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Welcome to the Cedar's Revolution Website

The Cedar's Revolution stands for Horriyeh, Siyadeh, Istiqlal (Freedom, Sovereignty, Independence), and Haqiqa, Horriyeh, Wahdeh wataniyeh (Truth, Freedom, National unity) for all Lebanese, not based on race, color, creed, religion, national heritage, sex, age, or disability - Truely A Lebanon for ALL LEBANESE.

Welcome to the Cedar's Revolution Website - Interviews

25 Aug 2006

CALL THE ENEMY BY THE NAME IT CALLS ITSELF

 
The Sun Sentinel
 
Walid Phares
http://aolsearch.aol.com/aol/imageDetails?invocationType=imageDetails&query=walid+phares&img=http://www.floridaisrael.org/walid.jpg&site=www.floridaisrael.org&host=http://www.floridaisrael.org/walid_phares.html&b=image?query=walid+phares&page=2&userid=443bd88b-0021b-06f68-e4960c40&invocationType=imageTab&clickstreamid=5825325351697931650The organized campaign against the use by government of the term "Islamic fascists" is an indication that the War of Ideas is raging in the center of the War on Terror. In this clash of words and ideas, it is the education of the public, as well as the identity of those who do the educating, that will make a difference. The less informed Americans are about the enemy's ideology, the more Islamist pressure groups can attack the president, congressional and world leaders on rhetoric, blurring the public mobilization.

The term used by the president -- "Islamic fascists" -- when referring to the al-Qaida plotters in London, triggered a wave of negative reactions by Islamist lobbies, but also by moderate Muslim groups worldwide. The president most likely meant "Islamo-fascists" when he was attempting to expose the radicals. But Islamist lobbies were quick to "interpret" it as implying that "Muslims are fascists" -- an assumption which would necessarily elicit strong negative feelings from the Muslim community, moderates included.

"Islamo-fascism," on the other hand (a term used by the president in speeches in 2005), makes for a more precise term because it refers to a particular set of ideologies and movements such as Salafism, Wahabism and Khumeinism, not a religious community per se. Just as the word "Crusaders" doesn't equate with "Christians," the term "Islamist" doesn't equate with "Muslims."

In the Arabic debates online and on the airwaves, reform- oriented Arabs and Muslims who are opposed to Fundamentalism call the followers of the latter Islamiyeen (Islamists), fashiyeen (fascists), Jihadiyeen (jihadists) and others. Ironically, the radicals of al-Qaida and Hezbollah identify themselves as "Islamists" and "jihadists."

Hence, it would be most logical to use the terminology produced by both of the Muslim sides: Islamist-jihadists.

But it is important that leaders, intellectuals and academics explain to their audiences that words are part of the War of Ideas. The public must understand that there are political forces that are putting pressure on governments and media around the world to block knowledge as part of an effort to shield the radicals and the terrorists.

Here is a summarized lexicon for basic words:

In view of sensitivities and the complexity of the debate, terms to avoid are any association between the term Muslim and terrorism, fascism, etc, especially if it is generalized. One may be born a Muslim, but becomes an Islamist. So the term Islamic is an attribute to a behavior, an action or a self-assertion.

The root identification between Muslim and Islamic is clear, but the linguistic nuance between Islamic and Islamist in the Arabic language is very narrow. In English (and other Western languages) it would be best to use the most identifiable term when addressing an ideological movement. While one can use the term Islamic when associating with radicalism, it would be academically permissible to use it while stressing on the attribute such as radical Islamic groups, instead of Islamic radicals. This description would equalize with, for example, "radical any other group."

However, as advanced above, the most accurate terms would be directly borrowed from Arabic, such as Islamist and jihadists. Both are well-known ideologies with clear political and militant agendas, massively used in the Arab and Muslim world.

Islamist is a perfectly legitimate term that describes a particular ideology such as Salafism, Khumeinism or jihadism. Not only is it used in the academic world as an indicator for an ideology and not a community, but it is used by followers around the world. Thus adding attributes to Islamist is academically sound and understood. For example: Islamist-fascists or Islamo-fascist, Islamist-Salafist, etc.

But the most descriptive term of the actual "movement" at war with the U.S and democracies around the world is clearly jihadism or al Jihadiya. It is a militant doctrine, an ideology, which has generated movements, including the terrorist organizations at war with the U.S., Europe, Russia, India and the moderate Arab and Muslim countries. Arab media and governments use this terminology, but the most important argument is that the terrorists describe themselves as jihadists when in action, and Islamists ideologically.

