Central Air Units Prices

    central air
  • An air conditioner (often referred to as AC) is a home appliance, system or mechanism designed to dehumidify and extract heat from an area. The cooling is done using a simple refrigeration cycle.
    prices
  • The amount of money expected, required, or given in payment for something
  • The odds in betting
  • (price) the amount of money needed to purchase something; "the price of gasoline"; "he got his new car on excellent terms"; "how much is the damage?"
  • (price) monetary value: the property of having material worth (often indicated by the amount of money something would bring if sold); "the fluctuating monetary value of gold and silver"; "he puts a high price on his services"; "he couldn't calculate the cost of the collection"
  • determine the price of; "The grocer priced his wares high"
  • An unwelcome experience, event, or action involved as a condition of achieving a desired end
    units
  • A device that has a specified function, esp. one forming part of a complex mechanism
  • unit of measurement: any division of quantity accepted as a standard of measurement or exchange; "the dollar is the United States unit of currency"; "a unit of wheat is a bushel"; "change per unit volume"
  • (unit) an individual or group or structure or other entity regarded as a structural or functional constituent of a whole; "the reduced the number of units and installations"; "the word is a basic linguistic unit"
  • An individual thing or person regarded as single and complete, esp. for purposes of calculation
  • Each of the individuals or collocations into which a complex whole may be divided
  • (unit) an organization regarded as part of a larger social group; "the coach said the offensive unit did a good job"; "after the battle the soldier had trouble rejoining his unit"
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Pennsylvania Central Airlines Boeing Model 247
Pennsylvania Central Airlines Boeing Model 247
The Boeing Model 247 was an early United States airliner, considered the first such aircraft to fully incorporate advances such as all-metal (anodized aluminum) semi-monocoque construction, a fully cantilevered wing and retractable landing gear. Other advanced features included control surface trim tabs, an autopilot and deicing boots for the wings and tailplane. Ordered off the drawing board, the 247 first flew on February 8, 1933, and entered service later that year. Subsequently, development in airliner design saw engines and airframes becoming larger, and four-engine designs emerged, but no significant changes to this basic formula appeared until cabin pressurization and high altitude flight were introduced in the early 1940s with the first pressurized airliner, the 307 Stratoliner. Design and development Boeing had eclipsed other aviation manufacturers by introducing a host of aerodynamic and technical features into a commercial airliner. This advanced design which was a progression from earlier Monomail (Models 200, 221, 221A) and B-9 bomber designs, combined speed and safety. The Boeing 247 was faster than the U.S. premier fighter aircraft of its day, the Boeing P-12, which was an open-cockpit biplane. Yet its flight envelope included a rather docile 62 mph landing speed which precluded the need for flaps, and pilots learned that at speeds as low as 10 mph, the 247 could be taxiied tail high for ease of ground handling. In addition, the 247 was the first twin-engine passenger transport able to fly on one engine. With controllable pitch propellers (standard equipment on the 247D), the 247 could maintain 11,500 ft at maximum gross takeoff weight. Its combination of features set the standard for the Douglas DC-1 and other airliners before World War II. Originally planned as a 14-passenger airliner powered by Pratt and Whitney R-1690 Hornet radial engines, the preliminary review of the design concept by United Air Lines' pilots had resulted in a re-design to a smaller, less capable design configuration. One concern of the pilots was that no airfield then in existence, in their view, could safely take an eight-ton aircraft. They also objected to the use of Hornet engines because most pilots were accustomed to the less-powerful Wasps and would find Hornets overpowering. Pratt & Whitney's chief engineer, George Mead, knew that this thinking was misguided and that within a few years would seem antiquated. P&W's president, Frederick Rentschler, faced with a tough decision, decided to acquiesce to the airline pilots' unanimous demand. The decision created a rift between Mead and Rentschler. Despite the bitter disagreements on design and engines, the 247 was still a remarkable achievement and was Boeing's showcase exhibit at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair. The cockpit windshield of the first 247s was angled forward instead of the conventional aft sweep. This was the design solution (similar to that adopted by other contemporary aircraft that used a forward raked windscreen) to the problem of lighted control panel instruments reflecting off the windshield at night, but it turned out that the forward-sloping windshield would reflect ground lights instead, especially during landings, and it also increased drag slightly. By the introduction of the 247D, the windshield was sloped aft in the usual way, and the night-glare problem was resolved by installing an extension (the glarescreen) over the control panel. Boeing considered safety features highly, building in structural strength as well as incorporating design elements that enhanced customer comfort and well-being, such as the thermostatically-controlled, air conditioned and sound-proof cabin. The crew included a pilot and co-pilot as well as a flight attendant who could tend to passenger needs. The main landing gear did not fully retract; a portion of the wheels extended below the nacelles, typical of designs of the time, as a means of reducing structural damage in a wheels-up landing. The tailwheel was not retractable. While the Model 247 and 247A had speed-ring engine cowlings and fixed-pitch propellers, the Model 247D incorporated NACA cowlings and variable pitch propellers. Operational history Boeing 247D in its MacRobertson Race markings, c. 1934. Note the inaccurate race number and dramatic pose in this fanciful 1935 illustrated card art. As the 247 emerged from its test and development phase, the company further showcased its capabilities by entering a long-distance air race in 1934, the MacRobertson Race from England to Australia. During the 1930s, aircraft designs were often proven in air races and other aerial contests. A modified 247D was entered, flown by Col.Roscoe Turner and Clyde Pangborn. The 247, race number 57, was essentially a production model but all airliner furnishings were deleted to accommodate additional fuselage fuel tanks (eight in total). The MacRobertson Race attracted aircraft entries from all over the globe includin
061030-F-7426P-311
061030-F-7426P-311
U.S. Navy Explosive Ordnance Technician 1st Class Donnie Walkey carries a 107 mm rocket out of the Iraqi police headquarters in Ad Diwaniyah, Iraq, Oct. 30, 2006, for transport to Camp Echo, Iraq. The U.S. Navy EOD Mobile Unit 3 responded to the Iraqi police headquarters to recover a cache of explosives found by policemen during a checkpoint vehicle search. Walkey is from the U.S. Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 3 Team, Multinational Division - Central South (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Dawn M. Price) (Released)