to help churches of all colors host constructive dialogue about faith, race, and the church.

For 5 Wednesdays in Lent, starting March 8:

                        5:45pm  Soup Supper

                        6:45pm  Podcast and Discussion

.  The invitation is to all interested persons. 

Trinity is located at 1118 Preston Ave., with parking behind the church and on the street.

If you have questions or would like more info please contact Pastor Cass Bailey at 293-3157 or cass@pastorcass.com.

 

MEMORIAL TO BILL ANDERSON

posted Feb 19, 2017, 7:04 PM by CCPJ News

Last year Charlottesville lost another “drum major for justice.”  Bill was involved in peace, reconciliation, and justice work in Charlottesville and around the world.  He was the president of the Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice for many years. 

Bill was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church and Trinity will be honoring Bill’s life with a memorial seating wall that will be a part of the renovation of the church’s backyard into a play area and outdoor worship space.  The church has received a gift toward this effort but needs an additional $10,000.  If you would like to help remember Bill Anderson in this way, you are invited to make a memorial contribution.  No contribution is too small.

Contributions may be sent to:

Trinity Episcopal Church

1118 Preston Avenue

Charlottesville, VA 22903

 

If you have questions or would like more info please contact Pastor Cass Bailey at 293-3157 or cass@pastorcass.com.

Good Riddance to Robert E. Lee

posted Feb 9, 2017, 9:41 AM by David Swanson

Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, the city of Charlottesville, Va., city council has voted to remove an imposing statue of Robert E. Lee (and the horse he never rode in on) from Lee Park, and to rename and redesign the park.

The statue of this non-Charlottesvillian had been put up in a whites-only park during the 1920s at the whim of an extremely wealthy and racist individual. So, for a representative government to vote, following a very public deliberative process with voluminous and diverse input from city residents is -- if nothing else -- a step toward democracy.

I think it's much more as well. There are two issues at stake here, neither of them dead issues from the past. One is race. The other is war.

Following the vote of City Council, two Republican candidates for governor Corey Stewart and Denver Riggleman declared their outrage. "You cannot revise history. Only tyrants attempt to erase history. This is tantamount to denouncing your own heritage. I will do whatever I need to, both now and as governor, to stop this historical vandalism. We must fight to protect Virginia’s heritage," said Stewart. "This continued assault from Democrats on Virginia's history and heritage is unacceptable. As governor, I will protect the monuments of our heritage, but not just of the Civil War, mind you. . . . Not only are they standing in conflict with a number of Virginia's laws, but they are spitting in the face of veterans of every conflict — no reminder of any sacrifice by any veteran of any conflict should be torn down by the liberal thought police," said Riggleman.

Now, Charlottesville has been here for centuries. It has very few public monuments, virtually all of them to war makers. There's George Rogers Clark on horseback setting off to participate in genocide. There are Lewis and Clark exploring, with Sacagawea kneeling beside them like a dog. There are the giant equestrian statues of Robert E. Lee and also Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, plus the traditional generic Confederate soldier. There's the monument to murdering 6 million Southeast Asians in the Vietnam War. There are a couple of statues at UVA, one of Thomas Jefferson, one of a pilot who died in a war. And that's about it. So, virtually all of Charlottesville's history, good and bad and indifferent, is missing.

Where are all the great academics and artists and civil rights activists and environmentalists and performers and poets and suffragettes and abolitionists and athletes? Where, for that matter, is Queen Charlotte herself (long rumored, accurately or not, to have had African ancestry)? Where is the history of the native Americans who lived here without wrecking the earth's climate? Where is the history of education, of industry, of slavery, of segregation, of advocacy for peace, of sister-city relationships, of welcoming refugees? Where are women, children, doctors, nurses, business people, celebrities, the homeless? Where are either the police or the protesters? Where are fire fighters? Where are street musicians? Where's the Dave Matthews Band? Where's Julian Bond? Where's Edgar Allan Poe? Where's William Faulkner? Where's Georgia O'Keefe? One could go on forever.

Claims of "erasing history" are ludicrous. Choosing to glorify and memorialize some little bits of history is all that is ever done when monuments are added, removed, or swapped out for others -- or when they're left standing. Most of history will always remain unmemorialized in our public spaces. Adding new memorials while leaving Lee and Jackson in place would still amount to supporting what Lee and Jackson monuments communicate. And the decision to leave Jackson there does just that. It communicates primarily two things: racism and war. Apart from the artistry of the sculptures, apart from the personalities of the dead soldiers, these are statements of racism and war. And it matters.

A country that can make someone like Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III its attorney general has an ongoing struggle with racism. Symbols that have stood for racism for decades, symbols of a war fought for the right to expand slavery, must be set aside if we are to move forward.

A country that empowers people like Steve Bannon has a problem with the limitation of history to wars. Bannon claims that history goes through cycles, each one opened by a worse war than the one before, with a new one just around the corner. (And if history won't oblige, Bannon hopes to do his bit to facilitate the supposedly inevitable.)

Obligatory tangent for partisan readers: the leading expander of militarism during the past eight years, needless to say, has been a gentleman named Barack Obama.