If Islamist pressure groups criticize any official for using the term Jihadist and Jihadism, they can be responded to that the Nazis called themselves Nazis in WWII.

The U.S. president, Congress and other world leaders have the duty to alert the public with regard to the name, ideology and plans of the enemy -- in this case, the jihadists.

Dr Walid Phares is a senior fellow with the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies and the author of Future Jihad.

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TV
Phares to MSNBC on Amsterdam's flight to India: "A background for concerns is credible"
Phares to MSNBC on Amsterdam's flight to India: "A background for concerns is credible"
Aug 23, 2006, 16:11

TV
Phares on al Jazeera: "Civil societies are opposed to Ahmedinijad, Assad and Hezbollah"
Dr Walid Phares will be on al Jazeera TV todat Tuesday at 3 PM (EST) and 10 PM (East Mediterranean) to discuss the Jihadist movements, Hezbollah and the Arab Governments.
Aug 22, 2006, 09:35

Interviews
PHARES IN THE MEDIA:
Download/View File ]
Aug 22, 2006, 09:00

TV
Phares on CNN's Glen Beck: "The Jihadists and Iran's regime started their war a long time ago"
Professor Walid Phares to CNN's Glen Beck: "The Jihadists and Iran's regime started their war a long time ago" Visit Website ]
Aug 21, 2006, 19:53

TV
Phares on CNN International: "Ahmedijad's regime is rushing to war to dodge its domestic challenges"
Terrorism expert Walid Phares on CNN International on the Iranian regime war preparations
Aug 21, 2006, 19:39
 
TV
Phares on Fox News Cavuto: "Iran's regime has started a global war"
Terrorism expert Walid Phares to Fox News' Neil Cavuto: "The Iranian regime has already started a global war in Lebanon, Iraq, Iran and has eyes on Arabia as well as Hezbollah's world capabilities." Visit Website ]
Aug 21, 2006, 19:36

Radio
Phares on Radio Iraq: "No greater images than those of democracy movements in the region"
Dr Walid Phares comments in Arabic to Radio Iraq on US President's remarks about Iraq: "There are no greater pictures than the voters and demonstrators in Iraq, Lebanon and other parts of the region." Visit Website ]
Aug 21, 2006, 11:49

TV
Phares in an Al Hurra show "Eye on Democracy": The democracy forces are irreversible in the Middle East, long term"
Phares in an Al Hurra show "Eye on Democracy": The democracy forces are irreversible in the Middle East, long term"
Aug 17, 2006, 18:13

TV
Phares on al Hurra TV: "Hezbollah, Syria and Iran ordered the war to escape their isolation"
Mideast expert Walid Phares participated in a forum on al Hurra TV on the Mideast crisis: "Hezbollah, Syria and Iran ordered the war to escape their isolation"
Aug 17, 2006, 18:08

TV
Phares on MSNBC: "Mutant Jihadism has already produced women suicide bombers"
Commenting on the London Trans Atlantic plot to blow up US airliners, Walid Phares on MSNBC: "Mutant Jihad has already produced female suicide bombers. It can go beyond that." Visit Website ]
Aug 16, 2006, 21:41
 
Radio
Phares to BBC Arabic Radio: "Assad speech shows his anger at Lebanon's rejection of its occupation"
Phares to BBC Arabic Radio: "Assad speech shows his anger at Lebanon's rejection of its occupation"
Aug 16, 2006, 18:11

TV
Phares on Fox News: "UNSCR 1701 asks the Lebanese Government to disarm Hezbollah!"
Terrorism expert Walid Phares on Fox News panel: "UNSCR 1701 asks the Lebanese Government to disarm Hezbollah!" Visit Website ]
Aug 14, 2006, 19:29

Interviews
Phares in al Muharer: "The Cedars Revolution was failed by its politicians"
Phares in al Muharer:"Cedars Revolution was betrayed by its own politicians who failed to proceed with political change: Despite an overwhelming mandate by one and a million people on March 14, 2005, the political representatives of the masses stopped short of removing the pro-Syrian President, brought back the pro-Syrian speaker of the Parliament, brought Hezbollah into the Government, and wasted precious time in photo ops with Hassan Nasrallah, while Hezbollah was preparing for a war to suppress the Revolution and crumble the Government."
Aug 13, 2006, 20:02

