FREE JAZZ GUITAR LESSONS : GUITAR LESSONS

FREE JAZZ GUITAR LESSONS : LEGEND OF ZELDA SHEET MUSIC FOR TRUMPET : NEW AGE MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.

Free Jazz Guitar Lessons


free jazz guitar lessons
    guitar lessons
  • The guitar is a plucked string instrument, usually played with fingers or a pick. The guitar consists of a body with a rigid neck to which the strings, generally six in number but sometimes more, are attached.
    free jazz
  • Free jazz is an approach to jazz music that was first developed in the 1950s and 1960s. Though the music produced by free jazz pioneers varied widely, the common feature was a dissatisfaction with the limitations of bebop, hard bop, and modal jazz, which had developed in the 1940s and 1950s.
  • An improvised style of jazz characterized by the absence of set chord patterns or time patterns
  • Typically after playing a quick theme the improvisation of this style does not follow any particular chordal structure. Dispensed with the rules of rhythm, pitch, and development (not necessarily atonal or without pulse) colourful music punctuated by the imagination of the performer.
  • Any form of jazz that uses free improvisation

• Charlie Hunter, 2004 Monterey JazzFest, CA
• Charlie Hunter, 2004 Monterey JazzFest, CA
• Charlie Hunter • is an American guitarist, composer and bandleader. [b. 05.23, 1967] • First coming to prominence in the early 1990s, Hunter has recorded 17 albums. Hunter plays custom-made seven and eight-string guitars, on which he simultaneously plays basslines, rhythm guitar, and solos. Critic Sean Westergaard[2] describes Hunter's guitar technique as "mind-boggling ... he's an agile improviser with an ear for great tone, and always has excellent players alongside him in order to make great music, not to show off." • Hunter currently plays a custom-made, seven-string guitar made by Jeff Traugott. Previously, Hunter played a custom-made, eight-string guitar made by luthier Ralph Novak of Novax Guitars. He plays the lead guitar on the top five strings (tuned ADGBe) and bass guitar (tuned EAD) on the bottom three strings simultaneously. With the addition of a Hughes & Kettner Tube Rotosphere (a Leslie rotary speaker simulator), his unique style produces a sound similar to that of a Hammond organ -- an instrument he set out to imitate. • In 2006, Hunter removed the top guitar string and had the neck of his guitar reworked and now plays a modified 7-string on the formerly-8 string body. Hunter has mentioned that because of his small hands, he had to move out of position to make use of the 8th string and thus wasn't using it much. A change in Hunter's style away from the organ sound into a more blues and distortion based sound happened at the same time. After removing the 8th string, Hunter retuned all of the strings up a half step: F-A#-D# on the bass and A#-D#-G#-C on the guitar. As of 2008, he had once again retuned up a minor 3rd: G-C-F on the bass and C-F-A#-D on the guitar. • Hunter was born in Rhode Island. When he was four his mom packed him and his younger sister in an old yellow school bus and headed west. After several years living on a commune in Mendocino County they settled in Berkeley, California. Hunter graduated from Berkeley High School and took lessons from famed guitar teacher Joe Satriani. At eighteen he moved to Paris. Returning to the Bay area, Hunter played a seven-string guitar and organ in Michael Franti's political rap group, The Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy. In 1992, they were one of the opening acts for U2's Zoo TV Tour. • Since the debut of his self-titled Charlie Hunter Trio in 1993, Charlie Hunter has recorded 17 albums. He co-founded Garage A Trois, a jazz fusion band with Stanton Moore and Skerik. He has collaborated with Bobby Previte for an ongoing project entitled "Groundtruther." He also recorded and toured for Bobby Previte's The Coalition of the Willing in 2006.[3] He appears on acclaimed jazz bassist Christian McBride's Live At Tonic. On both The Coalition of the Willing and Live at Tonic he plays 6-string guitars. His earliest known released recording without unusual guitars is as a guest bassist for the band Sweet Potato from California's East Bay. The song "Crankshaft" can be found on the Ubiquity Records compilation Mo Cookin from 1994 and the song "Monkey Wrench" can be found on the Ubiquity Records compilation Still Cookin from 1995. He also plays guitar on the track "Me and Chuck" from the Les Claypool and the Holy Mackerel album, Highball with the Devil, released in 1996. • Charlie played in the band T.J. Kirk active 1990s that merged the music of Thelonious Monk, James Brown, and Rahsaan Roland Kirk. T.J Kirk is: Will Bernard - Guitar, John Schott - Guitar, Charlie Hunter - 8-string guitar and Scott Amendola - Drums. Three recordings of the time are called: T.J. Kirk August 8, 1995, If Four Was One September 24, 1996 and Talking Only Makes it Worse released in 2005. Hunter contributed to three songs for D'Angelo's Voodoo (2000), including "The Root".[4] Hunter has stated that the session for the song was the most challenging session he has worked on. • In the summer of 2007, Charlie toured with a trio that included New York keyboardist Erik Deutsch and New York/New Orleans drummer Simon Lott. This trio recorded the July, 2007 Fantasy release Mistico. In 2008, Hunter recorded his first self-release, "Baboon Strength. Featured on the record are Erik Deutch on keys and Tony Mason on drums. Hunter will return to the studio in Fall of 2009 to record with drummer Eric Kalb. • In 2008, eminent clarinetist and composer Ben Goldberg put together a project entitled "Go Home" with Charlie on guitar(s), Ron Miles (trumpet) and Scott Amendola (drums). The alternately funky, beautiful, spacious and deep compositions showcase all the musicians. The group will be performing at the Jazz Standard in New York in late October, early November, 2009 (Oct. 29 to Nov. 1) with Curtis Fowlkes on trombone, replacing Miles on trumpet. Hunter was also an inaugural member of the Independent Music Awards' judging panel to support independent artists.[5] Hunter believes in free trade of his live sho
