1. Confederate Jean Wool Uniforms

The uniform coat for all enlisted men shall be a sack coat of gray cloth (of North Carolina Manufacture) extending half way down the thigh, and made loose, with falling collar, and an inside pocket on each breast, six coat buttons down the front, commencing at the throat; a strip of cloth sewed on each shoulder, extending from the base of the collar to the shoulder seam, an inch and a half wide at the base of the collar, and two inches wide at the shoulder; this strip will be of black cloth for Infantry, red for Artillery and yellow for Cavalry.  


    
WJ-101 NORTH CAROLINA SACK COAT (1861): Our coat is made from grey Jean Wool, Your choice Natural Grey or Salt and Pepper Grey.  Standard with black cotton lining. Shoulders are faced in black, red or yellow wool.  Standard with NC State Brass or Block “I, A, C” or dished wood buttons sewn on ( your choice of wood or brass ). Comes with all visible seams including button holes done by hand, along with some inner work done by hand. Other Jean Wool colors optional.
Up to Size 46: $92.00, Size 48 – 54: $100.00, Size 56 – 60: $110.00, Size 62 - 66 chest $130.00

OPTIONS: 

ADD $10.00 extra for piece dyed wool jean

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on

.


North Carolina was a widely used jacket. As North Carolina troops saw action on both the eastern and western fronts. it is perhaps one of the only ones that may have been universally issued to both Armies. The jackets used by the Army of Tennessee were of Jean cloth, with again the standard osnaburg lining, with a six-button front. It was similar to the Columbus, but slightly shorter in the body. The Army of Tennessee had these issued at Dalton, Georgia, in the winter of 1863/64, and again at Palmetto, Georgia, in September 1864. 


Charlotte Depot PatternNorth Carolina Depot Pattern

North Carolina maintained a private depot in Richmond where State troops were issued clothing from.   On February 10, 1862, Assistant Quartermaster Major John Devereux wrote to a firm (Garrett) with which the state of NC had contracts, "I will be obliged ...if you will cut no more coats but cut all jackets, a sample will be sent you in a few days." Hence, the sack coat was modified by removing the skirts and turning it into a six button jacket. The falling collar and shoulder trim were retained on this garment. The next stage in the modification of the state jacket occurred during the spring/summer of 1862 with the elimination of the colored shoulder trim and the replacement of the fall collar by a more orthodox standing collar, making a "second pattern" plain six-button jacket. This type was issued until the end of the war. 





WJ-102 NORTH CAROLINA JACKET ( PATTERN 2 ): Your choice of Jean Wool color, Natural Grey, Salt and Pepper Medium Grey, Taupe, or Light Brown.  NC State Seal buttons or Block I, A, C sewn on ( 2 hole dished or brass your choice )  All visible seams including button holes are done by hand. Sleeve lining at armpit is also set by hand.   Your choice of Colored Lining, Off White, Brown, Black, or checked Diamond Pattern Blue/white, Black/white, Green/white, Red/white, Yellow/white Cotton your choice.   Standard with hand Top Stitching on seams. 
Up to Size 46: $84.00, Size 48 – 54: $90.00, Size 56 – 60: $96.00, Size 62 - 66 Price $106.00

OPTIONS: 
 $8.00 Less for a machine made coat, with hand done button holes.
$10.00 extra for piece dyed wool jean.

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on



THE CHARLESTON DEPOT JACKET

The Department of South Carolina, Georgia,. and Florida had a clothing depot at Charleston, SC. Details on its establishment are foggy, but the Chief Quartermaster, Major Hutson Lee, had been on the job since 1861 and at some point established a manufacturing facility. Captain George L. Crafts was in charge. An Assistant Quartermaster in Charleston (at least as early as February, 1863) by June, 1864 Crafts was using as his address: "Bureau of Clothing and Camp and Garrison Equipage." He was officially placed in charge of the "Established Manufactory," on 8 November 1864 by the order of the Adjutant and Inspector General. At that point, his depot became one of the general depots, whose operations and issues were under the exclusive control of the Quartermaster General.

Records of this operation are extremely fragmentary, although there is strong evidence, over and above the name assigned to the facility, that clothing was indeed manufactured. Crafts transferred the following stores to Captain R. Ward, at Adams Run, SC on 7 February 1863:  528   Melton Shirts, 240 Jeans Pants, 11  Blue Cloth Pants, 486  Caps, 180  Pr Shoes.  In December, 1864, Crafts sent 200 Jackets and 200 Pairs of Pants to Captain C.L. Davies, AQM, Greenville, SC.

Identifying the products of this depot is extremely difficult, but there are two surviving jackets that may be from Craft's operation. One was used by 1st Sergeant T. Grange Simons of the 25th South Carolina Infantry. This regiment was stationed in the Charleston area until early 1864, when they were transferred to Lee's army. They came back to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida in late 1865.85  The other jacket was worn by Private William Kirby Brown of the Palmetto Guard. His unit served as siege artillery until the evacuation of Charleston in the spring of 1865, when they transferred north as part of Johnston's army and surrendered at Greensboro, NC, 26 April 1865.

Both jackets are made of the English wool kersey found in both the Richmond Type III jackets and the Tait contract. Both have linings made of unbleached cotton osnaburg. However, these jackets have six piece bodies with one piece, rather than two piece sleeves, and only five buttons down the front. Simons' jacket has block I buttons imported by Courtney & Tenant of Charleston, while Brown's has CS staff buttons made by Hammond, Turner & Bates of Manchester, England. Neither jacket has shoulder straps. Unlike Richmond products, the collars of these jackets are interlined. Finally, and perhaps the most conspicuous feature, other than the button count and the lack of shoulder straps, are the belt loops. Unlike any other pattern, these belt loops are extremely large, 4 1/8" high by 1 3/4" wide on Simons' jacket and 5 5/ 8" high by 2 5/8" wide on Brown's. Moreover, these loops are. shaped like shoulder straps, flat at one end and tapering towards the top.



WJ- Charleston depot. Shell Jacket Wool Jean Cloth in your choice of colors.  For 100% wool Uniforms look at our C.S. wool uniforms page.
 Five buttons sewn on front (wood or Block I,A,C or S.C. State brass your choice ). Hand Set One standard or Optional two inside patch pockets.
are the belt loops. Unlike any other pattern, these belt loops are extremely large, 4 1/8" high by 1 3/4" wide on Simons' jacket and 5 5/ 8" high by 2 5/8" wide on Brown's. Moreover, these loops are. shaped like shoulder straps, flat at one end and tapering towards the top.  All outer seams and the Button Holes are Done by Hand. 
Up to size 46: $84.00, Size 48 – 54: $90.00, Size 56 - 60: $96.00, Size 62- 66 $106.00
OPTIONS:
ADD  $10.00 Less for a machine sewn jacket, Standard with Hand done Button Holes.
ADD $10.00 for piece dyed wool jean. 