TV
Phares on Fox News Panel: ""Who is going to help the Lebanese Government take the control of the Lebanese Syrian borders?"
Terrorism expert Walid Phares on Fox News Panel: "Who is going to help the Lebanese Government take the control of the Lebanese Syrian borders?" Visit Website ]
Aug 13, 2006, 19:35

TV
Phares on Canada Global TV: "Future 9/11 and 7/7 can be intercepted if.."
Phares on Canada Global TV: "Future 9/11 and 7/7 can be intercepted if.." News item at http://www.canada.com/globaltv/national/story.html?id=50fd6877-fac4-4a63-925b-97b360a7c146 and watch the interview below Visit Website ]
Aug 13, 2006, 19:14
 
TV
Phares to MSNBC's "Most": Nowadays radicals in the West, live online, travel and perform Jihad in the West"
Terrorism analyst Walid Phares to MSNBC's "The Most": "Nowadays Western Jihadi radicals connect online, fly to remote areas, connect with real local leaders and coem back to practice Jihad within democracies."
Visit Website ]
Aug 11, 2006, 20:57

Interviews
Phares in al Muharer: "The Cedars Revolution was failed by its politicians"
Phares in al Muharer:"Cedars Revolution was betrayed by its own politicians who failed to proceed with political change: Despite an overwhelming mandate by one and a million people on March 14, 2005, the political representatives of the masses stopped short of removing the pro-Syrian President, brought back the pro-Syrian speaker of the Parliament, brought Hezbollah into the Government, and wasted precious time in photo ops with Hassan Nasrallah, while Hezbollah was preparing for a war to suppress the Revolution and crumble the Government." Visit Website ]
Aug 11, 2006, 20:02

Interviews
Phares Interview on News Max: Iran Poised To Be 'Mother of All World Threats'
Phares says he regrets that no one policy regarding the Cedars Revolution was ever put forth. Billions of dollars were spent on the War of Ideas and Iraq while requests by Lebanese NGOs, small media and civil society groups ready to resume the Cedars Revolution were left unheard, he adds. Visit Website ]
Aug 11, 2006, 19:20

TV
Phares on MSNBC: "Jihadi plot over the Atlantic"
Walid Phares comments on the London Terror airliners plot. Visit Website ]
Aug 10, 2006, 23:54

Op Eds
Phares on CTB: London: The "Shoe Bomber Factory" again?
looking at the "factory." For as long as there are Jihadi minds out there, improvisation from shoes to hand bags is only a process of mutation. In my book Future Jihad I called it just that: "Mutant Jihad" Visit Website ]
Aug 10, 2006, 23:52
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13 Aug 2006

Phares on Fox News Round Table Night (II)

                                               
On Hezbollah-Israel War,  UN 1559 and 1701 resolutions, Lebanon, Syria and Iran
 
For the second night Mideast expert Walid Phares, FDD Senior Fellow, will participate in a Fox News panel during the "Big Story Prime Time" at around 10:40 PM tonight Sunday for one segment. Fox News' anchor Megyn Kendall will moderate a panel including Jennifer Griffin, Fox News corespondant in Jerusalem and Fox News corespondent in Beirut.
 
The discussion will center on the battles between Israel and Hezbollah, the Lebanese Government, the UN resolutions 1559 and 1701 and the positions Syria and Iran.
 
This interview is tentative and could be modified or canceled
 

12 Aug 2006

Phares on Fox News Round Table Tonight

                                               
On the UN resolution, Hezbollah, Israel, Lebanon, Syria and Iran
 
Mideast expert Walid Phares, FDD Senior Fellow, will be featured on a Fox News panel during the "Big Story Prime Time" in the 10 PM hour. Fox News' Megyn Kendall will moderate a panel including General Bob Scales, General Don Edwards and Jennifer Griffin, Fox News corespondant in Jerusalem. Lebanese Finance minister Jihad Azour may be also participate.
 
The discussion will center on the War, the new UN resolution and the positions of Hezbollah, Israel, Lebanon, Syria and Iran, as well as the United States.
 
This and any other program is tentative and could be modified or cancelled
 

'The jihadists are a fascist movement'

The Spectator

The Sunday Business  

 

Published: Monday 7th August 2006
First published in The Business

Walid Phares, the brilliant scholar of terrorism, lived through the worst of times in Lebanon, the country where he was born. At the height of the civil war, he would make the perilous journey out of Lebanon in flimsy vessels that were easy targets for Syria’s long-range missiles. In the 1980s, we used commercial ships, with no Navy escort, sometimes under direct artillery action, he recalls.

