Announcements

One City Is Following Through on Protests of Confederate Monuments

posted Aug 11, 2016, 6:20 PM by David Swanson

Charlottesville is a diverse, enlightened, and progressive college town in Virginia with its public spaces dominated by war memorials, in particular memorials to Confederate soldiers not from Charlottesville who represent a five-year moment in the centuries of this place's history, as viewed by one wealthy white male racist donor at another moment in the 1920s. As the Black Lives Matter movement took off nationally this year, many Charlottesville residents demanded that imposing monuments to Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson be removed from their places of prominence.

The city of Charlottesville has set up a commission on race, memorials, and public spaces. I've attended portions of two meetings and am genuinely impressed by the open, civil, and democratic process underway to find solutions and possibly consensus. The process has already been educational for me and for other members of the public and of the commission. Some white residents have mentioned realizing for the first time that African Americans do not see their history in Charlottesville's public memorials.

I am not African American, but I certainly feel the same way. I'm disgusted by the monuments to those who participated in land theft and genocide against Native Americans, by the monument to the war on Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia that killed some six million people who go unmentioned on the monument, and by the Lee, Jackson, and generic Confederate soldier statues. The possibility of seeing people and movements and causes I actually care about memorialized in public space is exhilarating and not previously hoped for.

Missing from Charlottesville's public spaces now is pretty much the entire rest of its history. Needed are educational signs, memorials, and art works that tell a million missing stories. I don't think a year should go by in which the city does not introduce a new public creation downtown as well as one in a particular neighborhood. Great public art would improve the community and even perhaps its tourism. The ideas percolating in the commission's meetings are numerous and wonderful. Participants have produced lists of hundreds of ideas.

I'd love to see the story of Native American life here pre-Charlottesville recognized, and some mention somewhere perhaps of who Charlottesville's namesake Queen Charlotte was and what role her African ancestry may have played in her absence heretofore. I think there is a place for the stories of injustice: slavery, segregation, eugenics, war, and the misguided destruction of neighborhoods. But I think we also need the stories of struggle, the civil rights work, the women's rights movement, environmentalism, worker's rights, integration, education, arts, sports, and peace as a counterpoint to all the glorifying of war.

There are countless individuals to be remembered and taught about. A memorial to Julian Bond who taught for years at the University of Virginia is a popular idea that I support -- his work for both civil rights and peace should be recognized. And as long as we're going to have a tree named for Banastre Tarleton who led efforts in Parliament to keep the slave trade going, we should have Virginia's first monument to Olaudah Equiano who was probably once a slave in Virginia and whose work in England was critical to ending the slave trade and slavery in the British empire. I also think many public markings of past events need not focus on a single individual.

There is a contingent in Charlottesville for removing Confederate war monuments, and a contingent for keeping them. There appears to be consensus around adding at least a few of the many things that are missing. Personally I've been proposing and organizing support for a peace memorial and a memorial to Charlottesville's sister cities. The two could be combined in a peace pole bearing the words "May peace prevail on earth" on each side in the languages of each sister city, as well as English and other languages most spoken in Charlottesville. Charlottesville's city council has repeatedly taken stands for peace, but nothing in public space makes note of that.

I also think Charlottesville's public space could be improved if instead of its next purchase of dozens of U.S. flags it invests in a Charlottesville flag of a design that the public supports.

The public meetings of the commission thus far have taught me things about segregation in Charlottesville that I did not know. I hope this process can somehow be continued indefinitely. But a crucial question is what the commission will end up proposing to the city council next month, and what the city council will do with that proposal.

My recommendation is that the public nature of the brainstorming process be continued and expanded in the decision-making process, that the commission create a proposal with the idea that it will receive strong support in a public referendum, and that it in fact go to a public referendum.

Whether the city council or the public decides, however, a major question will be funding. If the question goes to the public, I think the public ought to be given the option of, say, creating 50 new memorials and opting out of one new highway interchange in order to cover the cost. The public ought not to be presented with a costly proposal and no say over the rest of a budget that I suspect in great measure lacks public support.

Of course if unwanted monuments are removed, one option would be to sell them to the highest bidder willing to remove them from public space and to display them in a private space accessible in some manner to the public. A museum of Confederate statues to which one can buy a ticket would be a far different public statement from Confederate statues dominating downtown parks.

It's tempting to look for private funding for new public creations, rather than foregoing an intersection or taxing the wealthiest residents, but such funding will inevitably corrupt the decision making process, and that's where the giant old racist soldiers on horses came from in the first place.

