Canon 1. As for presbyters who sacrificed to idols, but afterwards succeeded in recovering their senses, not with any trickery, but in truth, not after previous preparations, and pretenses, and persuasions, in order to seem as though being put to tortures, but actually having these inflicted only seemingly and in sham, it has been deemed but right that they should share the honor of sitting in the seats of their class, without, however, being allowed to offer the host, or to deliver homilies, or to perform any function pertaining to priestly offices.1. As for presbyters who sacrificed to idols, but afterwards succeeded in recovering their senses, not with any trickery, but in truth, not after previous preparations, and pretenses, and persuasions, in order to seem as though being put to tortures, but actually having these inflicted only seemingly and in sham, it has been deemed but right that they should share the honor of sitting in the seats of their class, without, however, being allowed to offer the host, or to deliver homilies, or to perform any function pertaining to priestly offices.

Canon 2. As for deacons who likewise sacrificed to idols, but thereafter succeeded in recovering their senses, they are to enjoy the other marks of honor, but are to cease all sacred services, including both that of the bread and that of offering the cup, and that of preaching. But in case some of the bishops, however, should sympathize with their toil, or humility of meekness, and wish to give them something further, or to take away anything, the power shall rest with them.

Canon 3. As for those who were fleeing and were caught, or who were delivered up by their own intimates, or who otherwise had their property taken away from them, or who had to undergo tortures, or were cast into a jail, while crying out that they were Christians, and being torn to pieces, or who had anything put in their hands for violence by those employing force against them, or who had to accept some food of necessity, though confessing throughout that they were Christians, and ever exhibiting mournfulness over the occurrence in their whole make-up and their habit, and humbleness of life, they, as being without sin, are not to be excluded from communion. Even if they were excluded by someone as a matter of excessive strictness, or by some even through ignorance, they must immediately be admitted and restored to their rights. This applies likewise both to those who belong to the clergy, and to other members of the laity. A further question examined into was whether laymen can be promoted to orders if they incur the same necessity. It has been deemed but right that these persons too, as not having committed any sin, provided that their previous life has been correct and upright, be advanced to orders by imposition of hands.

Canon 4. As concerning those who have sacrificed under duress, and in addition to these, those who have eaten supper at the idols, it has been deemed fitting that those persons who in being led away thereto went up in too gay raiment, and wore luxurious clothes, and partook of the prepared supper indifferently, should do a year as listeners, and three years as kneelers. They shall partake of prayer alone for two years, and then shall come to perfection.

Canon 5. But as for those who went up with clothes of mourning, and upon reclining ate in the meantime weeping throughout the time they were reclining, if they have fulfilled the three years’ time of kneeling, let them be admitted without any offering. But if they did not eat, after doing two years of kneeling, let them commune in the third year, without any offering, in order that they may receive perfection in the fourth year. But Bishops are to have the power, after examining into the mode of the conversion, to exercise philanthropy (or charity) or to add more time to the penalty. But above all let the previous life be inquired into, and let the life thereafter be investigated, and thus shall the philanthropy be meted out in due proportion.

Canon 6. As concerning those who merely in obedience to a threat of being imprisoned and punished, and of having their property taken away, or of being forced to change their abode, have sacrificed, and up to the present time have failed to repent, and have neither been led to return, but have now come to join the Church and have become minded to return at a time coinciding with that of the Council, it has been deemed but right that until the great day they be admitted as listeners, and that after the great day they be obliged to serve three years as kneelers, and after two more years (as co-standers) they are to commune without an offering, and thus to arrive at perfection; so that they shall fulfill the whole period of six years. But if any persons were admitted to repentance before this Council convened, from that time let the term of six years be considered as having commenced. Nevertheless, if there be any danger and expectation of death ensuing from a disease or any other cause, let these persons be admitted conditionally.

Canon 7. As concerning those persons who participated in a feast on the occasion of a heathenish festival, brought their own food to it, and ate thereof, it has seemed fitting that they should be admitted after spending two years’ time in kneeling. As to whether each of them ought to be allowed the offering too, this is for the Bishops to determine, and to investigate the rest of the life of each person.

Canon 8. As for those who have sacrificed a second and a third time under com­pulsion, let them kneel for a space of four years, then commune for two years without oblation, and with the seventh be admitted unreservedly.

Canon 9. As for all who not only apostatized, but even revolted and compelled brethren, or caused them to be compelled, to apostatize, let them receive the listening station for three years, and during six years more that of kneeling, and let them then commune for a year without oblation, in order that, after doing the full stretch of ten years, they may partake of the unabridged. During this time, nevertheless, let the rest of their life be kept under surveillance.

