Canadian History For Kids

    canadian history
  • The history of Canada begins with the arrival of Paleo-Indians thousands of years ago. Canada has been inhabited for millennia by distinctive groups of Aboriginal peoples, who evolved trade, spiritual and social hierarchies systems.
    for kids
  • 4Kids Entertainment (commonly known as 4Kids) is a Worldwide International American film and television production company. It is known for English-dubbing Japanese anime, specializing in the acquisition, production and licensing of children's entertainment around the United States.
  • The Sport Ju-Jutsu system for kids is designed to stimulate movement and to encourage the kids natural joy of moving their bodies. The kids train all exercises from Sport Ju-Jutsu but many academys leave out punches and kicks for their youngest athlethes.
  • Virtual Stadium Tours
canadian history for kids
canadian history for kids - The Kids
The Kids Book of Canadian History
The Kids Book of Canadian History
Canada has a rich and fascinating history. In this informative overview, kids will discover the people, places and events that have shaped our country. Featuring fact boxes, mini-profiles, maps, a timeline and more, this title in the acclaimed Kids Book of series offers a comprehensive and engaging look at Canada's development, change and growth. Kids can read about * the potlatch ceremonies of the west coast Aboriginal people * the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway * the battle of Vimy Ridge in World War I * the role of Canadian women in World War II * the establishment of Nunavut, Canada's newest territory, and more ...

Parc Downsview Park ::: No Home for the Arrow!
Parc Downsview Park ::: No Home for the Arrow!
YOU'VE GOT TO WONDER where these condescending Crown organizations find those bureaucratic disconnects who are so far removed from any passionate knowledge of the history of Canada that they would attempt to replace 65 Carl Hall Road with hockey arenas. There are a hundred other sites WITHIN Parc Downsview Park's 572 acres that could house a 4-plex hockey arena, but some yahoo wants to bulldoze the Canadian Air and Space Museum and put it there. In the old days, at the turn of the last century we use to horse-whip individuals who dared to sally forth with such tomfoolery. Now, we actually hear them out. I'm all for Canada maintaining hockey dominance on the international scene…but not at the expense of our great Canadian aviation history. Aviation is another area where Canada ONCE dominated, however briefly, and we need to acknowledge that. Young Canadians need to see and reflect on our past. And where better than at the actual historic site of the de Havilland Aircraft Company of Canada, right where their first plant was located at 65 Carl Hall Road. De Havilland first produced British designed aircraft (de Havilland Moths) under licence in order to train up Canadian airmen across the country in the 30s. But, later in the 40s, over 1100 units of the legendary de Havilland Mosquito were produced at 65 Carl Hall Road for action in WW II. In the Cold War, over 200 of these Canadian-made Downsview Mosquitos saw fighting action again, and were involved in Communist suppression in China, by a then-decree of the Canadian government. Bigger projects were in store for Downsview's de Havilland Aircraft Company of Canada, though. The De Havilland Aircraft Company of Canada went on to design and manufacture 8 wholly Canadian aircraft. You might have heard of some of them. 1) DHC-1 Chipmunk 2) DHC-2 Beaver 3) DHC-3 Otter 4) DHC-4 Caribou 5) DHC-5 Buffalo 6) DHC-6 Twin Otter 7) DHC-7 Dash 7 8) DHC-8 Dash 8 The first four designs were exclusive to 65 Carl Hall Road and the nearby hangers. The Caribou, Buffalo, Twin Otter, Dash 7, and Dash 8 were manufactured on the south side of Downsview airfield at the Garratt Blvd facility. The Dash 8 continues on as the Bombardier Q400 which is still in commercial production today. The Cold War fostered the development of a Canadian Guided Missile Division, located, guess where? I'll give you a hint, its on Carl Hall Road. This era drew a whole new breed of scientists with a whole new agenda. This time in space. The Canadian-built Alouette I satellite was both designed and assembled at 65 Carl Hall Road. The Alouette I became the first satellite in the world—that would be put into space by a country, other than the USA, or the USSR. SPAR began right here as well. SPAR, you remember, went on to produce the Canada Arm for NASA's space shuttles. In spite of all this rich history, Parc Downsview Park has the bulldozers on stand-by to level 65 Carl Hall Road. Six months and counting down… Parc Downsview Park advertises itself as a place for all Peoples. It's just not Canadian friendly. Isn't it funny that no matter what noble thing people try to do, I'm thinking of the thousands of Canadian Air and Space Museum volunteers that have put hundreds of thousands of hours into restoring historical Canadian aircraft (Tracker, Lancaster, CF-5 etc) or restoring historical Canadian jet engines (Jetliner Derwent, the Orenda 5 etc) building another Arrow(see above photo), or hosting great aviation history commemorative events that even Jim Floyd attended…there's always some Judas waiting in the wings to push his own petty agenda, and ruin everything. There is one more thing Canadians need to know. OF ALL THE GTA AIRFIELDS that were a part of Canada's EARLY robust aviation history: ? Armour Heights Field 1917-1919 ? Barker Field 1927-1953 ? Leaside Aerodrome 1927-1931 ? Long Branch Aerodrome 1915-1919 ? Toronto Aerodrome 1928-1939 Only Downsview Airfield 1929–present STILL remains. That's right, just Downsview! Downsview remains connected to its illustrious aviation past with one operational airfield still owned and managed by Bombardier Aerospace (the successors to de Havilland Canada) and ALSO through the existence of the Canadian Air and Space Museum at 65 Carl Hall Road who should also be the final tenants at number 65. The Canadian Air and Space Museum (CASM) resides in the hanger that once was the original manufacturing building of de Havilland Canada. Well, that ongoing historical residence is quite precarious now. The Canadian Air and Space Museum last week was tendered its eviction notice September 20, 2011 from the Parc Downsview Park (a Crown corporation) because they were $100,000 in rent arrears. Why the Canadian Air and Space Museum was paying ANY RENT, and why they don't also have the former associated de Havilland hanger unit in their possession…just boggles my Canadian mind. So I guess the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 1953.
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 1953.
Landmark Books were a series of history books published in the 1950's for children. I loved reading them as a kid, but got most of them from the library where the had dull covers without dustjackets. I've been picking some up at thrift shops. I really enjoy the cover art, and since I seem to barely be able to make a dent in my monthly upload limit, I'm sharing them with you.
canadian history for kids
canadian history for kids
The Kids Book of Black Canadian History
From the first Black person who came to Canada about 400 years ago to the most recent wave of African immigrants, Black Canadians have played an important role in our country's history. In this informative overview, kids will discover the inspiring stories and events of a people who fought oppression as they searched for a place to call their own. Featuring fact boxes, mini-profiles, a timeline and more, this book in the acclaimed Kids Book of series offers a glimpse into an often-overlooked part of Canadian history.