Most of Charlottesville's history has not been war. There is nothing inevitable or natural or glorious about war. The vast majority of U.S. wars have no Charlottesville memorials. The entirety of local and U.S. efforts for peace have no public recognition in Charlottesville. Some are proposing that redesigned parks include some indication of aspirations and struggle for peace. That, I think, would be progress.

Workshop on whiteness and racial justice

posted Jan 11, 2017, 7:44 PM by CCPJ News

Thursday, Jan. 12, 7-9pm: Visiting Professor from VCU to lead Workshop
SURJ Charlottesville (Standing Up for Racial Justice) presents  Archana A. Pathak, Ph.D of VCU who will lead a workshop on whiteness and racial justice, approaching the question: "Why do we need to talk about whiteness when it comes to racial justice?"
Where: Thomas Jefferson Memorial Church (717 Rugby Rd, Charlottesville, VA 22903)
The discussion will be geared toward understanding white privilege in racial justice, where folks can learn about, understand and bridge the differences and connections between white and non-white experiences with and around racism.
Archana A. Pathak, Ph.D. (University of Oklahoma, 1998) is a post-colonialist feminist scholar activist who examines issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, nationality, and scientific imperialism from a social justice perspective. Academically trained in Intercultural Communication and qualitative research methodologies, she utilizes autoethnography to explore the ways in which we tell ourselves and each other who we are. She has also served as the President of the Board of The Conciliation Project, a not for profit social justice theater organization that addresses issues of racism and oppression.
For more information, email SURJCville@gmail.com .

Now More Than Ever: Stand for Peace in Charlottesville

posted Nov 15, 2016, 7:20 AM by David Swanson

Here's a proposal backed by RootsAction.org, WorldBeyondWar.org, Pax Christi Charlottesville, Amnesty International Charlottesville, the Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice, and 257 people who have signed this petition: http://bit.ly/cvillepeacepole

Charlottesville, Virginia, has the potential to be a leader for peace at home and abroad. Our city council in recent years passed resolutions against the war on Iraq, against threatening Iran, against drones, and in favor of moving resources from wasteful and deadly military spending to human and environmental needs. Other cities and towns followed Charlottesville's lead on some of these measures. Our voices were heard in Richmond and in Washington.

We now need to be a voice for peace and nonviolence more than ever. Wearing a safety pin is a wonderful way to communicate that one is a safe person not inclined toward bigotry or violence. But we need something more visible as well.

Charlottesville's monuments to wars, including the Native American genocide, the defense of slavery, and the slaughter of 3.8 million Vietnamese, dominate public space. Charlottesville's support for peace is nowhere visible on the public landscape.

Charlottesville has four sister cities, and signs indicating them are visible in Charlottesville. But the motto of Sister Cities International, "Peace Through People," is nowhere to be found. There is no location set aside to celebrate these relationships, as there could be in combination with a peace pole.

Put a Peace Pole in Charlottesville

A peace pole is of course just one option. Any public memorial to efforts for peace would work.

A peace pole is a popular means of expressing a desire for peace around the world, including in the United States, where peace poles are found in public plazas and parks in many locations.

One idea would be to have 6 sides including English, Spanish, and the languages of Cville Sister Cities: Italian, French, Bulgarian, and one of the many languages from Ghana. Or 8 sides with some left blank to be filled in later.

Please sign the petition so that we can deliver it to Charlottesville City Council. Please share it widely.

A Soldier's Life

posted Nov 15, 2016, 6:24 AM by David Swanson   [ updated Nov 15, 2016, 7:22 AM ]

Put a Peace Pole in Charlottesville

posted Jun 20, 2016, 10:33 AM by David Swanson   [ updated Jun 20, 2016, 12:03 PM ]

To sign this petition to Charlottesville City Council, click here.

Set aside 1 square foot of space in a prominent public place, on the Downtown Mall or in a park, where a peace pole can be erected.

A peace pole is a popular means of expressing a desire for peace around the world, including in the United States, where peace poles are found in public plazas and parks in many locations: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peace_pole

A peace pole can be purchased for $200 with "May Peace Prevail on Earth" written on four sides in four chosen languages: http://stores.bigwaterhosting.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=peacepoles&Category_Code=peace_poles

Charlottesville's monuments to wars, including the Native American genocide, the defense of slavery, and the slaughter of 3.8 million Vietnamese, dominate public space. Removing them would be ideal.

An easier method of quickly displaying our city's support for peace would be to create a peace pole. Charlottesville's city council has spoken up repeatedly over the years for peace, for reduced military spending, for transition to peaceful industries, and for a halt to particular wars. But a visitor to Charlottesville cannot observe any of that anywhere on the landscape.

Charlottesville has four sister cities, and signs indicating them are visible in Charlottesville. But the motto of Sister Cities International, "Peace Through People," is nowhere to be found. There is no location set aside to celebrate these relationships, as there could be in combination with a peace pole.

Please send this petition to everyone you know in Charlottesville, Va.: http://bit.ly/cvillepeacepole

We will deliver the petition to Charlottesville City Council on a date to be set in future.<--break->


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