Canon 10. As for Deacons who are appointed in spite of their condition, if they gave evidence and insisted that they would have to marry, being unable to remain single, and who thereafter have married, let them stay in service, because they have been allowed to do so by the Bishop. But if any of them have kept silent as to this, and have agreed to remain single when ordained, but thereafter entered into marriage, let them be dismissed from the deaconry.

Canon 11. As for girls that have been engaged or betrothed, and thereafter have been grabbed by other men, it has seemed best that they be given back to the men to whom they were previously betrothed, even though they have suffered violence at the hands of the former.

Canon 12. As for those who had sacrificed before baptism, and thereafter were baptized, it has seemed right to allow them to be promoted to orders, as having undergone a bath of purification.

Canon 13. Auxiliary Bishops shall have no right to ordain presbyters or deacons, but, moreover, not even city presbyters may they ordain, without being allowed to do so by the Bishop with letters in another diocese.

Canon 14. As for those presbyters or deacons who are in the clergy and who abstain from meat, it has seemed right for them to touch and taste the meat and then, if they so wish, to refrain from eating it; but if they are unwilling to eat even vegetables that have been cooked with meat, and refuse to submit to the Canon, let them be dismissed from the orders.
(Ap. c. LV.)

Canon 15. With reference to things belonging to the Lord’s house, whatever presbyters have sold in the absence of a bishop, they shall be restored to the Lord’s house. But it is to be left to the judgment of the Bishop whether the price should be paid back or not, on account of the fact that many times the profit resulting from things bought repays them more than the price they themselves paid for them.

Canon 16. As regards those who have irrationalized or who are irrationalizing, all who committed this sin before they were twenty years old must spend fifteen years in kneeling before being permitted communion in prayers, and then, after passing five years in communion, they taste of the oblation. But let their life during the term of kneeling be scrutinized, and then let them be accorded the benefit of philanthropy. But if any of them have indulged in the sin to satiety, let them have the long term of kneeling. As for those who have passed that age and who, though possessing wives, fell into the sin, let them spend twenty-five years in kneeling before receiving the right to commune in prayers; then, after they have spent five years in the communion of prayers, let them receive the oblation. But if any of them sinned when possessing wives and having passed the age of fifty years, let them receive communion only at the time of their exit from life.

Canon 17. As for those who have committed an irrational crime, and are lepers, or, more explicitly speaking, have contracted leprosy, the holy Council has commanded that these persons pray with the weather-bitten.

Canon 18. If any persons who have been appointed bishops and have not been accepted by that diocese to which they have been assigned should wish to intrude or encroach upon other dioceses, and to displace those established therein, and to excite riots against them, let them be excommunicated. If, however, they should wish to be seated in the presbytery, where they were presbyters formerly let them not be deprived of the honor. But if they engage in riots against the bishops therein established, let them be shorn of the honor of the presbytery, and let them be proscribed.

Canon 19. As for those who have promised to maintain their virginity, but break their promise, let them fulfill the term of digamists. With regard to virgins however, who are cohabiting with men as sisters,i we have prohibited this.

Canon 20. If the wife of anyone be involved in adultery or any man commit adultery, she or he, respectively, must obtain absolution in seven years, in accordance with the progressive degrees.

Canon 21. Regarding women who become prostitutes and kill their babies, and who make it their business to concoct abortives, the former rule barred them for life from communion, and they are left without recourse. But, having found a more philanthropic alternative, we have fixed the penalty at ten years, in accordance with the fixed degrees.

Canon 22. As regards wilful murders, let them kneel continually; but absolution they are to be granted only at the end of their life.

Canon 23. As regards involuntary homicide, the first rule bids the guilty one to spend seven years in order to attain to absolution in accordance with the fixed degrees; whereas the second requires him to fulfill a term of five years.

Canon 24. As for those who are practicing divination and continuing the customs of the heathen, and who are introducing persons into their homes with a view to discovering sorceries, or even with a view to purification, let them fall under the Canon of five years in accordance with the fixed degrees; three years of kneeling, and two years of prayer, without oblation.

Canon 25. When one has become engaged to a girl, but has in addition deflowered her sister too, so that she has been made pregnant by him, and he has after this married the one betrothed to him, but the one deflowered has hanged herself. Those aware of the facts have been ordered to spend ten years as co-standers in order to gain admission, in accordance with the fixed degrees.