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on

  

The depot at Columbus was described at one point as the largest in the Confederacy.   Certainly it was an important depot. Its products probably saw service in every theater of the war, and it continued to function uninterrupted until Columbus fell in April, 1865. Major F.W. Dillard was the Quartermaster. A report for the 4th Quarter, 1863 showed 13,036 jackets already on hand, 6,455 purchased and 23,194 manufactured, for a grand total of 42,752. The manufactured total would indicate a yearly production of about 92,000.

The depot at Athens was established by one of Bragg's quartermasters, Major Lemuel O. Bridewell, after the 1862 Kentucky campaign. Bridewell was ordered to take the wool and other manufactured goods acquired in Kentucky and begin producing clothing with it.   By July, 1863, he was able to ask the Quartermaster General if he should issue the 10,000 complete suits he had on hand to Bragg's Army, in line with Bragg's request.

Unfortunately, it is not at this point possible to differentiate with confidence between the products of these three depots. Apparently they were very similar. All three depots used woolen jeans for the basic material, and osnaburg for linings. Several groups of western uniforms survive, and on the basis of their histories it may be possible to at least narrow their possible source to one or two depots.

THE COLUMBUS DEPOT JACKET


One rather large group of jackets is represented by at least six examples, in two variations, all but one with histories tying them to the Kentucky Orphan Brigade. They date from as early as November, 1862 to the end of the war.

These jackets are made of a butternut colored wool jean, probably originally gray wool on an unbleached cotton warp. They have medium blue wool kersey or wool flannel collars, and straight cuffs made of the same material. Linings are made of the standard cotton osnaburg. Most have a six button front, although one has five and one has seven. What appears to be the earlier group has pockets on the inside only, while the latter group has one exterior pocket.

For this group, unlike for most Confederate uniforms, we have a diary description that matches the pattern relatively closely. Washington Ives of the 4th Florida Infantry, noted on 21 October 1863: "Our Regt. is just drawing some excellent clothing; jackets of gray, blue cuffs..." A few days later, he described them in more detail: "...The coats are dark and light gray (mostly with blue collars and cuffs)..it is worsted cross between Cassimere and Jeans, very warm and desirable... "

A photograph of two Confederate prisoners, taken on Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, probably in November, 1863, shows this same pattern.

Although one cannot be absolutely sure, the only large depot known to have distributed clothing as widely as would have been necessary to reach the units noted here, over this long a period of time, appears to have been Columbus. Therefore, a very tentative attribution of these jackets to that depot is made here. Those without exterior pockets are designated Columbus Type I while those with exterior pockets are designated Type II.


FIG 25
Columbus Depot jacket 
worn by Pvt. Elijah C. Woodward,
Co C, 9th Kentucky Infantry

The earliest jacket in this group, a Columbus Type I, was worn by Private Elijah C. Woodward, Co. "C," 9th Kentucky Infantry (FIG 25). Woodward enlisted in September, 1861 and deserted in November, 1862. His jacket has a five button front, and two inside pockets in the right and left breasts.

The next jacket chronologically, also a Type I, was used by John McDonnell, Company G,1 st Mississippi Light Artillery. McDonnell enlisted 14 May 1862 and served through the Vicksburg campaign. He did not return to the army after his parole on 4 July 1863. His jacket is like Woodward's except for a six button front.98

Private David Fenimore Cooper Weller, Co. "C," 2d Kentucky Infantry, served all the way through the war. He was wounded severely at Fort Donelson. After his recovery, he was detailed to hospital duty at Forsythe, Georgia during the spring and summer of 1863. He rejoined his unit briefly in the fall of 1863, then returned to hospital duty in November and did not rejoin his company until September-October, 1864. His Type I jacket is like McDonnell's, with six button front and pockets inside the right and left breasts.99

The remaining three jackets in the group, all Type II's, have less definite histories. One was used by Private A.W. Randolph, Co. B, 6th Kentucky Infantry. Randolph, too served throughout the war, and appears on a receipt roll for clothing in December, 1864.       Another was used by John F. Jenkins of the Breckenridge Guards, a cavalry company attached to General Nathan Bedford Forrest. Finally, the history of the last jacket, which is now in the Oklahoma Historical Society, is somewhat in doubt, but it appears to have belonged to either James Dunn, 2d Missouri Infantry, Robert Reece of Forrest's Cavalry or 2nd Lt. William S. Phillips, Quartermaster, 1st Kentucky Brigade, most likely the latter.   All three of these jackets have an outside pocket on the left breast, with a large facing piece the length of the pocket and 5/8" to 1 1/2" wide across the opening. Jenkins' jacket and the Oklahoma Historical Society example have six button fronts, while Randolph's has seven.




WJ-106 COLUMBUS DEPOT JACKET TYPE-I:  Made from natural gray jean wool, with blue kersey collar and cuff facing. Other color variations optional. Comes with one row of top hand stitching on collar, cuff, down on front and all around the bottom. Two pockets set in the lining are also Hand Sewn. Hand Done Button Holes.  Your choice of dished 2 hole wood buttons or stamped brass CS buttons sewn on.
Up to Size 46: $84.00, Size 48 – 54: $90.00, Size 56 – 60: $96.00  Size 62 - 66 Price  $106.00
OPTIONS: 
ADD $10.00 extra for piece dyed wool jean.

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on

WJ-107 COLUMBUS DEPOT JACKET TYPE-II: Natural gray, taupe, or light brown wool jean, with blue kersey collar and cuff. Lined in muslin, with one pockets set in the lining and one outer slash pocket. Other features are same as for Columbus Depot Type-I jacket.
Up to Size 46: $84.00, Size 48 – 54: $90.00, Size 56 – 60: $96.00,  Size 62 -66 Price $106.00 

OPTIONS: ADD $10.00 extra for piece dyed wool jean.  

