REGISTRY REPAIR 5 - REPAIR 5

Registry repair 5 - Computer repair business card.

Registry Repair 5


registry repair 5
    registry repair
  • Registry Repair is the process of identifying the missing and invalid references in your Windows registry and fixing it to optimize your PCs performance.
    5
  • five: the cardinal number that is the sum of four and one
  • It is an irrational algebraic number. The first sixty significant digits of its decimal expansion are: which can be rounded down to 2.236 to within 99.99% accuracy. As of April 1994, its numerical value in decimal had been computed to at least one million digits.
  • five: being one more than four
registry repair 5 - New Digital
New Digital Innovations Dvddr Repair Kit Rejuvenating Fluid Special Drying Cloth For Optical Media
New Digital Innovations Dvddr Repair Kit Rejuvenating Fluid Special Drying Cloth For Optical Media
Mechanized Repair Device includes FlexiWheel. Rejuvenating fluid, special drying cloth, felt buffing square, detailed instruction manual. Disc Repair System fixes scratches that cause a disc to skip, freeze, and fail to play. Manual repair process smoothes surface scratches to renew the disc's protective layer. Leaving disc data unaffected. Patented FlexiWheel repairs up to 50 discs, and works gently enough to safely repair the same disc multiple times. Not for use with Blu-ray or Playstation 3.

