WINDOW TREATMENTS WITH VERTICAL BLINDS. WINDOW TREATMENTS WITH

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Window Treatments With Vertical Blinds


window treatments with vertical blinds
    window treatments
  • Curtains, blinds, shutters, etc.
  • Shades or blinds put on a window.
  • Interior decoration for a window or window frame
  • Curtains, blinds, valences, shades or anything attached to the windows.
    vertical blinds
  • A window blind is a type of window covering which is made with slats of fabric, wood, plastic or metal that adjust by rotating from an open position to a closed position by allowing slats to overlap. A roller blind does not have slats but comprises a single piece of material.
  • UpWindow treatment featuring vertical vanes that can be swiveled open and closed or opened in either a split or one-way stack.
  • Strips of fabric [louvres] suspended vertically from a headrail. Immensely practical blind which comes into it's own on larger sizes

Bennet-Farrell-Feldman House
Bennet-Farrell-Feldman House
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn The Bennet-Farrel -Feldmann House is a rare survivor from the era when fashionable villas lined Shore Road along the bluffs of Bay Ridge overlooking the Narrows and Upper and Lower Bays. Built for Joseph S. Bennet around 1847, it was one of three houses erected by members of the Bennet family on Shore Road in the 1840s. Moved to its present location around 1913, it remains within the grounds of Bennet's original estate. The property was originally part of the mid-eighteenth -century farm owned by Bennet's grandparents. The grandest mid-nineteenth-century house still standing in Southern Brooklyn, the Bennet-Farrell-Feldmann House is a rare and exceptionally intact Greek Revival style villa in New York City. A five-bay-wide, two-and-one-half-story frame building, the house is sheathed in its original clapboards and features characteristic Greek Revival details such as columned front and rear porches, two-story comer pilasters, denticulated cornices, molded window surrounds, and a low attic story articulated as a crowning entablature. The house has passed through the hands of several owners. The colorful Farrell family, which occupied the house from 1890 to 1912, included James P. Farrell, a successful businessman and Tammany Hall politician, his daughter, Georgina, an early woman graduate of Pratt Institute, and son, Jack, a manager-promoter for Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Today the Bennet-Farrell-Feldmann House is a tangible reminder of the borough's early history and the evolution of the Fort Hamilton-Bay Ridge neighborhood. The Bennets of New Utrecht In 1761 John Bennet, a descendant of Willem Adriaense Bennet, the first European settler of the Gowanus area of Brooklyn, married Williamtie Barkeloo, the daughter of Harmanus Barkeloo, one of the principal landowners in New Utrecht. At the time of the marriage, Barkeloo conveyed to Bennet a tract of land, extending between present-day Third Avenue and the harbor from about 94th Street to 97th Street, where he built a wood gambrel-roofed farmhouse (demolished 1955). Eventually, the northern half of the farm passed to John Bennet's daughter-in-law Mary Seguine Bennet. Around 1840, she had the property mapped for division among her three sons and her son-in-law James S. Seguine. In the early 1840s, two sons, John H. Bennet and James S. Bennet, built villas along Shore Road. The third son, Joseph S. Bennet, a coal merchant living in Manhattan, and James S. Seguine, a resident of Norfolk, Virginia, held their ten acres of land in common until 1846. That year, Mary Bennet's twin brother, Joseph Seguine,5 a wealthy Staten Island businessman who operated the Blazing Star Ferry in Rossville, died leaving considerable property to his nephew, Joseph S. Bennet. With this inheritance, Joseph S. Bennet was able to purchase James S. Seguine's interest in the New Utrecht property and to build this handsome villa on the Shore Road, not far from his grandfather's old house. The Developrrent of the Fort Hamilton Neighborhood and the Joseph Bennet House In the late 1840's, when Joseph Bennet built his new house, the transformation of the sparsely settled farming community in the township of New Utrecht to the prosperous village and fashionable resort of Fort Hamilton was well underway. A major impetus for the development of the village was the construction of a permanent casement fortress, named Fort Hamilton in honor of Alexander Hamilton, on the headlands overlooking the Narrows, between 1825 and 1831. While the fort was under construction, a number of laborers, many of whom were recent Irish immigrants, began building wooden houses to the west and north of the fort. Within a few years, a large village had developed with stores, houses, churches, and a school. Regular stage service to the town centers of New Utrecht and Gowanus, and to downtown Brooklyn, was established. Fort Hamilton was linked to Staten Island by ferry service from a wharf at the foot of Third Avenue; by the mid-nineteenth century there was also daily steamboat service to Murray Street in Manhattan. The presence of a fort and ferry in the neighborhood created a need for temporary accommodations. By the 1840s, a number of villagers had converted their homes to boarding houses. Soon, there was also a grand hotel, the Hamilton House, on Shore Road near the ferry dock, which catered to summer visitors attracted by the spectacular harbor views, ocean breezes, and beaches. By mid-century, Fort Hamilton was a popular destination for excursions fromNew York and the Hamilton House was "crowded with guests from all parts of the world." In the 1850s, the neighboring village of Yellow Hook, centered around the intersection of Third Avenue and Bay Ridge Avenue and served by a dock at the foot of Bay Ridge Avenue, also expanded rapidly. This development was encouraged by the straightening and widening of Third Avenue in 1848 and by the establishment of the Ovington
