WATCH THE BOY WHO COULD FLY. WATCH THE BOY

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Watch The Boy Who Could Fly


watch the boy who could fly
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  • (Watch This) "Watch This" is the title of a country music song written by Ron Harbin, Aaron Barker and Anthony L. Smith. It was recorded by American singer Clay Walker on his 1997 album Rumor Has It, from which it was released as a single late that year.
    boy
  • Used to express strong feelings, esp. of excitement or admiration
  • a friendly informal reference to a grown man; "he likes to play golf with the boys"
  • son: a male human offspring; "their son became a famous judge"; "his boy is taller than he is"
  • male child: a youthful male person; "the baby was a boy"; "she made the boy brush his teeth every night"; "most soldiers are only boys in uniform"
    fly
  • Used in names of flying insects of other orders, e.g., butterfly, dragonfly, firefly
  • An infestation of flying insects on a plant or animal
  • A flying insect of a large order characterized by a single pair of transparent wings and sucking (and often also piercing) mouthparts. Flies are noted as vectors of disease
  • (British informal) not to be deceived or hoodwinked
  • travel through the air; be airborne; "Man cannot fly"
  • two-winged insects characterized by active flight

step off
step off
In Greek mythology, Icarus was the son of the artificer Daedalus. Icarus was famous for his death by falling into the Icarian Sea near Icaria, the island southwest of Samos that still bears his name, when he flew too close to the sun, melting the wax holding his artificial wings together. Story of Icarus The Fall of Icarus as told by Thomas Bulfinch: "Daedalus built the labrynth for King Minos, but afterwards lost the favour of the king, and was shut up in a tower. He contrived to make his escape from his prison, but could not leave the island by sea, as the king kept strict watch on all the vessels, and permitted none to sail without being carefully searched. “Minos may control the land and sea,” said Daedalus, “but not the regions of the air. I will try that way.” So he set to work to fabricate wings for himself and his young son Icarus. He wrought feathers together, beginning with the smallest and adding larger, so as to form an increasing surface. The larger ones he secured with thread and the smaller with wax, and gave the whole a gentle curvature like the wings of a bird. Icarus, the boy, stood and looked on, sometimes running to gather up the feathers which the wind had blown away, and then handling the wax and working it over with his fingers, by his play impeding his father in his labours. When at last the work was done, the artist, waving his wings, found himself buoyed upward, and hung suspended, poising himself on the beaten air. He next equipped his son in the same manner and taught him how to fly, as a bird tempts her young ones from the lofty nest into the air. When all was prepared for flight he said, “Icarus, my son, I charge you to keep at a moderate height, for if you fly too low the damp will clog your wings, and if too high the heat will melt them. Keep near me and you will be safe.” While he gave him these instructions and fitted the wings to his shoulders, the face of the father was wet with tears, and his hands trembled. He kissed the boy, not knowing that it was for the last time. Then rising on his wings, he flew off, encouraging him to follow, and looked back from his own flight to see how his son managed his wings. As they flew the ploughman stopped his work to gaze, and the shepherd leaned on his staff and watched them, astonished at the sight, and thinking they were gods who could thus cleave the air. "They passed Samos and Delos on the left and Lebynthos on the right, when the boy, exulting in his career, began to leave the guidance of his companion and soar upward as if to reach heaven. The nearness of the blazing sun softened the wax which held the feathers together, and they came off. He fluttered with his arms, but no feathers remained to hold the air. While his mouth uttered cries to his father it was submerged in the blue waters of the sea which thenceforth was called by his name. His father cried, “Icarus, Icarus, where are you?” At last he saw the feathers floating on the water, and bitterly lamenting his own arts, he buried the body and called the land Icaria in memory of his child. Daedalus arrived safe in Sicily, where he built a temple to Apollo, and hung up his wings, an offering to the god."
Trepidation...
Trepidation...
Life is a weird thing; so complex, so exceptional and full of potential… The other day I was walking down a dirt road here in Afghanistan when all of a sudden I’m jolted by the roar of multiple missiles being fired from nearby. I watched the missiles fly right over me. The bright orange glow from the weaponry’s propulsion was visible even in daylight. I couldn’t help but think of the enemy out there, doing whatever it was they were doing, wherever they were at, oblivious to the thunderous calamity about to rain down upon them, destroying their life forever. I just hoped no innocent Afghan citizens to include blameless children were unfortunate enough to be in the right spot at the wrong time… The incident only last a few seconds but it was a profound experience. I had never been so close to launching rockets such as these and as I looked up and observed the multiple flying warheads, a sense of dread came over me; trepidation for the planet and the entire human race… A few days ago I had a visitor to my flickr stream. This gentleman left a couple comments on two of my photos addressing the issue of global warming. He was pointing me to what a panel of “experts” had to say on the subject. My reply was… Humans have been historically wrong on just about everything from day one. The earth was flat, flight was impossible and there were only nine planets. How many times are the "known facts" rebuked due to further archeological finds? Truth is scientists know little of what they speak, and 100, 200 and 1000 years from now, our modern day scientists will be looked upon as we look upon those who truly believed the earth was flat. Scientists are some of the most closed minded people ever - just like dictators who rule with an iron fist; until something comes along to force them to believe something else, they will not even fathom other possibilities. The human race will only advance through trial and error – I just want to know how many times scientists have to be proved wrong before their little minds can accept the fact that wondrous and extraordinary things beyond their wildest dreams and imaginations are possible. We just haven’t figured them out yet. Modern day science is a joke to me, to be honest. We need humble, open minded scientists who realize their meek understanding of the world will be considered null and void, if not comical in 1000 years by future scientists whom, I hope by this time, will have broken the cycle of closed mindedness! The above comment by me bodes the same contentment I have with my government and the entire business of corporate earth. We are so primitive, us humans! And I believe, well… I hope the next evolutionary milestone Mankind experiences is true and pure open-mindedness. Nine young Afghan children cutting wood in a field a couple days ago met their demise by an airstrike of some sort. Nine kids without a clue, working in a field full of life one moment and the next torn to shreds, their lives extinguished as if they had never even existed...

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