turabian

To best visualize this style, please download the sample page of citations: MS Word OR PDF.

I realize that footnote citations can be confusing, so this guide is to help with Turabian style (which is a variation of Chicago  Style).

The first sample shows what the source should look like in a Bibliography (note the format of a hanging indentation and double space between citations).

The second sample shows what it looks like as a full footnote. Your first footnote should be a "full footnote." (please note that footnotes are 10 pt font, indented, and have a double space between citations. MS Word 2007 & newer will automatically number your footnotes using the shortcut: alt+f+s (it is also found under the "reference" tab.)

The third sample shows the "short" or abbreviated footnotes. After the first full footnote, you use this style.

Note: Ibid is used whenever on a single page, you have two footnotes in a row that are from the same work.


Sample Turabian Citations

1 Book citations

1.1 BIBLIOGRAPHY (12pt font; hanging indent; space between)

Last, First. Full Title. City: Publisher, Year.

Hock, Ronald. The Social Context of Paul’s Ministry: Tentmaking and Apostleship. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1980.

 

1.2 FOOTNOTE FULL (10pt font; indent first line; space between footnotes)

_____________

1 First Last, Full Title (City: Publisher, Year), page#.

1 Ronald Hock The Social Context of Paul’s Ministry: Tentmaking and Apostleship (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1980), 50–59.

 

1.3 FOOTNOTE SHORT (10pt font; indent first line; space between footnotes)

_____________

1 Last, Title, page#.

1 Hock, Social Context, 51.

 

2 Commentary or Book in Series

2.1 BIBLIOGRAPHY (12pt Font)

Last, First. Full Title. Commentary/Series Name. City: Publisher, Year.

Jewett, Robert. Romans. Hermeneia. Minneapolis: Fortress, 2006.

 

2.2 FOOTNOTE FULL (10pt Font)

_____________

1 First Last, Full Title, Commentary/Series Name (City: Publisher, Year), page#.

1 Robert Jewett, Romans, Hermeneia (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2006), 76–23.

 

2.3 FOOTNOTE SHORT (10pt Font)

_____________

1 Last, Title, page#.

1 Jewett, Romans, 45.


3 Article in Journal

3.1 BIBLIOGRAPHY (12pt Font)

Last, First. “Article Title.” Journal Name Journal# (Year): page#s.

Aus, Roger. “Paul’s Travel Plans to Spain and the ‘Full Number of the Gentiles’ of Rom XI 25.” Novum Testamentum 21 (1979): 251–52.

 

3.2 FOOTNOTE FULL (10pt Font)

_____________

1 Author’s First&LastName, “Article Title,” Journal Name Journal# (Year), page#.

1 Roger Aus, “Paul’s Travel Plans to Spain and the ‘Full Number of the Gentiles’ of Rom XI 25,” Novum Testamentum 21 (1979): 251.

 

3.3 FOOTNOTE SHORT (10pt Font)

_____________

1 Last, “Article Title,” page#.

1 Aus, “Paul’s Travel Plans,” 252.

 

4 Article in Book or Dictionary

4.1 BIBLIOGRAPHY (12pt Font)

Author’sLast, First. “Article Title.” In Full Title. Ed. Editor’sFirst&LastName. Article’sPage#s. City: Publisher, Year. page#s.

Karris, Robert. “Romans 14:1–15:13 and the Occasion of Romans.” In The Romans Debate. Rev. ed., edited by Karl Donfried, 65–84. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1991.

De Jonge, Marinus. “Messiah.” In Anchor Bible Dictionary, edited by D. N. Freedman. 4.777-88. New York: Doubleday, 1992.

4.2 FOOTNOTE FULL (10pt Font)

_____________

1 Author’s First&LastName, “Article Title,” in Full Title, ed. Editor’sFirst&LastName (City: Publisher, Year), page#.

 1 Robert Karris, “Romans 14:1–15:13 and the Occasion of Romans,” in The Romans Debate, rev. ed., ed. Karl Donfried (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1991), 67.

 2 Marinus De Jonge, “Messiah,” in Anchor Bible Dictionary, ed. D. N. Freedman. (New York: Doubleday, 1992), 4.779.

 

4.3 FOOTNOTE SHORT (10pt Font)

_____________

1 AuthorLastName, “Title,” page#.

1 Karris, “Romans 14:1–15:13,” 68.

2 De Jonge, “Messiah,” 780.

 

5 Bible Citations

Names of the books of the Bible cited without chapter or chapter and verse should be spelled out in the main text. Books of the Bible cited with chapter or chapter and verse should be abbreviated (never spelled out!), unless they come at the beginning of the sentence. All occurrences of biblical books in parentheses and footnotes should be abbreviated. Authors citing more than one translation of the Bible must indicate which translation is used in a particular citation (When this citation is in parentheses, a comma is not needed to separate the citation and the translation abbreviation).

Right: (1) The passage in 1 Cor 5 is often considered crucial. (2) The passage, 1 Cor 5:6, is often considered crucial. (3) First Corinthians 5:6 is a crucial text. (4) “Do you not know that a little yeast leavens the whole batch of dough?" (1 Cor 5:6 NRSV).

Wrong: (1) In 1 Corinthians 5:6, Paul writes a crucial text. (2) In First Corinthians chapter five verse six, Paul writes a crucial text. (3) 1 Cor 5:6 is a crucial text. (4) 1 Corinthians 5:6 is a crucial text.


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