Bennet-Farrell-Feldman House
Bennet-Farrell-Feldman House
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn The Bennet-Farrel -Feldmann House is a rare survivor from the era when fashionable villas lined Shore Road along the bluffs of Bay Ridge overlooking the Narrows and Upper and Lower Bays. Built for Joseph S. Bennet around 1847, it was one of three houses erected by members of the Bennet family on Shore Road in the 1840s. Moved to its present location around 1913, it remains within the grounds of Bennet's original estate. The property was originally part of the mid-eighteenth -century farm owned by Bennet's grandparents. The grandest mid-nineteenth-century house still standing in Southern Brooklyn, the Bennet-Farrell-Feldmann House is a rare and exceptionally intact Greek Revival style villa in New York City. A five-bay-wide, two-and-one-half-story frame building, the house is sheathed in its original clapboards and features characteristic Greek Revival details such as columned front and rear porches, two-story comer pilasters, denticulated cornices, molded window surrounds, and a low attic story articulated as a crowning entablature. The house has passed through the hands of several owners. The colorful Farrell family, which occupied the house from 1890 to 1912, included James P. Farrell, a successful businessman and Tammany Hall politician, his daughter, Georgina, an early woman graduate of Pratt Institute, and son, Jack, a manager-promoter for Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Today the Bennet-Farrell-Feldmann House is a tangible reminder of the borough's early history and the evolution of the Fort Hamilton-Bay Ridge neighborhood. The Bennets of New Utrecht In 1761 John Bennet, a descendant of Willem Adriaense Bennet, the first European settler of the Gowanus area of Brooklyn, married Williamtie Barkeloo, the daughter of Harmanus Barkeloo, one of the principal landowners in New Utrecht. At the time of the marriage, Barkeloo conveyed to Bennet a tract of land, extending between present-day Third Avenue and the harbor from about 94th Street to 97th Street, where he built a wood gambrel-roofed farmhouse (demolished 1955). Eventually, the northern half of the farm passed to John Bennet's daughter-in-law Mary Seguine Bennet. Around 1840, she had the property mapped for division among her three sons and her son-in-law James S. Seguine. In the early 1840s, two sons, John H. Bennet and James S. Bennet, built villas along Shore Road. The third son, Joseph S. Bennet, a coal merchant living in Manhattan, and James S. Seguine, a resident of Norfolk, Virginia, held their ten acres of land in common until 1846. That year, Mary Bennet's twin brother, Joseph Seguine,5 a wealthy Staten Island businessman who operated the Blazing Star Ferry in Rossville, died leaving considerable property to his nephew, Joseph S. Bennet. With this inheritance, Joseph S. Bennet was able to purchase James S. Seguine's interest in the New Utrecht property and to build this handsome villa on the Shore Road, not far from his grandfather's old house. The Developrrent of the Fort Hamilton Neighborhood and the Joseph Bennet House In the late 1840's, when Joseph Bennet built his new house, the transformation of the sparsely settled farming community in the township of New Utrecht to the prosperous village and fashionable resort of Fort Hamilton was well underway. A major impetus for the development of the village was the construction of a permanent casement fortress, named Fort Hamilton in honor of Alexander Hamilton, on the headlands overlooking the Narrows, between 1825 and 1831. While the fort was under construction, a number of laborers, many of whom were recent Irish immigrants, began building wooden houses to the west and north of the fort. Within a few years, a large village had developed with stores, houses, churches, and a school. Regular stage service to the town centers of New Utrecht and Gowanus, and to downtown Brooklyn, was established. Fort Hamilton was linked to Staten Island by ferry service from a wharf at the foot of Third Avenue; by the mid-nineteenth century there was also daily steamboat service to Murray Street in Manhattan. The presence of a fort and ferry in the neighborhood created a need for temporary accommodations. By the 1840s, a number of villagers had converted their homes to boarding houses. Soon, there was also a grand hotel, the Hamilton House, on Shore Road near the ferry dock, which catered to summer visitors attracted by the spectacular harbor views, ocean breezes, and beaches. By mid-century, Fort Hamilton was a popular destination for excursions fromNew York and the Hamilton House was "crowded with guests from all parts of the world." In the 1850s, the neighboring village of Yellow Hook, centered around the intersection of Third Avenue and Bay Ridge Avenue and served by a dock at the foot of Bay Ridge Avenue, also expanded rapidly. This development was encouraged by the straightening and widening of Third Avenue in 1848 and by the establishment of the Ovington

window treatments with vertical blinds
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