Otto
Otto
August 20, 2009 Brazilian, but With a Different Beat By LARRY ROHTER In the world of Brazilian music Otto occupies a place as unusual and unlikely as his name. For more than a decade he has been thought of as the guy who combines the textures of electronica with the traditional African-derived rhythms he first heard growing up in a small town in the interior — a kind of Moby from the backlands. But as Otto prepares for the release of a new CD, his fourth, and the show he is scheduled to perform Friday night as part of Lincoln Center’s Out of Doors series, chill-out, drum ’n’ bass and lounge music seem to be far from his mind. Otto, known on his passport as Otto Maximiliano Pereira de Cordeiro Ferreira, hasn’t exactly renounced his recent past. Yet he makes it clear that he is now seeking a more organic sound. “I started in electronica because it was easier, something you could do quickly and cheaply, and that made it the ideal path” for a solo artist just beginning his career, he said in an interview at a Manhattan hotel. “I mean, two-thirds of global electronica was already Brazilian music anyway, so I always felt I could decode that and transform it into something else.” Transformation continues to be Otto’s watchword. But as he has matured and traveled and read and been exposed to new influences, he has responded by casting his net wider and wider, so that electronica is now only one of numerous ingredients in his wide-ranging music. “To me Otto is the personification of synthesis, with an ability to swallow a thousand different things and create something new,” said Ricardo Pessanha, co-author of “The Brazilian Sound: Samba, Bossa Nova and the Popular Music of Brazil” (Temple University Press, 2009). “He’s not a great singer and is never going to be a huge commercial success, because his commitment is not to what is popular or what sells. He’s the hillbilly who clears pathways and unlocks closed doors, chopping his way through the jungle and opening frontiers so that others can follow.” That eclecticism began with Otto’s own background and upbringing. Born in 1968, he recalls hearing fife-and-drum bands on the street as a child, remembers the rhythms he tried to pound out as he listened to his parents’ records of samba and Brazilian country music, and marvels at how he was energized by punk and its “do it yourself” credo. “I’m completely a mixture, of nationalities and ethnicities,” he said. “I’m Dutch and Portuguese combined with Indian and mulatto, precisely the blend that made my country the incredible, inventive place it is.” At the age of 21, though, Otto headed for Paris, trying to woo a girlfriend. He was a busker there for a time but learned French and ended up playing percussion in the band of Raul de Souza, the Brazilian trombonist probably best known in the United States for his work with Sonny Rollins, Cal Tjader and George Duke. Returning to his home state of Pernambuco in northeast Brazil, Otto quickly became a part of the mangue bit movement, which fused home-grown rhythms like the maracatu, frevo and ciranda with the latest in imported computer and studio technology. He played percussion in both Nacao Zumbi and Mundo Livre S/A, the movement’s two most important bands, before releasing “Samba Pra Burro,” his first solo disc, in 1998. “Samba Pra Burro” was voted record of the year in many Brazilian polls, and also became an international hit, with several tracks being praised by bands like Oasis and emerging as favorites on the dance floor and fashion runways. “Bob,” a moody, ambient piece with hints of bossa nova and a Nacao Zumbi sample, written and performed by Otto and Bebel Gilberto in two versions that open and close the CD, drew the most attention and seemed to be the blueprint for a whole new approach to Brazilian pop. Two more CDs, whose titles Otto has tattooed on his arms, the groove-heavy “Condom Black” and the more pop-oriented “Sem Gravidade,” followed quickly, and found Otto expanding his palette: to rap on “Cuba,” rock on “Pelo Engarrafamento” and romantic pop balladry on “Por Que.” Together the discs comprise what he calls “a real trilogy, a phase or cycle, one that had a beginning and an end and had to give way to a new sonority with more melody.” In person, trying to explain his music and life, Otto is restless, with energy to burn. Curly-haired, burly and amiable, he fidgets and squirms as he talks, and his thoughts shift rapidly from one subject to another, an exercise in free association that helps explain both the fecundity of his imagination and the critical success he has enjoyed. “Otto is the artist who never stops, like Tom Ze or my father,” Ms. Gilberto, a close friend, said, referring to one of the leaders of the Tropicalist movement and Joao Gilberto, a pioneer of the bossa nova, both of them northeasterners who have influenced Otto. “He’s always creating, thinking, inventing, with ideas gushing out of him continuously. Whether he’s playing an ins

free jazz guitar lessons
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