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Wholesale Window Shutters


wholesale window shutters
    window shutters
  • A window shutter is a solid and stable window covering usually consisting of a frame of vertical stiles and horizontal rails (top, center and bottom).
    wholesale
  • at a wholesale price; "I can sell it to you wholesale"
  • sweeping: ignoring distinctions; "sweeping generalizations"; "wholesale destruction"
  • Sell (goods) in large quantities at low prices to be retailed by others
  • the selling of goods to merchants; usually in large quantities for resale to consumers
wholesale window shutters - Nikon Coolpix
Nikon Coolpix S710 14.5MP Digital Camera with 3.6x Wide Angle Optical Vibration Reduction (VR) Zoom (Graphite Black)
Nikon Coolpix S710 14.5MP Digital Camera with 3.6x Wide Angle Optical Vibration Reduction (VR) Zoom (Graphite Black)
Get a camera that's perfect for any type of photographer. The Nikon Coolpix S710 has many features for people who want great pictures without fussing with settings, but it also has complete manual control for those who like to get creative. Program, Aperture, Shutter, and Manual Exposure Modes Scene Auto Selector automatically recognizes the scene in your picture and adjusts the camera setting Blink warning will let you know when your subject's eyes are closed so you can retake your picture Smile Shutter - The camera can detect up to three faces with the subject's smile, determine which is closest to the center of the frame, ultimately firing the shutter Face Priority AF - face-finding technology that quickly finds and focuses on up to 12 faces in a group portrait Auto adjusts up to ISO 3200. Plus, using pixel addition, ISO sensitivity can be set to an amazing ISO 6400 and ISO 12800 (image sizes of 3mb or lower are required) In-Camera Red-Eye Fix D-Lighting - rescue those photos that are too dark for printing by enhancing the underexposed areas of the picture while not touching the properly exposed areas 16 Scene Modes High Quality TV Movies with Sound with a press of a button - duration is limited only by the available space on your SD/SDHC card Approx. 42MB Internal Memory Formats - JPEG, AVI, WAV Rechargeable Lithium-ion Battery Dimensions (H x W x D) - 2.3 x 3.6 x 1 in. (57.5 x 93 x 24 mm) Weight - 5.5 oz. (155g)