It was in the rather more relaxed setting of London’s Savoy Hotel that I met Phares, who now lives in America and has made his name since 9/11 as one of the leading analysts of terrorism. His latest book, Future Jihad: Waging War Against the West, will be published in the UK in the autumn; its superb US edition has become a must-read in foreign policy circles in Washington and for good reason. Talking to Phares, a senior fellow at the Foundation for the Defence of Democracies, made me realise how right Lenin was when he said everything is connected to everything else. What was supposed to be a quick chat about recent events morphed into a lengthy and fascinating seminar about the history of the Islamic world and the theory and practice of jihad across the ages, but still left me hungry for more.

The emergence of current strands of Islamic extremism long predates the creation of Israel or the Cold War, Phares explains. He peppers the conversation with Arabic to make his case, which is that today’s jihadist movements see themselves as a continuation of the Islamic state and strive for its reestablishment within in its old borders.

The abolition of the Caliphate by Ataturk in 1924 freed jihadists from an ultimate Islamic authority for the first time since the seventh century. This unleashed the Saudi Wahhabis, and triggered the creation of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood. The Afghan battlefield produced a convergence into al-Qaeda, which soon became a rival school of its own. All these groups compete over the best way to re-establish the Sunni Caliphate, held up as the solution to the Muslim world’s problems. Meanwhile, the Iranian revolution saw the rise of a Shia jihadism; it too seeks leadership of Islam and to wage war against the infidels.

Phares, who advised the UN on disarming Hezbollah, is at his most passionate when discussing his native Lebanon. As long as there is no strategic change in Lebanon, starting with Hezbollah’s disarming and having international forces taking the control of the Lebanese-Syrian and Lebanese-Israeli borders, the bombings may give Israel some time, but will eventually transform Lebanon into an extension of Iran, he argues.

When Rafiq Hariri, the Lebanese Prime Minister, was murdered in 2005, prompting the Cedar Revolution, one and a half million people “ Christians, Druze, Sunnis and even some Shia“ marched for democracy, dealing Hezbollah and their Iranian paymasters a devastating blow. It shattered the myth of Syria’s brotherly occupation, forced Damascus to withdraw, and proved that only a minority supported Hezbollah.

 But the jihadists immediately fought back to re-establish the Tehran-Damascus-Beirut axis at the heart of the Iranian regime’s blueprint for dominance of the global jihadist movement. Hassan Nasrallah, the Hezbollah leader, struck a deal with Prime Minister Fouad Seniora: three members of Hezbollah joined the cabinet, laying the seeds for disaster. As part of a one-year plan, Hezbollah, perhaps with the help of Syrian intelligence, launched an assassination campaign against politicians and journalists supportive of the Cedar Revolution, convincing most anti-Syrian politicians that any serious opposition to Iran-Syria-Hezbollah would be savagely punished.

The government was forced to stall on UN Security Council resolution 1559, which stipulates that all militias should be disarmed, and to sit down instead with Hezbollah to discuss    the future of their weapons. Parliament was paralyzed with the help of the pro-Syrian speaker Nabih Berri and the Aoun bloc; the allies of Emile Lahoud, the equally pro-Syrian president, were also tapped. Soon, says Phares, the Lebanese army command was intimidated, the Lebanese Diaspora divided, pro-Syrian and jihadist networks in Lebanon and within the Palestinian camps reactivated, and weapons distributed to allied militias.

Hezbollah s plan was to bring war with Israel back to the forefront of Lebanese politics; eventually, Seniora would be accused of treason and overthrown, and a new, non-Cedar government imposed, realigning the country with Tehran. As to timing, events in the region were crucial: Iran needed to divert attention from its nuclear programme; Syria wanted to inflame the Gaza and the Israeli-Lebanese borders to overshadow the UN investigation on the assassination of Hariri; finally, Hamas needed a new clash with the Zionist enemy    to deflect attention from its looming civil war with Fatah.

While the response from Israel, as well as the original reaction from Seniora and most Arab states  they didn t extend their full support to Hezbollah “ took the Iranians by surprise, they quickly readjusted their strategy. Together with supporters of ex-premier Michel Aoun, Hezbollah unleashed a campaign to depict the Israelis as aggressors rather than victims, making full use of horrible tragedies such as the civilians deaths in the Lebanese village of Qana. Lebanon and the Arab world are all now furiously condemning Israel. Hezbollah s plan for the Lebanese army is to drag it into a fight with Israel, to destroy it,    says Phares. The options are very limited: either Hezbollah will dominate Lebanon, or the latter will disarm Hezbollah. Anything in between would be a waste of time. The international community must form a multinational force to assist the Lebanese army   .

