SHUTTER CLASSIC. CLASSIC

Shutter classic. Rv canopy lights. Drapery hardware parts

Shutter Classic


shutter classic
    shutter
  • Close the shutters of (a window or building)
  • a mechanical device on a camera that opens and closes to control the time of a photographic exposure
  • Close (a business)
  • close with shutters; "We shuttered the window to keep the house cool"
  • a hinged blind for a window
    classic
  • Remarkably and instructively typical
  • Judged over a period of time to be of the highest quality and outstanding of its kind
  • (of a garment or design) Of a simple elegant style not greatly subject to changes in fashion
  • an artist who has created classic works
  • authoritative: of recognized authority or excellence; "the definitive work on Greece"; "classical methods of navigation"
  • a creation of the highest excellence
shutter classic - The House
The House With The Green Shutters (Canongate Classics S.)
The House With The Green Shutters (Canongate Classics S.)
Introduced by Cairns Craig.The most famous Scottish novel of the early twentieth century, The House with the Green Shutters has remained a landmark on the literary scene ever since it was first published in 1901.Determined to overthrow the sentimental ‘kailyard’ stereotypes of the day, George Douglas Brown exposed the bitter pettiness of commercial greed and small-town Scottish life as he himself had come to know it. More than this, however, his novel lays bare the seductive and crippling presence of patriarchal authority in Scottish culture at large, symbolised by the terrible struggle between old John Gourlay and his weak but imaginative son.Illuminated by lightning flashes of descriptive brilliance, Brown’s prose evokes melodrama, Greek tragedy and postmodern alienation in a unique and unforgettably powerful reading experience.‘Brown’s masterpiece was practically the first Scottish novel since Galt which dealt with nineteenth-century Scottish life as it really was; to do this, and to get away from the sentimentalism of the Kailyard, it had to be sharply, almost brutally realistic.’ Kurt Wittig, The Scottish Tradition in Literature

Introduced by Cairns Craig.The most famous Scottish novel of the early twentieth century, The House with the Green Shutters has remained a landmark on the literary scene ever since it was first published in 1901.Determined to overthrow the sentimental ‘kailyard’ stereotypes of the day, George Douglas Brown exposed the bitter pettiness of commercial greed and small-town Scottish life as he himself had come to know it. More than this, however, his novel lays bare the seductive and crippling presence of patriarchal authority in Scottish culture at large, symbolised by the terrible struggle between old John Gourlay and his weak but imaginative son.Illuminated by lightning flashes of descriptive brilliance, Brown’s prose evokes melodrama, Greek tragedy and postmodern alienation in a unique and unforgettably powerful reading experience.‘Brown’s masterpiece was practically the first Scottish novel since Galt which dealt with nineteenth-century Scottish life as it really was; to do this, and to get away from the sentimentalism of the Kailyard, it had to be sharply, almost brutally realistic.’ Kurt Wittig, The Scottish Tradition in Literature

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Shoot a Classic
Shoot a Classic
A Classic Car is a pretty easy thing to spot, particularly for a Boomer. But for me, the story runs a lot deeper. One of the reasons a classic like this catches my eye and winds up in my photostream goes back to a warm summer day in 1961. My mom, then a young, strikingly beautiful woman, visionary artist, and extraordinary human being, gave me my first camera and told me to shoot pictures of things that I thought were "classic". It's the first memory I have of the term "classic". So there I was, 9 years old, sitting on the curb, and the cars of the late '50's like the Chevy above would come by, and I would click the shutter on my light green Brownie Box Camera. My artist mom motivated me at a young age to always have an eye for the extraordinary and to always breathe every breath like it was the last. (To see her photo, go to my "Family" set and you will see her black & white photo.) And so this leads into perhaps the most classic story about my life. It was a moment that changed me forever and made me what I am today. It fits this photograph, so indulge me. One night in the summer of 1961, my mom was away at a P.T.A. meeting and my dad had the assignment of getting me to bed. We didn't have air conditioning back then, and it was a hot, sticky night, and I couldn't sleep. My dad, though a wonderful loving dad, didn't have a solution any deeper than "keep laying in bed until you fall asleep". Well, folks, that doesn't cut it on a hot, sticky Indiana night for a 9 year old. By the time my mom got home, it was late, I was wide awake, and very frustrated. She knelt by my bed and asked me how things were. When I told her, she said "wait here a minute". I was confounded. In a few minutes she had slipped out of a beautiful red dress I still remember and into a pair of cutoff jean shorts and a white tee shirt that had "Notre Dame" in black letters across the front. She said, "Jimmy, slip on your shorts and come with me". I couldn't fathom what she meant, because it was nearly 11pm and I had never been out that late at night. That night, she took me outside and we walked a block up to U.S. Highway 50 and sat down on a bench and watched the late night traffic go by on the highway. I sat in wide-eyed amazement and looked at the cars at night and at the bright stars in the summer sky. It was incomprehensible. I asked her "how long can we stay"? And she said "until we want to leave". I still remember the wonderful sense of freedom and amazement that gave me. We sat there on that bench for a long time and I drank in the night life I had never seen that summer night. She never suggested we head back home, rather, she let me enjoy the night until I was so tired I asked to go back. The following November, my mother was shot to death by an intruder in our home, and this moment in time was further emblazoned into my heart and soul. Whenever I see a "classic moment", I remember that night. I remembered it again this week when I spotted this car. And so, now you know.
Classic Stingray
Classic Stingray
A Corvette StingrayClassic Car ,appeared at Indonesia International Motor Show 2011 Exposure Time = 1/30" F Number = F5.6 Exposure Program = Manual ISO Speed Ratings = 500 Shutter Speed Value = 4.91 TV Aperture Value = 4.97 AV Exposure Bias Value = ±0EV Max Aperture Value = F1.74 Metering Mode = Pattern Light Source = Cloudy weather Flash = Off Focal Length = 35mm

shutter classic
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