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on



 

WJ-108 WESTERN DEPOT JACKET:  no tail but straight on the back, five buttons sewn on front( wood or Block I,A,C or State brass your choice ). Hand Set two inside patch pockets. All the Button Holes are Done by Hand.
Up to size 46: $84.00, Size 48 – 54: $90.00, Size 56 - 60: $96.00, Size 62- 66: $106.00
OPTIONS:
Add. $10.00 for hand top stitching on jacket, with Hand done Button Holes.
ADD $10.00 for piece dyed wool jean. 
Add $6.00 for colored Collar and Cuff 

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on

WJ-110 MOBILE DEPOT/MYSTERY JACKET: Comes with top hand stitching that goes down on front and around the bottom, with single row of top hand stitching on solid collar and cuff. Also the unusual wide facing of the outer slash pocket that is also top hand stitched. Any block CS brass or wood buttons sewn on. Jacket is lined in cotton muslin. Your choice of jean wool, mostly comes in natural gray.
Up to Size 46: $92.00, Size 48 – 54: $98.00, Size 56 – 60: $104.00, Size 62 - 66 $115.00
OPTIONS: ADD $10.00 for piece dyed wool jean.

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on


DEPARTMENT OF ALABAMA JACKETS

The last group of jackets to be covered here are all associated with units of the Army of Tennessee that were assigned to Richard Taylor's Department of Alabama after the abortive Nashville campaign. Taylor noted the efforts to resupply these troops in his memoirs as occurring in February, 1865.

All of these jackets are made of woolen jean, with a six piece body and two piece sleeves. All have linings of cotton osnaburg, and all have collars made of dark blue wool jeans, (dark blue woolen weft on a brown cotton warp). All have five button fronts, and all have one exterior pocket, though they vary from one side of the jacket front to the other. Two have small single belt loops, shaped like shoulder straps on the left side only. One is missing the original buttons, one is missing all its buttons, but the remaining two are equipped with wooden buttons like those seen on the Columbus jackets. Taylor's main source of supply, particularly to troops on the Meridian, Mississippi- Mobile, Alabama line appears to have been the large depot operating at Columbus, Mississippi. In July, 1864, the Quartermaster there, Major W.J. Anderson, was disbursing approximately $130,000 per month. He boasted that "...The clothing material is excellent and the workmanship superior to any I have seen made elsewhere..." The depot at Columbus was operating as late as November, 1864, but by 15 March 1865, Anderson was being listed as a "Manufacturing Q.M." at Demopolis, Alabama. It is therefore possible that the jackets described here were made in either Columbus, Mississippi or Demopolis, Alabama." 

The jacket of John A. Dolan, Austin's Battalion, Louisiana Sharpshooters, is perhaps the best documented of the group. Written in ink in the lining is "John A. Dolan Enlisted Aug 17 1861/N.O. LA Surrendered May 12 1865 Merridian Miss. Austin Battalion Company A SHARPSHOOTERS Gibson's Brig. Clayton's Division Hardee's Corps Hood's Army  C.S.A." and "May 1865 J.A.DOLAN C.S.A."


FIG 26
Department of Alabama jacket worn by 
Thomas Jefferson Beck, 
Fenner's Louisiana Battery

The jacket worn by Private Thomas Jefferson Beck of Fenner's Louisiana Battery is virtually identical to Dolan's, except that it is interlined, while Dolan's is not (FIG 26). Fenner's Battery was requesting an extensive amount of new clothing on 17 March 1865, while stationed at Mobile.  The Beck jacket has wooden buttons, as does one believed to have been worn by a member of the 31st Mississippi.  Finally, a jacket exists that was worn by a J. Donald or J. McDonald, described as being a member of the "Missouri Infantry." The only J. Donald found to fit this description was J.M. Donald, Co. I, 6th Missouri Infantry. However, he was paroled at Vicksburg in 1863 and did not return to the army. However, there was a John McDonald of Co. F, 8th Missouri, who was paroled in New Orleans 26 May 1865, as well as a Sergeant J. A. McDonald, same company paroled at the same time and place. In addition, Lt. John F. McDonald, Co. I, 9th Missouri Infantry, was paroled at Shreveport, LA.  Of these four, it would appear that one of the two men paroled in New Orleans is the likely candidate. This jacket is identical to the others except for Confederate local staff buttons.

What appears to be a variant example of this pattern is the jacket worn by Silas Calmes Buck, Co. D, 12th Mississippi Cavalry.   It is virtually identical to the pattern above, except that the collar and cuffs are made of a green wool twill material. All other features are the same, including a belt loop on the left side. Buck's unit, while not part of the former Army of Tennessee, did serve in the Department of Alabama. Stationed at Pollard, Alabama in March, 1865, they were engaged at Fort Blakely near Mobile, performed guard duty during the evacuation of that city and retreated to Demopolis before being paroled at Gainesville, Alabama. There is every reason to believe, therefore, that this jacket is also a product of the same depot.

This was made without the blue collar

WJ-111 DEPARTMENT OF ALABAMA JACKET:  Six piece body, two piece sleeve. This jacket has one outer slash pocket, with dark blue jean wool facing on collar only, no facing on cuffs. Fully lined in cotton muslin. Six buttons ( wood or brass your choice ) sewn on front. All outer seams are done by hand, with hand done button holes. Your choice of wool jean color. Up to Size 46: $84.00, Size 48 – 54: $90.00, Size 56 – 60: $96.00, Size 62- 66 Price $106.00

OPTIONS:

 $10.00 Less for machine sewn coat, with Hand done Button Holes. 

ADD $10.00 extra for piece dyed jean.

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on


The Atlanta Depot is probably the best documented of these operations. It was in production at least as early as October, 1862, and was set up as the successor to the Nashville Depot, which had fallen that spring. After the fall of Atlanta, the operation appears to have been consolidated with Augusta.

The Quartermaster at Atlanta was Major V.K. Stevenson, but the depot itself functioned under Major G.W. Cunningham. An April, 1863 inspection report is the source for much of our information on this depot, and it indicates a large operation producing upwards of 130,000 uniforms per year.


THE ATLANTA DEPOT JACKET 

A small group of three jackets appears to be tied to the Atlanta Depot. Made of a rough tabby woven wool that looks something like salt and pepper burlap, they are lined with unbleached cotton osnaburg. They have six piece bodies and one piece sleeves, and all three have a six button front. The buttons are missing from two of the jackets, but the third has wood buttons of a type observed on a number of different Western jackets and also on some from Lee's army. One of the jackets has a belt loop on the left side only. A peculiarity of this group, also observed in the Charleston pattern, is that the two front panels were apparently cut from different patterns, for the collar, which is cut the same size on both sides, comes to within about an inch of the edge of the coat on the right side, and flush with the edge on the left. The result is a collar that comes together in the center, and a right front that considerably overlaps the left. That this feature was the result of a conscious tailoring decision there can be no doubt, since it appears on all three jackets.

