Cellulosic Ethanol (Ceetol -the good ethanol!) 

          The abbreviation for Cellulosic Ethanol is.... Ceetol 

                    Ce-Et-OL (Cellulosic Ethanol - Alcohol )

 

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EDUCATION:                         What is ceetol? PLAY>    Sugarcane in Brazil PLAY.    

CEETOL PRODUCERS                                      Bluefire Ethanol      Cavaliere Capital Corp.  Clentech Biofuels Inc.  IogenCorp.                                                KL Process Design Group   Novozymes                   Pacific Ethanol Inc.          Poet Energy              Rangefuels Inc.              Archer Daniels Midland   Iogen Corp.                   Abengoa

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CURRENT EVENTS      CHINA BANS CORN ETHANOL                            D.O.E. FOCUS ON CEETOL BIOENERGY PACT: EUROPE AND AFRICA

STOCKS                    INVESTORS FOCUS   CEETOL  STOCKS

INTERESTING LINKS: 2GBIOFUELS    RENEWABLE FUELS NOW!  NEW METHODS OF CEETOL PRODUCTION  ETHANOL OR FOOD MYTH

Contact:                                 Gerry McLoughlin - C.E.O. U.S. +(239) 601-3339

 

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Oil Crisis looming? Ceetol is the Answer.

Cellulosic ethanol (also called ceetol) is a type of biofuel produced from lignocellulose, a structural material that comprises much of the mass of plants. Lignocellulose is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Corn stover, switchgrass, miscanthus and woodchip are some of the more popular cellulosic materials for ethanol production. Cellulosic ethanol is chemically identical to ethanol from other sources, such as corn starch or sugar, but has the advantage that the lignocellulose raw material is highly abundant and diverse. However, it differs in that it requires a greater amount of processing to make the sugar monomers available to the microorganisms that are typically used to produce ethanol by fermentation.

Switchgrass is the major biomass material being studied today, due to its high levels of cellulose. Cellulose, however, is contained in nearly every natural, free-growing plant, tree, and bush, in meadows, forests, and fields all over the world without agricultural effort or cost needed to make it grow. Whether distilled from agricultural crops such as corn, wheat, barley or created from cellulose, ethanol is ethyl alcohol; it is identical in chemical composition regardless of the source thus calling it cellulosic ethanol is initially misleading because it (cellulosic ethanol) is no different physically from corn ethanol or wheat ethanol. In essence, the term is used to describe the process for producing the alcohol rather than specifying a type of ethanol. According to US Department of Energy studies conducted by the Argonne Laboratories of the University of Chicago, one of the benefits of cellulosic ethanol is that it reduces greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by 85% over reformulated gasoline.

By contrast, starch ethanol (e.g., from corn), which most frequently uses natural gas to provide energy for the process, may not reduce GHG emissions at all depending on how the starch-based feedstock is produced. A study by Nobel Prize winner Paul Crutzen, find "net climate warming" effect of ethanol produced from corn, rapeseed (canola), and sugarcane when compared to oil.[1]

Ethanol, if made from cellulose, emits 80 percent less global warming pollution than gasoline.

The first attempt at commercializing a process for ethanol from wood was done in Germany in 1898. It involved the use of dilute acid to hydrolyze the cellulose to glucose, and was able to produce 7.6 liters of ethanol per 100 kg of wood waste (18 gal per ton). The Germans soon developed an industrial process optimized for yields of around 50 gallons per ton of biomass. This process soon found its way to the United States, culminating in two commercial plants operating in the southeast during World War I. These plants used what was called "the American Process" — a one-stage dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis. Though the yields were half that of the original German process (25 gallons of ethanol per ton versus 50), the throughput of the American process was much higher. A drop in lumber production forced the plants to close shortly after the end of World War I. In the meantime, a small, but steady amount of research on dilute acid hydrolysis continued at the USDA's Forest Products Laboratory.

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