Peace Pole Idea in the News

posted Aug 11, 2016, 6:42 AM by David Swanson   [ updated Aug 11, 2016, 6:45 AM ]

Story on Channel 19 today:
http://www.newsplex.com/content/news/A-peace-poll-petition-will-be-presented-to-the-Blue-Ribbon-Commission-389842602.html

John Clem of Pax Christi will present petition to Blue Ribbon Commission on Race, Memorials, and Public Spaces tonight.
August 11, 6-8 pm City Hall - Basement Conference Room

Want to share your thoughts with this commission? You can send an email to: RMSfeedback@charlottesville.org or call, 434-970-3101.

Now endorsed by RootsAction.org, WorldBeyondWar.org, Pax Christi Charlottesville, Amnesty International Charlottesville, and Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice.

Now signed by 168 people. http://bit.ly/cvillepeacepole

On Channel 29: http://www.nbc29.com/story/32583130/charlottesville-man-starts-petition-for-peace-pole-monument

Put a Peace Pole in Charlottesville!

Put a Peace Pole in Cville

posted Aug 8, 2016, 8:06 PM by David Swanson

https://d8s293fyljwh4.cloudfront.net/petitions/images/162620/hero/cvillepeacepole.png?1466442853
http://bit.ly/cvillepeacepole

This project is endorsed by RootsAction.org, WorldBeyondWar.org, Pax Christi Charlottesville, Amnesty International Charlottesville, and Charlottesville Center for Peace and Justice.

On the news again: http://www.nbc29.com/story/32583130/charlottesville-man-starts-petition-for-peace-pole-monument

Please attend the next meeting of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Race, Memorials, and Public Spaces, August 11, 6-8 p.m., City Hall Basement Conference Room.

Write or phone the Blue Ribbon Commission directly with your own thoughts on why there should be a memorial to peace in Charlottesville.
Email RMSfeedback@charlottesville.org
Phone 434-970-3101.






August Peace Calendar

posted Aug 1, 2016, 2:41 PM by Evan Knappenberger

Upcoming Peace & Justice Events:


This Saturday, August 6th: Hiroshima Nagasaki day is upon us.  Join CCPJ on the downtown mall from 10-2 to vigil and educate about nuclear proliferation and the ever-present danger of nuclear war.  For more info, contact Virginia.

Later on Saturday, August 6th, help Wild Virginia table at the Pavillion concert, 530-10pm.  Joe Walsh will be playing and Wild Virginia will be raising money by working the soda station. More info, click here.

Sunday, August 7th: CCPJ Monthly Meeting, Friends Meetinghouse, 1104 Forest street, 400pm.

Monday, August 8th, 7pm, will be the next meeting of Pax Christi at Church of the Incarnation.  For more info, email John Clem.

Wednesday, August 10th at 5pm there will be a showing and discussion of the 1997 film Rosewoodabout lynching and other issues facing the black community.  Discussion seems promising, free, at the Jefferson Madison Regional Library, Downtown.

August 12th-14th, Pax Christi will be hosting a national conference in Lithicum Maryland.  For more info, click here.

The weekend of August 13th will be a convention for a new minimum wage in Richmond.  The Washington Post expects thousands to turn out.  For more info, click here.

Help Wild Virginia table at the Lock Music Festival,August 28th, get to hear good music for cheap and for a good cause.  For more info, click here.

Friday, September 9th, 3pm at Starr Hill Brewery will be an environmental impact tour hosted by the anti-pipeline coalition.  For more information, click here.

Richmond Peace Festival, starting 11am on Saturday, September 10th.  Music, childrens' events, speakers and more!  For more info on this family-friendly event,contact Danielle Lilly here.

No Pipeline Benefit Concert with the Will Overman Band, Friday, September 16th, 7pm.  For more info,click here.

September 23rd-26th: CCPJ is co-sponsoring a conference with World Without War in DC, with a plethora of great workshops and speakers lined up.  This is looking like a great event.  To learn more, click here.

The weekend of October 15th and 16th, local trauma psychology specialist Chris Walker is hosting a workshop on Peace with the latest developments in attachment theory. For more info, click here.

Weekly Actions and Help Wanted


Casa Alma (Catholic Worker) is hosting a weekly prayer session, every Wed. morning, 730am, at 911 Nassau Street.  For more info, contact Laura.

No Pipeline protest at Dominion Energy office, Hydraulic road across from Whole Foods, every1st
 and 3rd Weds. from 1130-1230.  Contact Kirk for more info.

Thursday Peace Witness in front of the Federal Courthouse at Main and Ridge streets, Thursday, from 5-6pm.  Bring signs and voices!  For more info, contact Tony.

CCPJ board member Richard Lord is looking for help in advancing our Peace Education and Counter-Recruiting programs.  All help appreciated!  ContactRichard or Evan.