All of these jackets date from 1864. One was worn by Pvt. Joseph Israel Daniel of the 5th Georgia Cavalry when he was wounded on 20 June 1864 at Noonday Church, Georgia during the Atlanta campaign.  Another was the property of 1st Sgt. J. Fuller Lyon of the 19th South Carolina Infantry, Manigault's Brigade, and he had it on when wounded at Lovejoy Station, Georgia on 28 July 1864.   Finally, a jacket worn by J.B. Stanley was worn at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee, 30 November 1864. Unfortunately, Stanley has not been identified completely, but he lived after the war in Greenville, Alabama and may have served in the 22nd Alabama Infantry.   These jackets are attributed to Atlanta based on their closeness to that depot in terms of time and place. It is important to note that Daniel's unit had just come to the Georgia theater from Florida and South Carolina when he was wounded, while Lyon's unit had been serving in Tennessee. The central depot that both these units would have drawn from was Atlanta. The fact that the history of the Stanley jacket post-dates the closing of the facility by only two months argues that it may have been among the last to be issued from there





WJ-112 ATLANTA DEPOT SHELL JACKET:  Fully lined in cotton muslin. Six piece body, with pointed back and one piece sleeve. Six buttons ( wood or brass ) of your choice sewn on front.
All outer seams are Done by Hand, with hand done button holes.
Up to Size 46: $90.00, Size 48 – 54: $96.00, Size 56– 60: $102.00, Size 62 - 66: Price $110.00
OPTIONS: $10.00 Less for a machine sewn jacket, with Hand done button holes. 

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on




WJ-114 Confederate Commutation style Jacket.  Your choice of color Jean Wool Color.
Your choice lining Black, Brown, White cotton or Diamond check pattern  cotton.  
Hand sewn button holes Standard 6 button front,  We can do also do an 7-8-9 button front. 
Your choice of wood, State or Block brass  buttons.  Coat Comes with hand done button holes.    
Up to Size 46: $90.00, Size 48 – 54: $96.00, Size 56– 60: $102.00, Size 62 - 66: Price $110.00
Add $6.00 for colored collar and cuff your choice of Color.
Add $6.00 for front piping.
Add $10.00 for all seems hand Top Stitched.

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on



RICHMOND DEPOT JACKETS

FIG 1  
The three types of Richmond Depot jackets

    It is rather difficult to determine the first pattern of jacket issued by the Richmond Depot. Apparently none survive; but based on photographic evidence, and later Richmond prac­tice, it is believed that the first pattern jacket, herein designated the Richmond Depot Type I, was a jacket with a six piece body and two piece sleeves, with a nine button front, shoulder straps and probably belt loops. There were generally no buttons on the cuffs. The lining was probably a cotton osnaburg. The distinctive point about the first pattern jacket, and the feature that distinguished it from the Type II, was that it was trimmed on the collar, shoulder straps and cuffs with either tape or piping. However, because all of these details must be either gleaned from photographs or inferred from later practice, there is still much that is open to discussion. Moreover, because these jackets were produced during the official commutation period, they may very well have had in­dividual differences created by the demands of unit com­manders. An internal note written to the clothing bureau commander in 1862 is a good indication of this:

"Col. Starke wishes a stripe on the pants for his Regt. a bar on the shoulder to be added to the cost of course. You are authorized to comply with his wish..."


   More important, there is compelling evidence that this basic pattern was copied by non-government manufacturers, with the result that jackets of very similar pattern existed from the same period which were clearly not Quartermaster products. 


FIG 2
Chief Trumpeter Charles H. Powell, 
Co. F, 4th Virginia Cavalry
wearing a Richmond Depot Type I jacket

A photograph of Charles H. Powell, 4th Virginia Cavalry, taken 22 February 1862 (above) is one of the earliest pieces of evidence to show this pattern. Like later Richmond jackets, the material is rather thick and the edges appear to be top­ stitched. It appears to be made of a rather light colored gray wool. The trim on Powell's shoulder straps is tape placed on the surface of the strap, as is the collar, but the cuffs may be piped.


FIG 3
Unidentified Artillery Private 
in Richmond Depot Type I jacket

FIG 4
Sergeant Austin S. Morris (left)
and friend. Morris wears a 
Richmond Depot Type I jacket
(photo by Charles Rees in Richmond)

FIG 5
Sergeant Thomas Crowder Owens,
9th Virginia Infantry

 There exist a number of photographs of soldiers, mainly from Virginia, photographed in Richmond wearing this same jacket with either piped or taped trim, or a combination of both. An unidentified artillery private photographed by Charles Rees of Richmond shows this jacket (FIG 3), as does another Rees photograph of a pair of sergeants from Lynchburg, Virginia, Austin S. Morris and Richard A. Williams. Except for button size, the jacket worn by Morris appears to be identical to the pattern under discussion (FIG 4). A photograph of Sergeant Thomas Crowder Owens of the 9th Virginia Infantry, who was killed at Gettysburg, also shows this pattern uniform (FIG 5).

    
FIG 6 
Private William Moore and friend,
Parker's Virginia Battery, Spring 1862 in Richmond Depot Type I jackets 
  

FIG 7
Corporal Theodore C. "Doc" Howard,
Parker's battery

   
    A photograph of Private William Moore and a friend of Parker's Battery, probably taken in the Spring of 1862, shows the Type I in a rougher, darker material with tape trim (FIG 5), as does a photograph of Corporal T.C. Howard, also of Parker's Battery (FIG 6). Other photographs are known from other units showing this same pattern. All of these photographs are a strong indication that the Type I Jacket, with variations, was being produced by the Richmond Depot at least as early as February, 1862.

   Although no example of the depot product of the Type I appears to have survived, an extremely intriguing jacket does exist that is probably a tailor's copy of it. Its construction details are not typical of those later produced by the depot and appear to be more typical of a civilian tailor than those resulting from the putting-out system used by the depot. It would be logical and tempting to attribute this uniform to either a regimental issue or North Carolina state issue, and it may be. If so, however, this jacket is so strikingly similar to those in the photographs cited above, particularly those of Owens and Morris, that there must be a relationship.


FIG 8 
Jacket of Sergeant E.C.N. Green 
of the 47th North Carolina State Troops

   The jacket in question was worn by Sergeant E.C.N. Green of the 47th North Carolina State Troops, who was killed 1 July 1863 at Gettysburg (FIG 7). Sergeant Green's jacket is made of a very fine quality cadet gray cloth, and is lined in light brown silesia in the body and light blue cotton in the sleeves. It is trimmed around the collar, on the edges of the shoulder straps and at the cuffs with 1/4" dark blue cotton tape. It has eight large script "I" buttons down the front manufactured by S. Isaacs and Campbell, two small buttons of the same type at the shoulder straps, and two at each non­functioning cuff. There are no belt loops. Sergeant Green's chevrons have been separately applied, each stripe being made of 1/2" wide black velvet. The ends of the chevrons extend into the sleeve seam, indicating they were put on before the sleeves were closed. 51 These chevrons are virtually identical to those of Sergeant Morris.

