RED BRICK HOUSE WITH BLACK SHUTTERS - RED BRICK HOUSE

Red brick house with black shutters - Window roller shutters.

Red Brick House With Black Shutters


red brick house with black shutters
    brick house
  • Brick House (or Brick House Cigars) is a brand of cigars handmade in Nicaragua by the J.C. Newman Cigar Company.
  • Brick House, also known as Garland House or King David's Palace, is a historic home located at Clifford, Amherst County, Virginia. It is a two-story Federal Style, Flemish bond brick house with a projecting pavilion.
  • The Brick House in Cazenovia, New York was built in 1865. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.
    shutters
  • Close (a business)
  • (shutter) a mechanical device on a camera that opens and closes to control the time of a photographic exposure
  • (shutter) close with shutters; "We shuttered the window to keep the house cool"
  • (shutter) a hinged blind for a window
  • Close the shutters of (a window or building)
    black
  • the quality or state of the achromatic color of least lightness (bearing the least resemblance to white)
  • blacken: make or become black; "The smoke blackened the ceiling"; "The ceiling blackened"
  • Make black, esp. by the application of black polish
  • Make (one's face, hands, and other visible parts of one's body) black with polish or makeup, so as not to be seen at night or, esp. formerly, to play the role of a black person in a musical show, play, or movie
  • being of the achromatic color of maximum darkness; having little or no hue owing to absorption of almost all incident light; "black leather jackets"; "as black as coal"; "rich black soil"
    red
  • a tributary of the Mississippi River that flows eastward from Texas along the southern boundary of Oklahoma and through Louisiana
  • red color or pigment; the chromatic color resembling the hue of blood
  • crimson: characterized by violence or bloodshed; "writes of crimson deeds and barbaric days"- Andrea Parke; "fann'd by Conquest's crimson wing"- Thomas Gray; "convulsed with red rage"- Hudson Strode
  • (of a person's eyes) Bloodshot or having pink rims, esp. with tiredness or crying
  • Of a color at the end of the spectrum next to orange and opposite violet, as of blood, fire, or rubies
  • (of a person or their face or complexion) Flushed or rosy, esp. with embarrassment, anger, or a healthy glow
red brick house with black shutters - Wallmonkeys Peel
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Decals - Brick House - 24"H x 16"W Removable Graphic
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Decals - Brick House - 24"H x 16"W Removable Graphic
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Herman A. and Malvina Schleicher House
Herman A. and Malvina Schleicher House
College Point, Queens, New York City, New York, United States The Herman A. and Malvina Schleicher House is located in College Point, in north central Queens. It stands on an unusual circular site that was created c. 1906 when the original 14-acre estate was subdivided into building lots and became part of the surrounding street grid. Morris A. Gescheidt, a German-born painter and architect, was responsible for the building’s neo-classical design. Two-and-a-half stories tall, this large red brick house has four visible facades that display elements associated with the Italianate and Second Empire styles, including a mansard roof, segmental arch windows, and quoins. Active in New York City from the late 1840s to the 1860s, Gescheidt also built a factory structure for College Point’s leading citizen, the industrialist Conrad Poppenhusen, in 1854. These developments coincided with the introduction of regular ferry service, resulting in the construction of many residences by German immigrants, particularly in the north section of the village where owners enjoyed views of the East River and Long Island Sound. Two contemporary newspapers commented on Gescheidt’s handsome design; while one writer listed it as among several “elegant residences . . . under contract” in the area, the Flushing Journal called it “another gem of a residence.” The Schleicher House was originally situated at the west end of a walled compound that incorporated out buildings and landscaped carriage paths. Though relatively little is known about the Schleicher family, census records indicate that Herman had Prussian parents and was a successful merchant, involved in the sale of dry goods, stationary, and coal. He shared the house with his wife Malvina, four children, and three servants. Following his death in 1866, the building was acquired by Kenneth G. White, who owned considerable property in the area and is often identified as an attorney and law clerk. In 1890, the house was sold to developer William K. Aston who leased it to John Jockers, a former Schleicher employee. For about a decade, Jockers operated the structure as the 11-room Grand View Hotel. Divided into apartments in 1923, there are currently seven units in the building. Despite changes, the 1857 Schleicher House has many notable characteristics; not only is it one of the oldest houses in College Point but it is one of the earliest surviving structures in New York City to feature a mansard roof. College Point, Queens The Schleicher House was constructed in 1857, during the decade when College Point was transformed from mostly meadows and farmland to a compact village of factories and homes. Located on a peninsula in north central Queens, College Point extends into the East River and adjoins Flushing Bay. It was named for St. Paul’s College, which opened in 1839. Located on the site of present-day MacNeil Park, the seminary lasted for less than a decade, closing in 1847. At the time, the area to the south was known as Strattonport and Flammersburg. These neighborhoods were named for businessman Eliphalet Stratton (1745-1831) who purchased 320 acres from descendents of the English merchant and slave owner William Lawrence (1622-1680) in 1789,3 and real estate developer John A. Flammer, who acquired 141 acres from the Stratton estate in 1851 and subdivided the property into 80 building lots. These villages then merged and were incorporated as College Point in 1867 or 1870. Regular ferry service between Manhattan and the village started in the 1850s and plans were soon developed to construct a paved causeway, linking the peninsula to Flushing. These transit improvements attracted a growing number of residents, from