Living for Peace

posted Jul 28, 2016, 1:52 PM by Evan Knappenberger


David Swanson with Coy Barefoot on Making Sense of Past 8 Years

posted Jul 17, 2016, 5:06 PM by David Swanson

CCPJ and Gun Violence Prevention

posted Jul 10, 2016, 5:20 PM by Evan Knappenberger   [ updated Jul 10, 2016, 5:25 PM ]

Thanks to the extraordinary efforts of the Charlottesville Coalition for Gun Violence Prevention and CCPJ leaders Virginia Rovnyak and Bob McAdams for passing out gun locks and working to reduce gun violence in our community!  See the video here.

http://www.newsplex.com/content/news/Local-police-hand-out-free-gun-locks-in-honor-of-National-ASK-Day-383891361.html

Guess Who Wants Authority to Murder by Drone

posted Jul 1, 2016, 10:24 AM by David Swanson

If you haven't been hiding under a partisan rock for the past several years, you're aware that President Barack Obama has given himself the sort-of legalish right to murder anyone anywhere with missiles from drones.

He's not the only one who wants that power.

Yes, President Obama has claimed to have put restrictions on whom he'll murder, but in no known case has he followed any of his self-imposed non-legal restrictions. Nowhere has someone been arrested instead of killed, while in many known cases people have been killed who could have easily been arrested. In no known case has someone been killed who was an "imminent and continuing threat to the United States," or for that matter just plain imminent or just plain continuing. It's not even clear how someone could be both an imminent and a continuing threat until you study up on how the Obama administration has redefined imminent to mean theoretically imaginable someday. And, of course, in numerous cases civilians have been killed in large numbers and people have been targeted without identifying who they are. Lying dead from U.S. drone strikes are men, women, children, non-Americans, and Americans, not a single one of them charged with a crime or their extradition sought.

Who else would like to be able to do this?

One answer is most nations on earth. We now read news stories from Syria of people dying from a drone strike, with the reporter unable to determine if the missile came from a U.S., U.K., Russian, or Iranian drone. Just wait. The skies will be filled if the trend is not reversed.

Another answer is Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Bernie Sanders, but not Jill Stein. Yes, those first three candidates have said they want this power.

Another answer, however, should be just as disturbing as those already mentioned. Military commanders around the world want the authority to murder people with drones without bothering to get approval from civilian officials back home. Here's a fun quiz:

How many zones has the United States divided the globe into for purposes of complete military domination, and what are their names?

Answer: Six. They are Northcom, Southcom, Eucom, Pacom, Centcom, and Africom. (Jack, Mack, Nack, Ouack, Pack and Quack were already taken.) In normal English they are: North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Western Asia, and Africa.

Now here comes the hard question. Which of those zones has a new would-be commander who was just encouraged by a prominent Senator in an open Congressional hearing to acquire the authority to murder people in his zone without getting approval from the U.S. president?

Clue #1. It's a zone with the empire's headquarters not even located in the zone, so that this new commander speaks of killing people there as playing "an away game."

Clue #2. It's a poor zone that does not manufacture weapons but it saturated with weapons made in the United States plus France, Germany, the U.K., Russia, and China.

Clue #3. Many of the people in this zone have skin resembling people who are disproportionately targets of U.S. police department killings.

Did you get it right? That's correct: Africom is being encouraged by Senator Lindsay Graham, who a short time back wanted to be president, to blow people up with missiles from flying robots without presidential approval.

Now here's where the morality of war can wreak havoc with humanitarian imperialism. If a drone killing is not part of a war, then it looks like murder. And handing out licenses to murder to additional people looks like a worsening of the state of affairs in which just one person claims to hold such a license. But if drone killing is part of a war, and Captain Africom claims to be at war with Somalia, or with a group in Somalia, for example, well then, he wouldn't need special permission to blow up a bunch of people with manned aircraft; so why should he need it when using robotic unmanned bombers?

The trouble is that saying the word "war" doesn't have the moral or legal powers often imagined. No current U.S. war is legal under either the U.N. Charter or the Kellogg-Briand Pact. And the intuition that murdering people with a drone is wrong can't be a useful one if murdering people with a piloted plane is right, and vice versa. We actually have to choose. We actually have to set aside the scale of the killing, the type of technology, the role of robots, and all other extraneous factors, and choose whether it's acceptable, moral, legal, smart, or strategic to murder people or not.

If that seems too much of a mental strain, here's an easier guide. Just imagine what your response would be if the ruler of Europe Command asked for the authority to murder at will people of his choosing along with anybody too close to them at the time.

Put a Peace Pole in Charlottesville

posted Jun 20, 2016, 10:33 AM by David Swanson   [ updated Jun 20, 2016, 12:03 PM ]

To sign this petition to Charlottesville City Council, click here.

