Visiting the Cemetery

Marshfield Pioneer Cemetery

https://sites.google.com/site/cbcemetery/home/TLC4MPC.jpg?attredirects=0

https://sites.google.com/site/cbcemetery/home/ruler-short.gif?attredirects=0

funding a new fence
with a little help from a lot of friends!

Help us replace the deteriorating chain link fence along the boundary between
the Marshfield Pioneer Cemetery and Marshfield High School
with new, ornamental, industrial-grade metal fencing.
We are asking our many stakeholders
-- high school students, relatives of those buried in the cemetery, and community members --
to contribute
ONE DOLLAR for ONE INCH
as an “investment” in this new fence.

Partial funding for this project is provided by a grant from the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries. 
Help us raise the additional funds needed by demonstrating your support and making a tax-deductible donation to the project at: 

Marshfield High School 
10th & Ingersoll 
Coos Bay OR 97420 

Thank you for your support!

Marshfield High School continues to be a major partner in the cemetery’s care.


Donations received for this project are deposited in a designated fund at the school. 



Current view of Marshfield Pioneer Cemetery entrance
Current view of entrance and chain-link fence topped by barbed wire

digital rendition of cemetery entrance
Digital rendition of entrance with new gate, interpretive structures, and fence



MARSHFIELD PIONEER CEMETERY 2006


MARSHFIELD PIONEER CEMETERY 2012

Marshfield High School continues to be a major partner in the cemetery’s care.

Donations received for this project are deposited in a designated fund at the school. 



CEMETERY PLANS TALKED OVER*

Historically, the cemetery served as the Coos Bay region’s primary burying ground in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries -- a place where the community could pay its respects to local citizens or just enjoy the natural setting. The Marshfield I.O.O.F. Cemetery Association first considered fencing the cemetery in 1913, as the article from the Coos Bay Times indicates. By the 1930s, however, the cemetery was falling into disrepair and has continued to suffer from periodic bouts of neglect and vandalism. Thirty years ago, in 1983, the cemetery was enclosed with “an eight-foot-high fence with barbed wire on top and a new gate” that was meant to limit visitors “to those persons having a legitimate purpose.” Perhaps this decision did deter some vandalism in the cemetery, but it also helped to turn the cemetery from a community focal point to a forgotten and forbidden place.

With community support, the condition of cemetery has improved in the last decade: a database makes it possible to locate those buried in the cemetery, attractive signs have been donated and installed at the cemetery, volunteers have removed invasive species from the landscape, and the City of Coos regularly cuts the grass. Now, p
lans are underway to consider new fencing, a gate, and interpretive signs. It is hoped that these improvements will demonstrate the community’s continuing commitment to the cemetery’s care and welcome the increasing number of visitors who visit this sacred place each year. Collaboration with the City, Marshfield High School, veterans' and other civic groups, as well as relatives who can be contacted will be essential in order to accomplish the project. To help with funding, a grant from the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will be sought.


*CEMETERY PLANS TALKED OVER" is from the Coos Bay Times,  June 11, 1913, page 1. 


A brochure may be downloaded on the Downloadable Files page.