As to the wider war on terror, Phares is angry that the West has ignored moderate Muslims and reformers, in the West as well as in the Islamic world, instead treating those who support the jihad as truly representative. For decades, the only issue  debated was the Arab- Israeli conflict   , he says. There was little study of jihadism, human rights abuses, women s liberation movements or the treatment of minorities; worst of all, terrorists were routinely presented as reformers.

The vast majority of intellectuals still live on a pre 9/11 planet. They refuse, even after the rise of democratic movements and dissidents in the region, to acknowledge that the jihadists are a fascist movement.    This must change, Phares pleads; the only hope is to support young Muslims who advocate democracy and social change.

Across the centuries, the jihadists often agreed temporary tactical alliances with one enemy, better to defeat another, a lesson which France, China and even Russia appear not yet to have learnt. But Phares  crucial lesson is that we should never forget that all jihadist strands, regardless of how much they hate one another, are ultimately committed to the same aim, which is to wage war against those with whom they disagree. The barbarians killed each other more than they killed Romans,    Phares warned me. Yet they eventually destroyed the empire.  

http://www.spectator.co.uk/

http://www.spectator.co.uk/online-edition/elsewhere/24432/the-jihadists-are-a-fascist-movement.thtml

 

 ----------------------------------------------------------------

Walid Phares - Interviewed on Lebanon & Jihadists' Aims

By Andrew Cochran

In an excellent article titled, "East and West must beware new Barbarians at the gates," British journalist Allister Heath interviews Walid Phares about the implications of the current situation in Lebanon for the jihadist movement. Some excerpts follow, and you can read the entire article here (also linked on the "CT Blog Experts in the Media" page):

Walid Phares, the brilliant scholar of terrorism, lived through the worst of times in Lebanon, the country where he was born. At the height of the civil war, he would make the perilous journey out of Lebanon in flimsy vessels that were easy targets for Syria’s long-range missiles. “In the 1980s, we used commercial ships, with no Navy escort, sometimes under direct artillery action,” he recalls....

The emergence of current strands of Islamic extremism long predates the creation of Israel or the Cold War, Phares explains. He peppers the conversation with Arabic to make his case, which is that today’s jihadist movements see themselves as a continuation of the Islamic state and strive for its reestablishment within in its old borders.

The abolition of the Caliphate by Ataturk in 1924 freed jihadists from an ultimate Islamic authority for the first time since the seventh century. This unleashed the Saudi Wahhabis, and triggered the creation of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood. The Afghan battlefield produced a convergence into al-Qaeda, which soon became a rival school of its own. All these groups compete over the best way to re-establish the Sunni Caliphate, held up as the solution to the Muslim world’s problems. Meanwhile, the Iranian revolution saw the rise of a Shia jihadism; it too seeks leadership of Islam and to wage war against the infidels...

“Hezbollah’s plan for the Lebanese army is to drag it into a fight with Israel, to destroy it,” says Phares. “The options are very limited: either Hezbollah will dominate Lebanon, or the latter will disarm Hezbollah. Anything in between would be a waste of time. The international community must form a multinational force to assist the Lebanese army”.

 

As to the wider war on terror, Phares is angry that the West has ignored moderate Muslims and reformers, in the West as well as in the Islamic world, instead treating those who support the jihad as truly representative. “For decades, the only ‘issue’ debated was the Arab- Israeli conflict”, he says. There was little study of jihadism, human rights abuses, women’s liberation movements or the treatment of minorities; worst of all, terrorists were routinely presented as reformers.

“The vast majority of intellectuals still live on a pre 9/11 planet. They refuse, even after the rise of democratic movements and dissidents in the region, to acknowledge that the jihadists are a fascist movement.” This must change, Phares pleads; the only hope is to support young Muslims who advocate democracy and social change.

Across the centuries, the jihadists often agreed temporary tactical alliances with one enemy, better to defeat another, a lesson which France, China and even Russia appear not yet to have learnt. But Phares’ crucial lesson is that we should never forget that all jihadist strands, regardless of how much they hate one another, are ultimately committed to the same aim, which is to wage war against those with whom they disagree. “The barbarians killed each other more than they killed Romans,” Phares warned me. “Yet they eventually destroyed the empire.”

 

August 8, 2006 11:12 AM 

This site will not rest till Lebanon see's Horriyeh, Siyadeh, Istiqlal (Freedom, Sovereignty, Independence)