  
The Richmond Depot Type II jacket is characterized by a nine-button front, no buttons on the cuffs, top-stitched edges, shoulder straps, belt loops on each hip, an unbleached cotton osnaburg lining and interior pockets. It has a six piece body and two piece sleeves. Generally, it has no trim, although examples with partial trim do exist. In the early stages of production, it was probably made concurrently with the Type I, since, after all, it is only a Type I without the trim. Gradually, however, it superceded the Type I to become the only pattern produced, until it was itself replaced by the Type III. It appears to have been produced by Captain Weisiger's operation from at least the Spring of 1862 until at least mid­1864.

   Seven of these jackets have survived, and there are a num­ber of identified and datable photographs that show them in use. Because these jackets were produced over a considerable period of time, and because they were made from materials available at different times, variations in the coat material and the number of buttons have been noted.

  
FIG 9
T
ype II Richmond jacket of Private John Blair Royal, 1st Co., Richmond howitzers.
Note the piped shoulder straps.

The example shown above was worn by Private John Blair Royal of the 1st Company, Richmond Howitzers. He had it on when he was wounded at the Battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. The left sleeve shows the mark of the incoming Union shell that hit Royal and killed another man on his gun crew. Royal apparently preserved the jacket as a souvenir of his close escape, and did not use it subsequently, for the hole shows neither a repair nor an indication of further wear. Therefore, this jacket is a rare survival from the mid part of the war, and helps to establish the dating for this pattern. Made of a rough wool/cotton combination material, it has red piping on the shoulder straps, and displays the six piece body, two piece sleeves, nine button front, plain cuffs, osnaburg lining and belt loops that characterize the pattern. 


FIG 10
Sergeant John French White
Co . K, 32nd Virginia Infantry

15 May 1863

 FIG 11
Ernest Hudgins, 
Mathews County, Virginia

A photograph of Sergeant John French White, Company K, 32d Virginia Infantry, taken 15 May 1863, shows this same pattern, and again aids in dating. (FIG 10) White had evidently drawn this jacket in February upon returning from furlough, although his regiment drew 75 jackets on 4 April and another 60 on 26 May. Whether the one in the photo was drawn in February or April, it came through the Army of Northern Virginia's main supply source, the Richmond Depot. Like the Royal jacket, it had a nine button front and shoulder straps


FIG 12 
E.A. Timberlake,
Laurel Brigade

FIG 13
Pvt Alexander Harris, 
Parker's Virginia Battery.
He was discharged 1 Nov. 1862

 FIG 14
Private C.J. Rush,
Co. E, 21st Georgia Infantry
Photo taken after 17 May 1865 
at Lincoln General Hospital

   Other photographs of Army of Northern Virginia soldiers wearing these jackets include those of Ernest Hudgins, of Mathews County, Virginia (FIG 11), E.A. Timberlake of the Laurel Brigade    (FIG 12), Alexander Hams of Parker's Battery (FIG 13) and Private C.J. Rush of the 21st Georgia   (FIG 14). In addition, there are a number of photographs of unidentified soldiers, some demonstrably taken in Richmond, that show the same jacket. 

    The photographs of Harris and Rush are of particular importance. Harris was discharged from the army 1 November 1862,  and it is likely that his photograph had been taken the previous spring when his battery was mustered in. The photograph of Rush, who was captured at Fort Stedman on 25 March 1865, was taken sometime after 17 May 1865 when he was admitted to Lincoln General Hospital in Washington, D.C. In Rush's case, the jacket may have been one which was already at the hospital when he arrived, for two photographs of Private Rush exist, and he wears a different jacket in each. As a possible indication that the jacket was not originally his, it should be noted that the buttons on the Type II Richmond jacket worn by Rush are Mississippi infantry pattern. Rush, of course, served in a Georgia regiment.


FIG 15
Confederate prisoners at White House, Virginia in June, 1864

Thus, the Type II Richmond Depot jacket may have been in production as early as the Spring of 1862, judging from Harris' picture, with the transition between the trimmed Type I and the untrimmed Type II being somewhat gradual and overlapping. The Type II was certainly in use in 1863 and 1864, based on the White photograph and also on the well known view of Confederate prisoners captured at Cold Harbor in June, 1864, in which the majority wear jackets with shoulder straps and belt loops (FIG 15). At least three of the dead Confederates photographed at Fort Mahone in April, 1865 have shoulder straps on their jackets, although the majority do not 57 Therefore, at least some of these jackets were still in service at the end of the war.

A Type II jacket worn by Private George N. Bernard of the 12th Virginia was made of a rough, dark greenish gray woolen material. The lining, however, was the cotton osnaburg to be expected in this pattern. It had a nine button front and belt loops, and once had shoulder straps. These straps had been deliberately cut off, probably during service, but the ends were still in the shoulder seam.

    
FIG 16
Richmond type II jacket

Another jacket of this same pattern, but in heavy wool cadet gray kersey surfaced in early 1988. Unfortunately without a solid history, it is believed to be a part of this group based upon the overall pattern, the button count, the shoulder straps, belt loops and lining and the fact that this kersey material saw extensive use in the Army of Northern Virginia late in the war (FIG 16).


FIG 17
Richmond Type II Jacket 
worn by William Ramsey, 17th Va. Infantry

Finally, a jacket of the same pattern, but without the belt loops is in the Smithsonian collection. Itwas worn by Private G. William Ramsey, 17th Virginia Infantry (FIG 17). Ramsey joined the 17th Virginia in November, 1863 and served until the end of the war. Clothing rolls which might date the issue of this particular jacket to Ramsey do not exist, but because he surrendered at Appomattox and apparently wore the jacket home, it probably dates to the last six months of the war. This particular jacket may be a transition piece both because it lacks belt loops and because it is made of heavy cadet gray kersey.      As will be seen, this kersey material was used almost exclusively in the Type III Richmond Depot jacket, which dates to the last part of the war. This, plus the fact that the same material is found in a group of Irish-made jackets described below, argues strongly that this gray kersey is English-made cloth run through the blockade.

   Another jacket of the same type, also without the belt loops, was used by J. Rhodes Duval of the 62d Georgia Partisan Rangers, which served in Lee's army from May until July, 1864, when it was disbanded. Duval's coat is identical to the others except that it has been trimmed with yellow wool challee. The shoulder straps have been cut off.