Set aside 1 square foot of space in a prominent public place, on the Downtown Mall or in a park, where a peace pole can be erected.

A peace pole is a popular means of expressing a desire for peace around the world, including in the United States, where peace poles are found in public plazas and parks in many locations: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peace_pole

A peace pole can be purchased for $200 with "May Peace Prevail on Earth" written on four sides in four chosen languages: http://stores.bigwaterhosting.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=peacepoles&Category_Code=peace_poles

Charlottesville's monuments to wars, including the Native American genocide, the defense of slavery, and the slaughter of 3.8 million Vietnamese, dominate public space. Removing them would be ideal.

An easier method of quickly displaying our city's support for peace would be to create a peace pole. Charlottesville's city council has spoken up repeatedly over the years for peace, for reduced military spending, for transition to peaceful industries, and for a halt to particular wars. But a visitor to Charlottesville cannot observe any of that anywhere on the landscape.

Charlottesville has four sister cities, and signs indicating them are visible in Charlottesville. But the motto of Sister Cities International, "Peace Through People," is nowhere to be found. There is no location set aside to celebrate these relationships, as there could be in combination with a peace pole.

Please send this petition to everyone you know in Charlottesville, Va.: http://bit.ly/cvillepeacepole

We will deliver the petition to Charlottesville City Council on a date to be set in future.<--break->


ISIS and U.S. Weaponry: At Home and Abroad

posted Jun 14, 2016, 1:38 PM by David Swanson

When someone commits mass murder in the United States and is tied, however significantly, to a foreign terrorist group, there remains a section of the U.S. population willing to recognize and point out that no ideology, fit of hatred, or mental derangement can do the same damage without high-tech weaponry that it does with it. Why does this understanding vanish into the ether of ignorance and apathy at the water's edge?

ISIS videos display U.S. guns, U.S. Humvees, U.S. weaponry of all sorts. The profits and political corruption that bring those weapons into existence are the same as those that litter the United States with guns. Shouldn't we be bothered by both?

The same politicians who claim they'd like to restrict U.S. gun sales have flooded the world markets with the weaponry of mass slaughter. President Obama's administration has approved more weapons sales abroad than any other administration since World War II. Over 60 percent of those weapons have been sold to the Middle East. Add to that total huge quantities of U.S. weapons in the hands of the United States or its proxies in the Middle East -- or formerly in their hands but seized by ISIS.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton waived restrictions at the State Department on selling weapons to Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Kuwait, United Arab Emirates, Oman, and Qatar, all states that had donated to the Clinton Foundation. Saudi Arabia had chipped in at least $10 million, and Boeing added another $900,000 as Secretary Clinton made it her mission to get Saudi Arabia the planes with which it would attack Yemen.

In the past five years, the United States has sold weapons to at least 96 countries. As of 2011 the United States accounted for 79% of the value of transfer agreements to ship weapons to governments in the Middle East, 79% also to poor nations around the world, and 77% of the value of total agreements to ship weapons to other countries, according to the Congressional Research Service. By 2014, those percentages had dropped a bit but remained over 50%.

In 2013, the big war profiteers spent $65 million lobbying Congress. There's a big headline when the National Rifle Association spends $3 million. We ask if black lives matter. In addition, do foreign lives matter?

Toddlers with guns kill more people in the United States than do foreign terrorists -- even adding in domestic terrorists somehow tied to foreign ideas. But we don't hate toddlers. We don't bomb toddlers and whoever's near them. We don't think of toddlers as inherently evil or backward or belonging to the wrong religion. We forgive them instantly, without struggle. It's not their fault the guns were left lying around.

But is it the fault of ISIS that Iraq was destroyed? That Libya was thrown into chaos? That the region was flooded with U.S.-made weapons? That future ISIS leaders were tortured in U.S. camps? That life was made into a nightmare? Maybe not, but it is their fault they murder people. They are adults. They know what they are doing.

True enough. But could they do it without the weapons?

On the domestic scene, we are able to recognize that other nations have conflict, hatred, and crime, but that -- in the absence of all the guns -- the crimes do less damage. Australia got rid of its guns following a killing less deadly than Orlando. Now a gun in Australia costs more than anyone would be likely to get out of an armed robbery. Now Australia has no mass killings, apart from its participation in U.S. wars.

On the foreign scene, can we recognize that regions armed to the teeth with U.S. weapons, wars with U.S. weapons on both sides, and CIA and Pentagon proxies fighting each other in Syria are not the inevitable result of backwardness in Arab culture, but rather the result of giving free rein to merchants of death?

1-10 of 18