Scaffolding for Success

Why use scaffolding?


Effective scaffolding can increase the students’ independence in

 performing a task or learning a new concept through the

gradual release of responsibility

(Echevarria, Vogt & Short, 2010; Fisher & Frey, 2008).  




One of the main benefits of scaffolded instruction is that it provides for a supportive learning environment in which students are free to ask questions, provide feedback and support their peers in learning new material.

When you incorporate scaffolding in the classroom, you become more of a mentor and facilitator of knowledge rather than the dominant content expert.



Scaffolding for Success: Best Practices for Secondary ELLs 

http://newsmanager.commpartners.com/tesolc/issues/2014-10-01/3.html 

I wrote this article with my colleague Beth Amaral based our implementation of scaffolding strategies at Danbury HS in CT.


 I've uploaded several templates at the bottom of the page with examples from these three main areas of scaffolding:


 Verbal     Procedural Instructional
 Techniques focused on language  development:

Paraphrasing
Using “think-alouds
Reinforcing contextual definitions
Providing correct pronunciation by repeating students’ responses
Slowing speech, increasing pauses, and speaking in phrases
Purposefully using synonyms, antonyms and cognates



 Techniques related to grouping and activity   structures:

Use of routines
Explanations are very clear about what students are to do, and how they are to do it.
Steps to processes and procedures are written, orally presented, and modeled, so students will be more likely to succeed.
Cooperative learning activities. Students support one another as they are learning the subject matter and accomplishing their roles. They practice their oral language skills as they interact verbally.  
 Tools that support learning:

visuals and imagery
manipulatives
models and diagrams
making a variety of resources available in the classroom, e.g. dictionary, thesaurus, computers.
posting schedules and project timelines
graphic organizers (GIST)
chapter outlines (THIEVES)
word walls
pictographs
sentence starters and academic language frames





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