   Captain George Pettigrew Bryan of the 2d North Carolina Cavalry wore a Richmond Type II jacket similar to Duval's except that it was made of a rough gray tabby weave wool. Like Duval's, it has been piped, this time in a yellow worsted cord. Bryan used this jacket sometime between his promotion to captain in 1863 and his death on 16 August 1864.

   The last jacket in this group has the most radical departure from the pattern, in that it has only six buttons down the front. Made of a thin cadet gray wool with an unusual weave, it is lined with the expected osnaburg, has the belt loops and once had shoulder straps, again cut off. This jacket was worn by George H.T. Greer, Military Secretary to General Jubal A. Early. He had it on when he was wounded at Summerville Ford, Virginia on 17 September 1863.

   The troops' practice of removing shoulder straps and belt loops, seen in the Bernard, Duval and Greer jackets, may have been the impetus behind the production of the Type III. This pattern is identical to the Type II except that it lacks shoulder straps and belt loops. All of those found thus far are made of heavy cadet grey kersey. Otherwise, the pattern, lining, button count and other characteristics are identical to the Type II.

At least fourteen of these jackets survive, indicating widespread issue. This high survival rate, plus the "last uniform" rule, indicates that this must be the last pattern issued to Lee's army from the depot.  

  
FIG 18
Richmond Depot type III jacket 
worn by E.F. Barnes, 1st Co., Richmond Howitzers

The jacket worn by E.F. Barnes, 1st Company Richmond Howitzers, is a good example of the type (FIGs 19, 20). Made of cadet gray wool kersey, it is lined in the standard cotton osnaburg used by the depot. The nine buttons on the front, seven of which are Virginia state seals and two New York, are probably period replacements. The jacket shares the six piece body and two piece sleeves common to the depot.   Barnes was paroled 17 April 1865 at Richmond. 

A circular from the Adjutant & Inspector General's Office dated 3 June 1862 allowed officers to wear a fatigue uniform in the field consisting of a plain frock coat or a gray jacket, without embroidery "on the collar only." The convoluted language of this order probably meant, or at least seems to have been interpreted to mean, that only collar insignia and not sleeve braid must be worn.   An 1864 General Order allowed officers to draw enlisted clothing once all the men had been supplied.   Two examples of Type III jackets acquired in this manner by officers have survived, one with an interesting modification that allows close dating.


FIG 19 
Richmond type III jacket
worn by Brigadier General William Fitzhugh Payne

A jacket worn by Brigadier General William Fitzhugh Payne is a standard Type III with the addition of colonel's stars on the collar (FIG 21). The original infantry buttons still remain on the jacket, despite the fact that Payne was a cavalry officer.


FIG 20
Richmond type III jacket 
of Lt ThomasTolson, 
2nd Maryland Infantry

2d Lt Thomas Tolson of the 2d Maryland Infantry wore a Type III jacket adorned only with his rank insignia on the collar. The lining in Tolson's uniform is most unusual, consisting of heavy gray blanket material. A clue to this feature was Tolson's diary entry for 10 February 1865: "Pay $100 to have my jacket and pants fixed in Petersburg. The weather wet and very cold."   Otherwise Tolson's jacket is identical to the others [see Ross Kimmel's article in this issue, FIG 9 for a photograph of this jacket].

Other known Type III jackets are listed in the footnotes. All of them date from 1864 or 1865 and all are attributable to elements of the Army of Northern Virginia.

WJ-115 RICHMOND DEPOT JACKET TYPE-I: This jacket is basically supplied Machine Sewn, however, Button Holes are Hand Done. Your choice of jean wool, piped in branch of service trim color, or surface tape applied (your choice ) on collar, epaulets, and belt loops. Optional inverted V on cuffs. Fully lined in cotton muslin. Hand Done Button Holes. Buttons sewn on.
Up to Size 46: $80.00, Size 48 – 54: $86.00, Size 56 – 60: $92.00, Size 62 - 66 Price $100.00

OPTIONS: 

ADD $16.00 for Top Hand Stitching on all outer seams, including the surface tape applied by hand, with hand set sleeve lining and inside pocket.  

Add $10.00 extra for piece dyed Wool Jean.

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on





WJ-116 RICHMOND DEPOT JACKET TYPE - II: Machine sewn, with Hand done button holes. Your choice of jean wool color, with epaulets and belt loops, but no piping or surface tape.
Up to Size 46: $76.00, Size 48 – 54: $82.00, Size 56 – 60: $88.00  Size 62 - 66 Price $96.00.
OPTIONS: 
ADD $14.00 for Top Hand Stitching on all visible seams, including hand set muslin sleeve lining.
ADD $10.00 for piece dyed jean.

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on

WJ-117 RICHMOND DEPOT TYPE – III JACKET: Machine sewn, with Hand done button holes. Your choice of jean wool, epaulets and belt loops are dropped.
Up to Size 46: $72.00, Size 48 – 54: $78.00, Size 56 – 60: $84.00, Size 62- 66 Price $90.00
OPTIONS:
ADD $14.00 for Top Hand Stitching.
ADD $10.00 for piece dyed wool jean.

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on





WJ-120 SINGLE BREASTED OFFICER’S SACK COAT: Your choice of jean wool color, fold down collar, with 4 piece body and 2 piece sleeve ( one piece sleeve is also available ). Front of the coat is square with 5 - 7 buttons sewn on. Basic coat do not have any facing or piping and the back vent. However, we can make a coat with vent on back, with piping or facing on customer’s choice at extra cost. For lining, options are black polished cotton, brown cotton, muslin, and checked/plaid cotton. Coat is Machine Sewn, Button Holes are Hand Done.
Up to Size 46: $90.00, Size 48 – 54: $96.00, Size 56 – 60: $102.00, Size 62- 66 Price $110.00
OPTIONS:
Gold Soutache sleeve braid
Lieutenant: ADD $6.00 to basic coat.
Captain: ADD $10.00 to basic coat
Major to Colonel: ADD $14.00 to basic coat.
General: ADD $20.00 to basic coat price.

OPTIONS:
ADD $6.00 for collar & cuff facing.
ADD $6.00 for piping on collar and down on front edge.
ADD $6.00 for colored Lapels.
ADD $6.00 for Drooped wing CS eagle gilt buttons.
Muffin style buttons are $1.00 extra each
ADD $16.00 for a Hand Top Stitching sewn coat
ADD $12.00 for piece dyed jean.

COLLAR INSIGNIA:
ADD $6.00 for a pair of Lieutenants hand embroidered Collar Bar.
ADD $8.00 for a pair of Captains Collar Bar.
ADD $4.00 for a pair of pointed Star,
ADD $8.00 for 2 pairs,
ADD $12.00 for 3 pairs.
ADD $20.00 for Generals Collar badge.