several hundred in 1853 to 2,200 in 1860. More than half were foreign born, including nearly a thousand from Germany. The rest were mainly Irish. Because the majority of early residents were originally German, College Point was sometimes referred to as the “Little Heidelberg.” Conrad Poppenhusen, the town’s best-known citizen, was born in Hamburg, Germany, in 1813. He immigrated to the United States in 1843, forming a partnership with H. C. Meyer in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, to produce consumer products from whale bones. When demand declined, he sought new opportunities, acquiring a license from the American inventor Charles Goodyear, who held various patents for the vulcanization of rubber. In July 1853, he toured College Point to inspect “eligible locations” for his new company and in September 1854 laid the cornerstone for the “India Rubber Comb Company,” with at least six hundred people in attendance. Among various attendees were several men who would later be associated with the Schleicher residence: M. Gescheidt, the architect; A. Schleicher, either his father, Arthur, or the owner himself; and of course, the owner of the factory, Poppenhusen – Schleicher’s neighbor and co-executor of his will. Herman A. Schleicher (c. 1827-1866) Relatively little is
Herman A. and Malvina Schleicher House
Herman A. and Malvina Schleicher House
College Point, Queens The Herman A. and Malvina Schleicher House is located in College Point, in north central Queens. It stands on an unusual circular site that was created c. 1906 when the original 14-acre estate was subdivided into building lots and became part of the surrounding street grid. Morris A. Gescheidt, a German-born painter and architect, was responsible for the building’s neo-classical design. Two-and-a-half stories tall, this large red brick house has four visible facades that display elements associated with the Italianate and Second Empire styles, including a mansard roof, segmental arch windows, and quoins. Active in New York City from the late 1840s to the 1860s, Gescheidt also built a factory structure for College Point’s leading citizen, the industrialist Conrad Poppenhusen, in 1854. These developments coincided with the introduction of regular ferry service, resulting in the construction of many residences by German immigrants, particularly in the north section of the village where owners enjoyed views of the East River and Long Island Sound. Two contemporary newspapers commented on Gescheidt’s handsome design; while one writer listed it as among several “elegant residences . . . under contract” in the area, the Flushing Journal called it “another gem of a residence.” The Schleicher House was originally situated at the west end of a walled compound that incorporated out buildings and landscaped carriage paths. Though relatively little is known about the Schleicher family, census records indicate that Herman had Prussian parents and was a successful merchant, involved in the sale of dry goods, stationary, and coal. He shared the house with his wife Malvina, four children, and three servants. Following his death in 1866, the building was acquired by Kenneth G. White, who owned considerable property in the area and is often identified as an attorney and law clerk. In 1890, the house was sold to developer William K. Aston who leased it to John Jockers, a former Schleicher employee. For about a decade, Jockers operated the structure as the 11-room Grand View Hotel. Divided into apartments in 1923, there are currently seven units in the building. Despite changes, the 1857 Schleicher House has many notable characteristics; not only is it one of the oldest houses in College Point but it is one of the earliest surviving structures in New York City to feature a mansard roof. College Point, Queens The Schleicher House was constructed in 1857, during the decade when College Point was transformed from mostly meadows and farmland to a compact village of factories and homes. Located on a peninsula in north central Queens, College Point extends into the East River and adjoins Flushing Bay. It was named for St. Paul’s College, which opened in 1839. Located on the site of present-day MacNeil Park, the seminary lasted for less than a decade, closing in 1847. At the time, the area to the south was known as Strattonport and Flammersburg. These neighborhoods were named for businessman Eliphalet Stratton (1745-1831) who purchased 320 acres from descendents of the English merchant and slave owner William Lawrence (1622-1680) in 1789,3 and real estate developer John A. Flammer, who acquired 141 acres from the Stratton estate in 1851 and subdivided the property into 80 building lots. These villages then merged and were incorporated as College Point in 1867 or 1870. Regular ferry service between Manhattan and the village started in the 1850s and plans were soon developed to construct a paved causeway, linking the peninsula to Flushing. These transit improvements attracted a growing number of residents, from several hundred in 1853 to 2,200 in 1860. More than half were foreign born, including nearly a thousand from Germany. The rest were mainly Irish. Because the majority of early residents were originally German, College Point was sometimes referred to as the “Little Heidelberg.” Conrad Poppenhusen, the town’s best-known citizen, was born in Hamburg, Germany, in 1813. He immigrated to the United States in 1843, forming a partnership with H. C. Meyer in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, to produce consumer products from whale bones. When demand declined, he sought new opportunities, acquiring a license from the American inventor Charles Goodyear, who held various patents for the vulcanization of rubber. In July 1853, he toured College Point to inspect “eligible locations” for his new company and in September 1854 laid the cornerstone for the “India Rubber Comb Company,” with at least six hundred people in attendance. Among various attendees were several men who would later be associated with the Schleicher residence: M. Gescheidt, the architect; A. Schleicher, either his father, Arthur, or the owner himself; and of course, the owner of the factory, Poppenhusen – Schleicher’s neighbor and co-executor of his will. Herman A. Schleicher (c. 1827-1866) Relatively little is known about Herman A(lvin) Schleicher.

red brick house with black shutters
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