CARPET CLEANING TECHNIQUES : CARPET CLEANING

CARPET CLEANING TECHNIQUES : HOW TO CLEAN A TEA POT : MY CLEANING LADY.

Carpet Cleaning Techniques


carpet cleaning techniques
    carpet cleaning
  • Carpet cleaning, for beautification, and the removal of stains, dirt, grit, sand, and allergens can be achieved by several methods, both traditional and modern.
  • (carpet cleaner) foam or liquid soap used on rugs and carpets
    techniques
  • A way of carrying out a particular task, esp. the execution or performance of an artistic work or a scientific procedure
  • A skillful or efficient way of doing or achieving something
  • (technique) proficiency: skillfulness in the command of fundamentals deriving from practice and familiarity; "practice greatly improves proficiency"
  • Skill or ability in a particular field
  • (technique) a practical method or art applied to some particular task
  • The gameplay of the Pokemon series of role-playing video games involves the capture and training of a variety of fictional creatures called "Pokemon" and using them to battle other trainers.
carpet cleaning techniques - Pet Odor
Pet Odor Removal Solutions: Simple Home Remedy Tips & Pet Training Techniques to Effectively Stop Pet Odors in Your Home
Pet Odor Removal Solutions: Simple Home Remedy Tips & Pet Training Techniques to Effectively Stop Pet Odors in Your Home
Pets are wonderful to have in the home... but pet odors are not so great!

No matter how much you love your pet, living with pet odors is not acceptable. The smell of their urine or poop can linger on your clothing, linens, carpet, furnishings that after a while your entire house smells like a kennel, and that's aside from the germs they can carry which can result to health problems to your family.

Removing pet odors is not a task anyone likes. It can be frustrating, especially if your pet keeps slipping up over and over again. This book will give out a number of pet odor removal solutions easily and permanently.

* Cleaning pet urine smell & stains, getting rid of poop smell and other common pet odors in the home
* Techniques that really work for potty dog training, litter box training
* Quick and easy home remedies made out of common ingredients
* Popular cleaning products that really work

You can get rid of smelly pet odors quickly and easily...forever!

Pets are wonderful to have in the home... but pet odors are not so great!

No matter how much you love your pet, living with pet odors is not acceptable. The smell of their urine or poop can linger on your clothing, linens, carpet, furnishings that after a while your entire house smells like a kennel, and that's aside from the germs they can carry which can result to health problems to your family.

Removing pet odors is not a task anyone likes. It can be frustrating, especially if your pet keeps slipping up over and over again. This book will give out a number of pet odor removal solutions easily and permanently.

* Cleaning pet urine smell & stains, getting rid of poop smell and other common pet odors in the home
* Techniques that really work for potty dog training, litter box training
* Quick and easy home remedies made out of common ingredients
* Popular cleaning products that really work

You can get rid of smelly pet odors quickly and easily...forever!