 

 

WJ-121 DOUBLE BREASTED OFFICER’S SACK COAT: All other features are as for the above coat, except this coat comes double breasted. Your choice of jean wool color, fold down collar, with 4 piece body and 2 piece sleeve ( one piece sleeve is also available ). Front of the coat is square with 10 - 14 buttons sewn on in a Double row. Basic coat does not have any facing or piping and the back vent. However, we can make a coat with vent on back, with piping or facing on customer’s choice at extra cost. For lining, options are black polished cotton, brown cotton, muslin, and checked/plaid cotton. Coat is Machine Sewn, Button Holes are Hand Done.
Up to Size 46: $96.00, Size 48 – 54: $106.00, Size 56 – 60: $112.00, Size 62- 66 Price $120.00

OPTIONS:
Gold Soutache sleeve braid
Lieutenant: ADD $6.00 to basic coat.
Captain: ADD $10.00 to basic coat
Major to Colonel: ADD $14.00 to basic coat.
General: ADD $20.00 to basic coat price.

OPTIONS:
ADD $6.00 for collar & cuff facing.
ADD $6.00 for piping on collar and down on front edge.
ADD $6.00 for colored Lapels.
ADD $6.00 for Drooped wing CS eagle gilt buttons.
Muffin style buttons are $1.00 extra each
ADD $16.00 for a Hand Top Stitching sewn coat
ADD $12.00 for piece dyed jean.

COLLAR INSIGNIA:
ADD $6.00 for a pair of Lieutenants hand embroidered Collar Bar.
ADD $8.00 for a pair of Captains Collar Bar.
ADD $4.00 for a pair of pointed Star,
ADD $8.00 for 2 pairs,
ADD $12.00 for 3 pairs.
ADD $20.00 for Generals Collar badge.






WJ-122 SINGLE BREASTED OFFICER’S SHELL JACKET: Your choice of jean wool, with optional collar and front edge piping at extra cost. One to two inner patch pockets, outer slash or flap pocket optional. Flap of the outer pocket can also be piped in branch of service color. Fully lined in your choice of lining material. Basic jacket is Machine made, with Hand Done button holes. CSA buttons sewn on.
Up to Size 46: $80.00, Size 48 – 54: $86.00, Size 56 – 60: $94.00, Size 62 -66 $100.00 

OPTIONS:
Gold Soutache sleeve braid
Lieutenant: ADD $6.00 to basic coat.
Captain: ADD $10.00 to basic coat
Major to Colonel: ADD $14.00 to basic coat.
General: ADD $20.00 to basic coat price.

OPTIONS:
ADD $6.00 for collar & cuff facing.
ADD $6.00 for piping on collar and down on front edge.
ADD $6.00 for colored Lapels.
ADD $6.00 for Drooped wing CS eagle gilt buttons.
Muffin style buttons are $1.00 extra each
ADD $12.00 for a Hand Top Stitching sewn coat
ADD $12.00 for piece dyed jean.

COLLAR INSIGNIA:
ADD $6.00 for a pair of Lieutenants hand embroidered Collar Bar.
ADD $8.00 for a pair of Captains Collar Bar.
ADD $4.00 for a pair of pointed Star,
ADD $8.00 for 2 pairs,
ADD $12.00 for 3 pairs







WJ-123 DOUBLE BREASTED OFFICER’S SHELL JACKET: our choice of Jean Wool, with optional collar and front edge piping at extra cost. One to two inner patch pockets, outer slash or flap pocket optional. Flap of the outer pocket can also be piped in branch of service color. Fully lined in your choice of lining material. Basic jacket is Machine made, with Hand Done button holes. CSA buttons sewn on.

Up to Size 46: $100.00, Size 48 – 54: $106.00, Size 56 – 60: $115.00, Size 62 -66 $130.00
OPTIONS:
Gold Soutache sleeve braid
Lieutenant: ADD $6.00 to basic coat.
Captain: ADD $10.00 to basic coat
Major to Colonel: ADD $14.00 to basic coat.
General: ADD $20.00 to basic coat price.

OPTIONS:
ADD $6.00 for collar & cuff facing.
ADD $6.00 for piping on collar and down on front edge.
ADD $6.00 for colored Lapels.
ADD $6.00 for Drooped wing CS eagle gilt buttons.
Muffin style buttons are $1.00 extra each
ADD $12.00 for a Hand Top Stitching sewn coat.
ADD $12.00 for piece dyed jean.  

COLLAR INSIGNIA:
ADD $6.00 for a pair of Lieutenants hand embroidered Collar Bar.
ADD $8.00 for a pair of Captains Collar Bar.
ADD $4.00 for a pair of pointed Star,
ADD $8.00 for 2 pairs,
ADD $12.00 for 3 pairs.
ADD $20.00 for Generals Collar badge.
 





WJ-125 CS FOOT OVERCOAT: Comes fully lined. Fold down type or standing collar ( your choice ), straight sleeves, elbow length cape is also lined. Your choice of cotton material for lining. Machine made, with Hand done Button holes. Buttons sewn on.
Up to Size 46: $170.00, Size 48 – 54: $180.00, Size 56 – 60: $190.00 Size 62-66 Price $200.00

OPTIONS: ADD $36.00 for all visible seams done by hand.


WJ-126 CS MOUNTED PATTERN OVERCOAT: Machine made, comes fully lined in muslin cotton with fold down collar and straight cuffs. Double breasted with 12 buttons front, with cuff length cape which has 12 small size buttons, any block CS or wood dished buttons sewn on. As always button holes done by hand.
UP to size 46: $190.00, Size 48-54: $196.00, Size 56-60: $206.00 Size 62 - 66: $220.00

OPTIONS: ADD $36.00 for all visible seams done by hand.


WJ-128 FOOT PATTERN TROUSERS: Standard side seam pockets, with one watch pocket under the belt line. 

Include waist Size  ??? and Inseam Length desired???
Also available in Richmond Depot pattern with Mule Ear pockets and belt loops on back.   Add rear Buckle is $2.00 extra.
Button fly, with Hand done naval button hole and  Please state Choice of Button type!!!  Bone, Pewter or paper back tin buttons sewn on.
Also available for officer’s with leg stripes in branch of service color. Machine made.

