Carrot Cake Recipe Nigella

    carrot cake
  • Carrot cake is a cake which consists of grated carrot mixed with batter. The carrot softens in the cooking process, and the cake usually has a soft, dense texture. The carrots themselves enhance the flavor, texture and appearance of the cake.
  • The Carrot Cake is a cocktail that is said to taste like carrot cake, although it does not contain any carrot cake ingredients. It is a shooter drink composed of one third Bailey's Irish Cream, one third Hot Damn Cinnamon Schnapps and one third Frangelico.
  • A popular American cake that is very moist and normally frosted with cream cheese frosting. Oil is normally used in place of butter when making the cake batter, along with grated carrots, raisins, nuts, and spices. See recipe for Carrot Cake.
  • A plant of a genus that includes love-in-a-mist
  • Ancestral Oil used by Pharaohs. Also called the "blessed seed", rich with vitamins, minerals and fatty acids, it is universally known for being beneficial for dry, sensitive or irritated skin: to reduce inflammations due to stress, pollution, sunburn and aging.
  • any plant of the genus Nigella
  • Nigella is a genus of about 14 species of annual plants in the family Ranunculaceae, native to southern Europe, north Africa and southwest Asia. Common names applied to members of this genus are Devil-in-a-bush or Love in a mist.
  • A set of instructions for preparing a particular dish, including a list of the ingredients required
  • A medical prescription
  • directions for making something
  • A recipe is a set of instructions that describe how to prepare or make something, especially a culinary dish.
  • Something which is likely to lead to a particular outcome
  • The Recipe is the third studio album by American rapper Mack 10, released October 6, 1998 on Priority and Hoo-Bangin' Records. It peaked at number 6 on the Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums and at number 15 on the Billboard 200.. All Media Guide, LLC. Retrieved on 2010-01-01.
carrot cake recipe nigella
carrot cake recipe nigella - How to
How to Be a Domestic Goddess: Baking and the Art of Comfort Cooking
How to Be a Domestic Goddess: Baking and the Art of Comfort Cooking
Now in paperback, the cookbook in which Nigella Lawson shows us how to release the domestic goddess inside each of us
"The trouble with much modern cooking is not that the food it produces isnt good, but that the mood it induces in the cook is one of skin-of-the-teeth efficiency, all briskness and little pleasure. Sometimes that's the best we can manage, but at other times we dont want to feel like a postmodern, postfeminist, overstretched woman but, rather, like a domestic goddess, trailing nutmeggy fumes of baking pie in our languorous wake . . ."
How to Be a Domestic Goddess, filled with more than 220 lavishly illustrated recipes, makes cooking and baking as luxurious as it should be, with recipes for cakes, pies, pastries, and breads, and feeds our fantasies of making sumptuous treats at home.

While the title How to Be a Domestic Goddess may at first make a modern woman bristle, the book itself is just as likely to inspire the woman who brings home the bacon to start baking cakes. And what's wrong with that? "This isn't a dream," writes British cookery deity Nigella Lawson in her preface. "What's more, it isn't even a nightmare." Lawson--the author of How to Eat, food editor of British Vogue, and star of her own TV cooking show, Nigella Bites--has been suspected of upholding the woman-laboring-in-the-kitchen paradigm, but there are lots of hard-working women out there who derive great satisfaction from cooking, even after a long day at the office. For those women, Lawson, who looks more Elizabeth Hurley than Martha Stewart, is the perfect guide to the wondrous world of baking.
"You know, I'm not a cook-to-impress kind of girl," Lawson says midway through the book, but she must admit there are few things more rewarding than putting a warm homemade pie or fragrant cake on the table--especially after preparing a home-cooked meal. How to Be a Domestic Goddess: Baking and the Art of Comfort Cooking makes just such a reward possible, in fact positively enticing, with its delicious selection of easy-to-make cakes, pies, cookies, breads, even jams, presented in Lawson's chatty, pleasantly glib manner. Turns out, you don't have be a Pierre Herme to make to-die-for chocolate confections; nor do you have to spend hours "faffing around" with hot pans and jars to have jam at teatime. You just need to try baking once, then again, and next thing you know, you'll be turning out cookies and desserts every chance you get. Many of the recipes are hand-me-downs or adaptations from other sources, be it a favorite cookbook or a restaurant in some far-off region, but all are imbued with Lawson's wit and distinctive touch. Profiteroles, My Way are "monumentally impressively better" than the original, thanks to burnt-sugar custard and toffee sauce. Her Coffee and Walnut Splodge Cookies are "American-style cookies; in other words just dropped onto the baking sheet free-form," and so on.
A sophisticated female alter ego of British mop-top Jamie Oliver, and considerably more sly and comedic than most American gourmets, Nigella is sure to convince more than a few up-and-coming hostesses that baking is indeed women's work. --Rebecca Wright