85% (19)
Cary Building
Cary Building
Tribeca, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States of America The Cary Building, built in 1856-57, is one of New York's most important 19th-century commercial structures. Designed by one of New York's most prominent firms specializing in commercial architecture, with cast-iron fronts fabricated by the city's most important foundry, it is a significant early product of the period during the middle of the century when New York's premier position in the commercial life of the nation was established. The pioneering Cary Building exemplifies three developments which set major patterns for the spectacular commercial growth of post-Civil War New York: 1) the commercial redevelopment of the area north and west of City Hall; 2) the introduction of the Italianate "palazzo" type; and 3) the development of the cast-iron facade. The building's architects, Gamaliel King and John Kellum, were important for their role in shaping the new commercial city; and the foundry which cast the building's iron fronts, Daniel D. Badger's Architectural Iron Works, was the first major foundry in the business and eventually the most prolific and influential. As an early product of key trends in the city's commercial development, as one of the earliest surviving cast-iron buildings, and as the product of a major architect and foundry, the Cary Building is of seminal importance to the development of 19th-century commercial New York . The Commercial Transformation of Lower Manhattan and the Cary Building The unparalleled growth of New York City in the 19th century, which led to its emergence as the largest and richest city in the country, was primarily the result of commerce. Following the end of the War of 1812, which reopened the Atlantic trade routes, and the .opening in 1825 of the Erie Canal, which' connected New York to the interior, the city grew into the country's major port and trading center. Commercial pressure almost immediately began to push the city beyond the traditional limits of lower Manhattan, and a pattern of rapid development and redevelopment emerged. The city's commercial districts moved northward into former residential areas, replacing older houses with first-class shops. New well-to-do residential districts developed still further north on the city's outskirts. Older prime commercial areas to the south became warehouse and wholesale districts.-'- Following the completion in 18A6 of the A.T. Stewart store, the first department store in the country,2 on Broadway between Reade and Chambers Streets, the residential district along Broadway north of City Hall rapidly changed into the city's leading commercial district. Over the next forty years, the Broadway area between City Hall Park and Madison Square became the commercial heart of the metropolis. Stewart's store also set architectural precedents for that development: his architect, John Snook, designed an enormous stone "palazzo," with cast-iron and glass storefronts, in the newly fashionable Italianate style. This was the first of the "commercial palaces" built for New York's "merchant princes," and it set the style and the type for the next several decades. The change in the Broadway area was noticed as early as 1852: The entire length of Broadway seems to have been measured for a new suit of marble and freestone—six and seven story buildings going up on its whole length, of most magnificent elegance in style... Indeed public and private buildings are going up in all directions.. .with Aladin-like splendor and celerity,^ By the time of the Civil Var, the district's character had irreversibly changed according to the writer of a retrospective editorial in Harper's Magazine in 1862: Those who remember the Broadway of twenty years ago can hardly walk the streets now without incessant wonder and surprise. For although the transformation is gradually wrought, it is always going on before the eye. Twenty years ago it was a street of three-story red brick houses. Now it is a highway of stone, and iron, and marble buildings.... Some of the new stores in Broadway are almost as imposing as some of the palaces in Italian cities.' The Cary Building on a site running through the block from Chambers to Reade Streets between Church Street and West Broadway, was built for the firm of Cary, Howard & Sanger, drygoods merchants.^ The major partner in the firm was William H. Cary (1787-1861), a Bostonian who came to New York in the 1820s and eventually became quite wealthy, owning real estate in Brooklyn and New York, and stock in banks, insurance companies, and the Brooklyn Railroad Company of which he was president. Cary, Howard & Sanger, established during the economic depression of 1837, prospered so that by 1854 it was considered the "richest house" on the trade. The store was located at 243 Pearl Street, in the older commercial district; Cary, following the trend north and west, purchased the site
Ralph and Anne E. Van Wyck Mead House
Ralph and Anne E. Van Wyck Mead House
110 Second Avenue, Lower East Side, Manhattan The grand three-story (plus attic and basement) Greek Revival style rowhouse at No. 110 Second Avenue, in today’s East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, is the only survivor of a row of four houses that functioned as an enclave for the extended family of the very wealthy wholesale grocery and commission merchant Ralph Mead (1789-1866). Constructed c. 1837-38 by the Mead family, No. 110 was the home in 1839-44 of merchant/ship broker David H. Robertson. After Robertson declared bankruptcy, this property was foreclosed and auctioned in 1844, and transferred to Ralph Mead. The proprietor of Ralph Mead & Co. (established 1815), Mead and his second wife, nee Ann Eliza Van Wyck, resided here from 1845 until 1857. The house was leased after 1858 and remained in Mead family ownership until 1870. It was sold to railroad agent George H. Ellery and his wife, Cornelia, who resided here c. 1872- 74. It was purchased in 1874 by the Women’s Prison Association, which had been established in 1845 as the Female Department of the Prison Association of New York by Isaac Tatem Hopper and his daughter, Abigail Hopper Gibbons, noted Quaker abolitionists and leading advocates of prison reform, and chartered in 1854 under the new name. The Isaac T. Hopper Home, opened here in 1874, is considered the world’s oldest halfway house for girls and women released from prison. The Home’s original mission was to rehabilitate these women by providing short-term shelter, religious counseling, domestic training in sewing and laundry work, and job placement. A rare extant house of the period when this section of Second Avenue was one of the most elite addresses in Manhattan in the early 19th century, it is also a fine example of a grand Greek Revival style rowhouse. The house is characterized by its machine-pressed red brickwork laid in stretcher bond; high stoop and areaway with wrought-iron fence; entrance with Italianate style paneled double doors and transom; long parlor-level windows and cast-iron balcony; and denticulated cornice; and is made particularly distinctive by its brownstone portico with Ionic fluted columns supporting an entablature. The Isaac T. Hopper Home, which has continuously served the mission of the Women’s Prison Association here since 1874, is a rare surviving 19th-century institutional presence in this ever-changing neighborhood. 9 Description The Mead House (Isaac T. Hopper Home) at No. 110 Second Avenue is a three-story (plus attic and basement) Greek Revival style rowhouse with a three-bay, 26-foot-wide facade. It is clad in machine-pressed red brick laid in stretcher bond above a brownstone base. The base has two windows with six-over-six double-hung (non-historic) wood sash and non-historic iron grilles. The areaway, paved in concrete with a metal plate and grate, as well as planting areas, has a wroughtiron fence and gates (which replaced the original cast-iron ones, c. 1893-1966), set partially on stone 10 edging. The high brownstone stoop (which once had urns on the pedestals) has non-historic metal railings and a recessed basement entrance. The main entrance has a brownstone portico with pilasters and Ionic fluted columns (parts of the Ionic capitals are missing) supporting an entablature; and Italianate style paneled double wooden doors and a transom set within a rope molded enframement, with paneled reveals. A non-historic light fixture has been placed over the doorway. The parlor level has long windows (with nine-over-nine double-hung (non-historic) wood sash) and an original bracketed cast-iron balcony. A security camera and a light fixture have been placed on the parlor-level wall. Windows on the second and third stories have six-over-six double-hung (nonhistoric) wood sash. The windows historically had shutters. The original stone lintels (with a simple top molding) and simple stone sills were replaced by projecting molded metal lintels and corbeled metal sills (post-1890s). The denticulated cornice was altered (c. 1966-70) by the enlargement of the attic windows (with three-over-three double-hung sash), partial re-cladding in wood, and removal of a denticulated molding. A metal railing was placed at the front of the roof, and a metal leader pipe is located on the northern edge of the facade. - From the 2009 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report

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