86% (10)
1946 HMT Cameronia Voyage Record
1946 HMT Cameronia Voyage Record
1946 HMT Cameronia Voyage Record. Cameronia was built for the Anchor Line, which was owned by Cunard Line. She was a sister ship to Lancastria. Although she was launched in December 1919, a strike delayed her final completion. In April 1921, Cameronia was towed to Cherbourg, France for final fitting out. She had accommodation for 265 1st class, 370 2nd class and 1,100 3rd class passengers. Cameronia departed Glasgow on 11 May 1921 on her maiden voyage to Liverpool and New York. Cameronia was placed under the management of the Henderson Brothers Ltd. Her port of registry was Glasgow. The Code Letters KHSQ and United Kingdom Official Number 144242 were allocated. In October 1925, Cameronia rescued the crew of a United States Coast Guard cutter that had caught fire. She was in collision with the Norwegian steamship Hauk the following month. Her steering gear failed on a voyage in January 1926 and she returned to Glasgow for repairs. In August 1926, a collision with Cunard's Samaria was avoided by 6 feet (1.8 m). Cameronia underwent a refit in 1928 to correct her tendency to pitch heavily. In 1929, another refit saw her accommodation refitted to cabin/tourist class.[4] She now had accommodation for 290 cabin class, 431 tourist class and 698 3rd class passengers. In 1934, Cameronia's Code Letters were changed to GDXS. She was laid up on the Clyde in December 1934. In 1935, the Anchor Line went into liquidation, and Cameronia was one of the assets purchased by Anchor Line (1935) Ltd. She remained laid up until the autumn of 1935, when she entered service as a troopship. In spring 1936, she was again refitted and returned to use as an ocean liner. Cameronia participated in the 1937 Spithead Naval Review. War was declared in September 1939. Cameronia departed Glasgow on 5 September. During the voyage to New York, she rescued some of the survivors from Athenia,[6] and was the first British ship to enter New York after war had been declared. Cameronia returned to the United Kingdom as part of Convoy HXF 1, which departed Halifax, Nova Scotia on 19 September 1939 and arrived at Liverpool on 29 September. Cameronia was bound for Glasgow. She made eleven unescorted round trips from Glasgow – New York in the period to December 1940, when she was requisitioned for use as a troopship. On 29 January 1941, Cameronia joined Convoy WS 5B at Freetown, Sierra Leone, sailing with the convoy to the Suez Canal, where she arrived on 3 March. Cameronia was a member of Convoy GA 10, which arrived at Alexandria, Egypt on 6 April 1941. On 23 March 1942, Cameronia departed the United Kingdom as a member of Convoy WS17, bound for Freetown. She departed Freetown on 11 April as part of Convoy WS17B bound for Cape Town, South Africa, arriving on 23 April. On 27 April, Cameronia departed Cape Town as part of Convoy WS 17 bound for Mombasa, Kenya, where she arrived on 8 May. On 10 May Cameronia departed Mombasa as part of Convoy WS 17BZ, arriving at Bombay, India on 19 May.] On 29th - 30th May 1941 in company with the Glen Line's Glengyle 6,000 Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders were evacuated from Sphakia at the end of the Battle of Crete. Cameronia served in the Mediterranean as an Infantry Landing Ship during the war, taking part in the British-American invasion of French North Africa in November 1942. On 22 December 1942, Cameronia was hit by a torpedo dropped by a Junkers Ju 88 of III Gruppe, KG 26 off Algiers, Algeria. A 288 square feet (26.8 m2) hole was blown in Cameronia's side[14] and seventeen people were killed.[4] U-565 also claimed to have damaged her. Cameronia managed to reach the port of Bougie, Algeria, from where she was escorted at 5 knots (9.3 km/h) to Algiers. She then sailed to Gibraltar where temporary repairs were carried out. Cameronia then sailed to Glasgow for permanent repairs. Repairs were completed in June 1943 and Cameronia was then returned to service. On 29 August 1943, Cameronia departed Gibraltar as part of Convoy MKF 22, which had departed from Port Said, Egypt on 19 August and arrived at the Clyde on 9 September. On 6 December 1943, Cameronia departed Oran, Algeria with members of the 21st General Hospital. They were landed at Naples, Italy on 21 December. Cameronia was the largest troopship that took part in Operation Overlord in June 1944. She served until the end of the war, when she was laid up. In 1947, Cameronia was returned to service on trooping duties to Palestine. In 1948, she was refitted by Barclay, Curle & Co Ltd, Elderslie, giving her accommodation for 1,266 passengers in a single class. She was used to transport people emigrating to Australia. In 1953, Cameronia was sold to the MoTT and was renamed Empire Clyde, remaining under the management of Anchor Line. She served until 1957, arriving on 22 October at Newport, Monmouthshire for scrapping.
The Star of Alaska
The Star of Alaska
On January 15, 1887, with a twenty-six-man crew, Balclutha sailed under British registry from Cardiff, Wales, on her maiden voyage. She was bound for San Francisco. The ship entered the Golden Gate after 140 days at sea, unloaded her cargo of 2,650 tons of coal, and took on sacks of California wheat. This photo, ringed by portraits of Captain Constable and his crew, was taken on San FranciscoBay in June, 1887. Because of the months-long ocean voyage, Balclutha made only one round-trip per year while engaged in the Europe-to-San Francisco grain trade. She arrived with a cargo three times, but also brought pottery, cutlery, Scotch whisky (from Glasgow and Liverpool) and "Swansea general" (tinplate, coke and pig iron) to San Francisco. During the mid-1890s the ship called at other ports around the world; in New Zealand, for example, she loaded wool and tallow for London, England. In 1899 Balclutha was transferred to Hawaiian registry, and she joined the bustling Pacific Coast lumber trade. For three years the ship sailed north to Puget Sound, Washington, and then across to Australia. Much of the 1.5 million board feet she could carry ended up underground, used for mining timbers in the Broken Hill Mine at Port Pirie, Australia. Balclutha was the last vessel to fly the flag of the Hawaiian Kingdom. In 1901 a special act of the United States Congress admitted the ship to American registry so that she could engage in "coastwise" trade (i.e. between American ports). Soon thereafter, the Alaska Packers Association, a San Francisco firm which harvested and canned salmon, chartered her to carry men and supplies north – to Alaska. When Balclutha went aground in 1904, the Alaska Packers Association purchased her where she lay for the non-princely sum of $500. After extensive repairs, they renamed her Star of Alaska.

registry repair 5
Comments