Transient pleasures
Transient pleasures
A courgette cake (yes, I know it sounds odd, but trust me, it is delicious - just think carrot cake and you're on the right track) filled with home made lime curd and topped with lime cream cheese icing. I can't take credit for the recipe - I bow before the fabulous Nigella Lawson for inspiration on this one. Not one to blow my own trumpet, but this is the best cake I've ever eaten. In fact I made this for a birthday and it disappeared almost instantly making me wish I'd baked two so I could scoff one all by myself. Yes, I know that's greedy but if you tried this cake you'd know what I mean. You'll find the recipe in Nigella's Domestic Goddess book.
290/365 - Move over, Nigella Lawson...
290/365 - Move over, Nigella Lawson...
Inspired by the arrival of my rather sexy new food processor, I spring into Nigella Lawson mode, and decide to make a cake using a recipe from the cookbook included with the machine... However, thinking about it is as far as I get, because polenta is obviously FAR too exotic an ingredient for the likes of us carrot-crunchers, and Tesco fail to come up with the goodies. I shall have to go on An Expedition at the weekend to track some down, but in the meantime, for your delight and delectation in true Nigella styleee (minus the sultry smirks to camera) are the remainder of my chosen ingredients in sexy soft focus Orton-effect... Watch this space...
carrot cake recipe nigella
How to Eat: The Pleasures and Principles of Good Food
"A chatty, sometimes cheeky,celebration of home-cooked meals."
—USA Today
Through her wildly popular television shows, her five bestselling cookbooks, her line of kitchenware, and her frequent media appearances, Nigella Lawson has emerged as one of the food world's most seductive personalities. How to Eat is the book that started it all—Nigella's signature, all-purpose cookbook, brimming with easygoing mealtime strategies and 350 mouthwatering recipes, from a truly sublime Tarragon French Roast Chicken to a totally decadent Chocolate Raspberry Pudding Cake. Here is Nigella's total (and totally irresistible) approach to food—the book that lays bare her secrets for finding pleasure in the simple things that we cook and eat every day.
"[Nigella] brings you into her life and tells you how she thinks about food, how meals come together in her head . . . and how she cooks for family and friends . . . A breakthrough . . . with hundreds of appealing and accessible recipes."
—Amanda Hesser, The New York Times
"Nigella Lawson serves up irony and sensuality with her comforting recipes . . . the Queen of Come-On Cooking."
—Los Angeles Times
"Nigella Lawson is, whisks down, Britain's funniest and sexiest food writer, a raconteur who is delicious whether detailing every step on the way towards a heavenly roast chicken and root vegetable couscous or explaining why 'cooking is not just about joining the dots.'"
—Richard Story, Vogue magazine

"Cooking is not about just joining the dots, following one recipe slavishly and then moving on to the next," says British food writer Nigella Lawson. "It's about developing an understanding of food, a sense of assurance in the kitchen, about the simple desire to make yourself something to eat." Lawson is not a chef, but "an eater." She writes as if she's conversing with you while beating eggs or mincing garlic in your kitchen. She explains how to make the basics, such as roast chicken, soup stock, various sauces, cake, and ice cream. She teaches you to cook more esoteric dishes, such as grouse, white truffles (mushrooms, not chocolate), and "ham in Coca-Cola." She gives advice for entertaining over the holidays, quick cooking ("the real way to make life easier for yourself: cooking in advance"), cooking for yourself ("you don't have to belong to the drearily narcissistic learn-to-love-yourself school of thought to grasp that it might be a good thing to consider yourself worth cooking for"), and weekend lunches for six to eight people. Don't expect any concessions to health recommendations in the recipes here--Lawson makes liberal and unapologetic use of egg yolks, cream, and butter. There are plenty of recipes, but the best parts of How to Eat are the well-crafted tidbits of wisdom, such as the following:
"Cook in advance and, if the worse comes to the worst, you can ditch it. No one but you will know that it tasted disgusting, or failed to set, or curdled or whatever."

On the proper English trifle: "When I say proper I mean proper: lots of sponge, lots of jam, lots of custard and lots of cream. This is not a timid construction ... you don't want to end up with a trifle so upmarket it's inappropriately, posturingly elegant. A degree of vulgarity is requisite."

"Too many people cook only when they're giving a dinner party. And it's very hard to go from zero to a hundred miles an hour. How can you learn to feel at ease around food, relaxed about cooking, if every time you go into the kitchen it's to cook at competition level?"

--Joan Price