Up to 36 Waist: $68.00, Waist size 38 – 44: $74.00, Size 46 – 50: $80.00, Size 52-56: $88.00, Size 58-60: $100.00.
OPTIONS:
ADD $6.00 for Mule ear pockets with belted back.  ???? 
Add $2.00 for brass buckle included  ?????
ADD $6.00 for Standard leg stripes in branch of service color. ??????
ADD $12.00 for For General Officers Leg Stripes—two stripes of gold lace on the outer seam, one—eighth of an inch apart, and each five—eighths of an inch in width.
ADD $6.00 for hemming  Legs.   State inseam length??????
ADD $12.00 for piece dyed Wool Jean (Indigo/ Rust Dyed) ????


WJ-129 MOUNTED PATTERN TROUSERS: Machine made with side seam pockets & one watch pocket, with extra layer in the seat and leg area, 34 inch inseam, un-hemmed legs.  Choice of Bone, Pewter or Paper Back tin buttons.

UP to 36 waist: $ 76.00, Waist size 38-44: $82.00, Size 46-50: $88.00, Size 52-56: $96.00, Size 58-60: $105.00

OPTIONS:
ADD $6.00 for leg stripes in branch of service color.
ADD $6.00 for hemming.
ADD $12.00 for piece dyed jean wool  Please state Button type waist Size and Inseam desired


WJ-130 MILITARY VEST: Nine button front, three outer pockets, short stand up collar, our vests are slightly padded on front. Jean Wool Colors are Available Brown, Taupe, Indigo Blue,  Butternut Brown, Natural Gray, Salt and Pepper Gray.  The following colors are available for lining and the back: (a) Black polished cotton, (b) Brown cotton, (c) Muslin, (d) Checked/Plaid cotton. Machine sewn, with Hand done Button holes. Buttons sewn on.
Up to size 46: $40.00, Size 48 – 54: $44.00, Size 56 – 60: $50.00 Size 62 - 66  Price 60.00  
ADD $10.00 for piece dyed jean wool.  
ADD $12.00 for all visible seams done by hand. 
ADD $4.00 for drooped wing CS Gilt buttons.


WJ -161 ENLISTED CS FROCK COAT: Machine sewn, with hand done button holes.  Half body lining in White muslin, Brown cotton,  Black cotton or checked cotton.  The basic coat comes without trim color. Block “I” or State brass buttons sewn on.  Sleeves lining on arms-eye and one inside pocket set in the lining are  hand stitched.  Stand up or fold down collar.    Natural Grey, Salt and Pepper , Taupe, Brown Jean wool.  

Up to Size 46: $120.00, Size 48 – 54: $130.00, Size 56 – 60: $140.00,  Size 62 - 66: $150.00.

OPTIONS:

Add $6.00 for collar and cuff facing.

Add $6.00 for colored tape or piping on front edge. 
Add $6.00 for Epilates with or without color.

Add $6.00 for full lining.

Add $ 6.00 for two tail pockets with outer flaps. 
Add $6.00 for color on back flaps
Add top hand stitching for $12.00
Or for $12.00 extra Hand dyed Indigo or Rust Dyed. 

Rank Optional 

$6.00 (per pair) for Corporal and Sergeant rank

$8.00 (per pair) for First Sergeant ,QM Sergeant & Reg. QM Sergeant

$10.00 (per pair) for Sergeant Major & Ordnance Sergeant.

and additional $6.00 to have it sewn on
 




WJ-134 SINGLE BREASTED FROCK COAT WOOL JEAN: Coat comes with Machine Sewn Coat and Hand sewn Button Holes. Sleeves lining on arms-eye and one inside pocket set in the lining are also hand stitched. Fully lined in White cotton muslin, black, brown cotton or checked/plaid cotton, your choice. Standard with State brass buttons sewn on.  Choice Stand up or Fold down collar.
Up to Size 46: $120.00, Size 48 – 54: $130.00, Size 56 – 60: $140.00,  Size 62 - 66: $150.00.

OPTIONS:
Gold Soutache sleeve braid
Lieutenant: ADD $6.00 to basic coat.
Captain: ADD $10.00 to basic coat
Major to Colonel: ADD $14.00 to basic coat.
General: ADD $20.00 to basic coat price.

OPTIONS:
ADD $6.00 for collar & cuff facing.
ADD $6.00 for piping on collar and down on front edge.
ADD $6.00 for colored Lapels.
ADD $6.00 for color on back flaps
ADD $6.00 for Drooped wing CS eagle gilt buttons.
ADD Muffin style buttons are $1.00 extra each
ADD $14.00 for a Hand Top Stitching sewn coat .
ADD $ 6.00 for two tail pockets with outer flaps.
ADD $14.00 for piece dyed jean.

COLLAR INSIGNIA:
ADD $6.00 for a pair of Lieutenants hand embroidered Collar Bar.
ADD $8.00 for a pair of Captains Collar Bar.
ADD $4.00 for a pair of pointed Star,
ADD $8.00 for 2 pairs,
ADD $12.00 for 3 pairs.
ADD $20.00 for Generals Collar badge.


WJ-135 DOUBLE BREASTED FROCK COAT: 

From Lieutenant’s to Generals rank. Fully lined in White cotton muslin, black, brown cotton or  your choice or in period woven checked cotton. One inside breast pocket. Comes Standard with, State, Federal, CSA  buttons are sewn on. Coat comes Machine Sewn, with Hand Done Button Holes. For Lt. Colonel and Colonel 16 Buttons in two rows in sets of 2 on front and for General’s rank 18 in two rows in sets of three. Three small size buttons on each cuff and four large buttons in the back folds.

LIEUTENANT: Up to Size 46: $160.00, Size 48 – 54: $170.00, Size 56 – 60: $180.00, Size 62 -66: $210.00 

Gold Soutache sleeve braid
Lieutenant: ADD $6.00 to basic coat.
Captain: ADD $10.00 to basic coat
Major to Colonel: ADD $14.00 to basic coat.
General: ADD $20.00 to basic coat price.

OPTIONS:
ADD $6.00 for collar & cuff facing.
ADD $6.00 for piping on collar and down on front edge.
ADD $6.00 for colored Lapels.
ADD $6.00 for color on back flaps
ADD $6.00 for Drooped wing CS eagle gilt buttons.
ADD Muffin style buttons are $1.00 extra each
ADD $14.00 for a Hand Top Stitching sewn coat.
ADD $ 6.00 for two tail pockets with outer flaps.
ADD $14.00 for piece dyed jean. 

COLLAR INSIGNIA:
ADD $6.00 for a pair of Lieutenants hand embroidered Collar Bar.
ADD $8.00 for a pair of Captains Collar Bar.
ADD $4.00 for a pair of pointed Star,
ADD $8.00 for 2 pairs,
ADD $12.00 for 3 pairs.
ADD $20.00 for Generals Collar badge.