HOW TO USE DRAPERY HOOKS - HOW TO USE

How to use drapery hooks - Markilux awning - Make relaxed roman shades

How To Use Drapery Hooks


how to use drapery hooks
    drapery hooks
  • (Drapery hook) The drapery hook is a hook designed for handing drapery. The distinctive shape shown in the figure, with a sharp end and a blunt end, was patented by James William McGhee (1882–1968) in the 1920s. Numerous other drapery hooks were patented before and after this common design.
  • Pinning hooks used to hang draperies on carriers or rings.
    how to
  • A how-to or a how to is an informal, often short, description of how to accomplish some specific task. A how-to is usually meant to help non-experts, may leave out details that are only important to experts, and may also be greatly simplified from an overall discussion of the topic.
  • (How To’s) Multi-Speed Animations
  • Providing detailed and practical advice
  • Practical advice on a particular subject; that gives advice or instruction on a particular topic
how to use drapery hooks - Wrights Drapery
Wrights Drapery Hooks Wall Pleater 3 7/8 (3 Pack)
Wrights Drapery Hooks Wall Pleater 3 7/8 (3 Pack)
Wrights Drapery Hooks are a must have when you are making drapes and valances. Different kinds are needed, depending on the style of drapes. Each sturdy metal hook is designed to add stability and security when hanging your drapes. Wall Pleater 3 7/8- These are used only with 3-7/8 regular pleater tape/multi-pleater tape and form 3-prong pleats. A wall hook is used for a wall-mounted rod, where the fabric of the drapery must cover the rod, and the rod is hung just above the window. Includes10 wall pleater hooks and 4 end pins.

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Statue of Liberty
Statue of Liberty
From the Valentino Pier, Red Hook, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States I believe this enterprise will take on very great proportions. If things turn out as I hope they will this work of sculpture will become of great moral importance. The sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi wrote these prophetic words in 1871, nearly fifteen years before his grand creation, the Statue of Liberty, was completed. The statue was intended to symbolize man's enduring belief in liberty, and to commemorate the long-standing friendship between the United States and France. It is, moreover, a monument to the idealism, perseverance, generosity, and hard work of people both here and in France who, like Bartholdi, had faith In the/'great moral importance" of the statue. With the passage of time the significance of the Statue of Liberty has deepened and expanded, until she has become the primary symbol of American liberty, independence and freedom. Standing in New York harbor, she has greeted millions of immigrants arriving in America, and thus has come to symbolize the hope for a better life in a new homeland, free from tyranny and oppression. Although Liberty has become quintessentially American, the idea for the statue originated in France. It was first suggested by Edouard-Rene Lefebvre de Laboulaye (1811-1683). Laboulaye was an historian, author, and the foremost French authority on American constitutional history. A great admirer of America, he had published a three-volume history of the United States, a satirical story "Paris in America", and numerous articles espousing the Union cause during the Civil War, He was the principal figure of a group of French intellectuals who, during the Second Empire, advocated Republican rule for France, They viewed American government as exemplary and took pride in the role played by Frenchmen such as Lafayette in the formation of the American republic. Thus, the initial idea from which the Statue of Liberty resulted was in keeping with Laboulaye's sentiments and political philosophy. At a dinner given by him in the summer of 1865 at his estate at Glatigny, near Versailles, Bartholdi, who was one of the quests, listened to a discussion concerning gratitude between nations. Labouiaye, emphasizing the friendship between France and America, commented, "If a monument to independence were to be built in America, I should think it very natural if it were built by united effort, if It were a common work of both nations,," Historical events at the time, especially in France but also in the United States, made the construction of such a monument an action of potential political significance. In America, the Civil War had just ended with the republic intact, but President Lincoln had been assassinated. The common people of France were profoundly disturbed by this tragic event, so much so that a public subscription was initiated to fund a gift to Mrs. Lincoln which would express the sympathies of the French people. A gold medal was made and inscribed with the words "Dedicated by the French Democracy to Lincoln". This tribute was opposed by the French monarchy then in power; the medal had to be struck in Switzerland and smuggled to the American embassy in France, Republicans such as Laboulaye, who opposed the monarchy of Napoleon III, no doubt deeply resented this act of suppression, directed against a memorial to a leader of a democracy. Laboulaye must have recognized that the construction of a great monument to Liberty would constitute a statement of strong political belief, one which would strengthen the image of republicanism in France. Thus, the construction of the Statue of Liberty had distinct propagandists overtones. By 1877, after much political turmoil, the ends sought by Laboulaye and other Republicans were achieved- monarchy was overturned and the Third Republic founded. By 1871 positive steps toward the creation of the statue were taken, Bartholdi, who never lost interest in the project, had however, been occupied in the political difficulties of France, He fought in the Franco-Prussian War and witnessed the heartbreak!ng loss of his native Alsace to the enemy. In 1871, the war at an end, he determined on the advice of Laboulaye to visit the United States. He sailed in June on the Pereire. armed with instructions and letters of introduction, and well-prepared to study America's reactions to the proposed monument. He travelled extensiveIy-**as far west as San Francisco-enjoying all that he encountered. He met with many prominent men, including President U, S, Grant, Senator Charles Sumner, and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Everywhere he discussed the statue he received enthusiastic response. Upon his return to France in the fall he was able to report positively on American interest; he had, in addition, selected the site for the monument —Bedloe's Island in New York harbor, at the threshold of the New World. The precise th
Restoration hardware drape panels
Restoration hardware drape panels
garnet background, raised chenille tan/gold motif, white cotton lined, pole pocket with ability to use hooks (also possible to customize with goblet style stitches) 50 panels by 84 length

how to use drapery hooks
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