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09 May 08 Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri
09 May 08 Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri
A collection of short stories that read like a few chapters from the lives of people the reader has known vaguely for a long time. Being a new mother, Lahiri perhaps draws on her experiences both as a daughter and a mother, a technique that is reminiscent of Amy Tan’s writing. Unlike her previous writings, this time Lahiri manages to create a sense of empathy for the character, with all their flaws and selfish shortcomings. [SPOILER ALERT] Unaccustomed Earth A glimpse into the lives of a rather selfish pregnant daughter, and her equally self centered father – Ruma initially wants to discourage her father from moving into her house and her life. The father comes for a visit and seeing his homely skills, Ruma changes her mind and voluntarily invites him to live with her family. Dear Daddy refuses of course, he has his hands full with a tepid romance and a new passion for traveling. The story leans heavily on Ruma’s relationship with her son and her now deceased mother. Ruma’s pregnancy also plays a large role in the story. Ruma’s absent husband Adam is unrealistically non-committal about the possibility of his father-in-law moving in. A few discrepancies strike jarring notes here and there though. Ruma’s father was obviously suffering from belated guilt as having “forsaken” his parents in India – a fact that was obvious enough to the reader, and yet Lahiri had to spell it out word by word. Next, Rumi’s father, supposedly tired of his household responsibilities and looking forward to a solitary life, goes into considerable trouble planting a garden for Rumi, though he had no intention of staying to tend to it. Worst of all, he plants his grandson’s toys in a corner of the garden, promising trees laden with toys, and then leaves without a backward glance at his cherished Neel. Strange acts for a good father and a loving grandfather. Hell-Heaven A chapter of foregone conclusions. A rather ordinary love triangle, spiced up by Lahiri’s writing style of course, in which an adult recalls her mother’s one-sided love affair with a younger man. Pranab, a lonely but academically brilliant young man meets the narrator’s mother and subsequently her father and gets vaguely adopted by the family as a younger brother. Pranab spent all of his time with this family, eating “boudi’s” Bengali food, arguing passionately about Indian movies and Indian actors. The narrator’s father is of course depicted as a typical introvert highbrow scientist, with little time or inclination for such frivolous discussions. Neither the narrator nor her mother bothered to take the time to draw him out of his shell, proceeding instead, to fall in love, the mother with Pranab, and the daughter with Pranab’s girlfriend Deborah. The narrator’s father, true to his stereotyped character, doesn’t miss any opportunity for neglecting his lonely and bored housewife. miss any opportunity for neglecting his lonely and bored housewife, who falls deeper and deeper in love with Pranab. After meeting Deborah, the blissfully ignorant Pranab has little time for his adopted family. Deborah makes some effort to get closed to his adopted family, appearing a little too good to be true at times. The narrator’s mother keeps waiting for the affair to blow over and for Pranab to come back to her for consolation. However, Pranab opts to marry Deborah, with a show of callous disregard for the wishes of his parents back in India. This is where the reader gets the second proof of Pranab’s irresponsible nature. The narrator’s mother does not lose any opportunity for bad mouthing Deborah. The reader rather pities the narrator’s father for having to put up with this petty wife of his. Deborah gradually weanes Pranab away from all his Bengali friends, all the while paying pretty lip service to these friends, including the narrator. Fast forward fourteen years and we see the marriage at an end – Pranab having been unfaithful to Deborah, contrary to all built up expectations for the reverse. The narrator’s mother has miraculously transformed into a broad minded educated mature woman, thanks to her degree in library science, a university education apparently being the panacea for all that ails a lonely, bored and unhappy housewife. With Lahiri being in her usual haste to end the story, the reader finds mother and daughter reconciled, husband and wife having “grown fond of each other”, and the now mature narrator happily embarking on one affair after another with American men, all in the space of a single paragraph. As with the previous story, the bond between a mother and her child runs strong throughout the narration. The reason is perhaps Lahiri’s own recent motherhood. The reader hears nothing further about the middle-aged Peter Pan Pranab. Deborah is seen unaccountably clinging to Pranab’s adopted Boudi instead of her own close-knit family. The narrator’s mother reveals the story of her own closure towards Pranab to her daughter as a proof of the close bonding be
What's on your mind? Worm?
What's on your mind? Worm?
Thinking about worm infection. Jr will be 4 years old but I've never given him any medication for it. His doc recommended it since he was 2 but I didn't see any symptoms or need for it. Bur now, he bites his nails, loosing appetites, and what worries me is that he takes a disliking for milk... I'm worried. Found this article on the net... just for a reading... and easy retrace should i need it later... :) Threadworm infection FRONT PAGE THE TREATMENT OF THREADWORM INFECTION TINA GREEN, PRACTICE NURSE, ROBIN HOOD HEALTH CENTRE, SUTTON, SURREY AND ROBERT SHORT, MEDICAL WRITER Introduction Threadworms (Enterobius vermicularis) or ‘pinworms’ look like wriggling pieces of white cotton thread. They are about 2-13 mm long. They live in the rectum and are generally harmless, although there can be some rare complications that the nurse should be aware of. They are especially common in children but can spread to all the family. It does not matter how financially well off or what social class the family is from (Gutierrez, 1990; Russell, 1991), everyone can get the infection. Note that the infection is not ‘got from the cat’, as some patients might believe. It is not transferred to or from animals (Prodigy, 2004). Eggs stuck under the nails or on the fingers are transferred between children in schools and nurseries or to the family at home. They easily get transferred to the mouth and some will be swallowed. The sharing of bath towels is another way in which they can be spread. They survive for up to a couple of weeks on clothing, bedding, in carpets and within household dust. The habit of thumb sucking and sucking other fingers is strongly associated with the prevalence of threadworms (Herrstrom et al 1997). Once ingested, the eggs hatch out as threadworm larvae in the small intestine. The adult worms live in the colon. Adult worms live for about 6 weeks. A female threadworm can lay up to 16,000 eggs before dying. The female adult worms, while the sufferer is inactive in sleep, move to the mouth of the anus and deposit eggs just outside it. This causes irritation around the anus and the sufferer will scratch the itching area, collect eggs on the fingers and under the nails, and this way the infection can spread to clothes and other members of the household. A common infection A decade ago in a general practice of 10,000 patients, there would be roughly 40 consultations a year for threadworm (McCormick et al, 1995), but a vast number of people will tend to treat themselves and their families by over-the-counter medications and never report the infection to their GP or practice nurse. With annual education campaigns aimed at parents and children (e.g. the Fredworm campaign during Threadworm Action Month in September 2005), awareness of threadworm infection is increasing and parents are less embarrassed at approaching their pharmacist, GP or practice nurse to discuss ‘Fredworm’. It is most common among school children aged 5-10 years old. Recent and referenced published figures in the UK appear rare in the scientific literature. NHS Direct have in the past on their website stated ‘at least 20% of all children are affected at any one time, but did not reference that statement nor is it there now. Surveys in Canada in the 1960s show a prevalence of 40-60% in schoolchildren, and 30% in preschool children (Royer and Berdnikoff, 1962). Much more recent surveys in Swedish children have put the figure at about a quarter of children 8-11 (Herrstrom et al 1997). Infection rates start to rise in October and tend to reach a peak in midwinter (Tanowitz HB et al, 1994). Nearly half the parents who report threadworm infection in their child report that the infection returns in the same year (Ibarra, 1989a). According to the Health Protection Agency’s advice to Prodigy, it is not necessary to exclude children with threadworm infection from school. (Prodigy, 2004) Symptoms of infection A tickling or itching sensation around the anal area at night is the most common symptom, but 9 out of ten sufferers will not feel this symptom (Ibarra, 1989b). Sleep may be disturbed and some children develop sore bottoms. Usually worms are only seen in the toilet, if at all. Many people will show no symptoms. In the Swedish study, 21% of children studied were symptom-free carriers of the worm (Herrstrom et al, 1997). Diagnosis The nurse or GP may occasionally be able to make the diagnosis by seeing the worms in the area around the anus. Rarely, perhaps in only 5-15% of cases, worms might be detected in stools (Cook, 1994). Tape testing which involves applying hypoallergenic tape around the anus to collect eggs/worms is no longer used as a diagnostic tool in general practice. Complications Generally there are no complications, but it is worth the nurse being alert to the possibilities. The most common complication is a sore bottom, as the skin around the anus becomes broken, and secondary infection

carpet cleaning techniques
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