WHEEL HORSE TILLERS. WHEEL HORSE

WHEEL HORSE TILLERS. FOLDING SHOPPING TROLLEYS ON WHEELS

Wheel Horse Tillers


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  • An intimate friend, one's right hand man.
  • Wheel Horse was a manufacturer of outdoor and garden power equipment, including lawn and garden tractors. The company's headquarters were in South Bend, Indiana.
  • A horse harnessed nearest the wheels of a vehicle
  • A responsible and hardworking person, esp. an experienced and conscientious member of a political party
  • a draft horse harnessed behind others and nearest the wheels of a vehicle

The History of Bristol Motor Co. Ltd
The History of Bristol Motor Co. Ltd
Article Published in the Illustrated Bristol News 1962 ON AN OCTOBER DAY in 1912 a young Bristol motor engineer put down the blueprint he had been studying closely. ‘We’ll buy one’, he said. That order placed just six days after the first customer had signed for one was for a new make of car which was about to be introduced by a newcomer to the motor industry. It was an order that, 50 years later, still shows the foresight of the man who made it. For the car Mr. Arthur Edward Johnson, manager (later managing director) of Bristol Motor Company Limited, deelded to buy without ever having seen was the Morris Oxford, made by Mr. W. R. Morris. The Bristol company have always pioneered the way for others. In 1898 they ran the first charabanc outing in the West Country; next year they opened the the first motor public transport system in the city, from the bottom of Blackboy Hill to the top of Westbury Hill; they made the original Bristol car in 1902 and two years later became the first to experiment with aluminium pistons and so one could go on. They are now one of the biggest Morris distributors in the country and this year are celebrating the 50-year association with the Nuflield organisation which began when Mr. Johnson became the third person to order a Morris car. They also distribute the Riley, the Vanden Plas Princess (British Motor Corporation’s VIP car), Rolls-Royce and Bentley and Morris Commercial Vehicles. Lord Nuffield the Mr. Morris from whom that first car had been ordered— thought so highly of the firm that in 1931 (when he was still Sir William Morris) he came to the city to open their new works at Ashton Gate. The showrooms and familiar clock tower have since become features of the district. Mr. Johnson, who died in 1948, is believed to have made the first car trip from Bristol to London and not long before his death wrote, ‘so I celebrate my golden jubilee in the motor trade. From the dusty and slimy surfaces and frightened horses of the late 19th and early 20th century roads, when to apply brakes would be to skid all over the road or to fire one’s brakes (the then most suitable linings being made of leather or poplar wood); from the days when it was a wonderful event to drive five miles without a compulsory stop... to the days when a motorist with no mechanical instincts can drive thousands of miles without giving his car attention’. In the 1890’s he owned a motor tricycle and his early experience in the business was gained at Mr. W. M. Appleton’s Boulevard Cycle Depot, Weston-super-Mare. The first time he tried to sell a motor vehicle there he was overwhelmed with questions that were difficult to answer satisfactorily — like ‘How can you be sure the machine won’t catch fire?’ or ‘How can I keep respectable on dusty roads ?‘. But he persevered, and in 1898 Mr. Appleton, sole proprietor of Bristol Motor Company, in Redcross Street, Bristol, offered him the management. The new manager took the tiller of a Daimler wagonette on the West Country’s first charabanc outing which was held that same year. It is recorded that the outing was made ‘with the minimum of compulsory stops’. The bus service from Blackboy Hill to Westbury the following year ran into trouble when the wind kept blowing out the bunsen burners used to heat the ignition tubes and the two vehicles on the route had to be converted to electric ignition. The increased power this gave made the tiller steering dangerous and steering wheels had to be fitted. Three years after the buses began running, the first-ever Bristol car, a 10/12 h.p. twin-cylinder model, was made by the company. A 16/20 h.p. four-cylinder model came out three years later and a 1906 model can still be seen in Bristol Museum. In 1910 the sales and service side of the business was taken over by the Bristol Wagon and Carriage Works but normal business was soon disrupted by the first World War, during which the Company played an important part in helping to sustain home food production by their work on farm tractors. Changes of fortune followed, but in 1921 Mr. Johnson re-established the company. He became managing director and secretary; the chairman of the board (which also included Mr. G. Falconar Fry and Mr. T. A. Hill) was Mr. Edgar J. Jenkins. The managing director today is Mr. D. H. Phillips who joined the company in 1928, and the other directors are Mr. V. Fuller Eberle, M.C. (chairman) and Mr. A. R. Boucher. From the old Bristol Wagon Works premises at 136-138 Victoria Street, the company spread the following year to a hall in Mill Lane, Bedminster. In 1924 premises in Thomas Street and Pile Street and a site at 147 Victoria Street were acquired; three years later new premises were opened on the site and 47 Queen’s Road was bought as showrooms. In 1927 the Triangle Garage, Clifton, was rented and in 1928 the site of the Ashton Gate works was bought. When it was opened three years later it was the largest service and repair depot in the city and
Birth of the motorcar Bristol
Birth of the motorcar Bristol
HISTORIES OF BRISTOL COMPANIES 1890 the staff of Bristol Motor Company BS3 pose for the camera outside the main gate to Ashton Court. - Bristol Motor Company Limited, were one of the biggest Morris distributors in the country. ON AN OCTOBER DAY in 1912 a young Bristol motor engineer put down the blueprint he had been studying closely. ‘We’ll buy one’, he said. That order placed just six days after the first customer had signed for one was for a new make of car which was about to be introduced by a newcomer to the motor industry. It was an order that, 50 years later, still shows the foresight of the man who made it. For the car Mr. Arthur Edward Johnson, manager (later managing director) of Bristol Motor Company Limited, decided to buy without ever having seen was the Morris Oxford, made by Mr. W. R. Morris. The Bristol company have always pioneered the way for others. In 1898 they ran the first charabanc outing in the West Country; next year they opened the the first motor public transport system in the city, from the bottom of Blackboy Hill to the top of Westbury Hill; they made the original Bristol car in 1902 and two years later became the first to experiment with aluminium pistons and so one could go on. They are now one of the biggest Morris distributors in the country and this year are celebrating the 50-year association with the Nuflield organisation which began when Mr. Johnson became the third person to order a Morris car. They also distribute the Riley, the Vanden Plas Princess (British Motor Corporation’s VIP car), Rolls-Royce and Bentley and Morris Commercial Vehicles. Lord Nuffield the Mr. Morris from whom that first car had been ordered— thought so highly of the firm that in 1931 (when he was still Sir William Morris) he came to the city to open their new works at Ashton Gate. The showrooms and familiar clock tower have since become features of the district. Mr. Johnson, who died in 1948, is believed to have made the first car trip from Bristol to London and not long before his death wrote, ‘so I celebrate my golden jubilee in the motor trade. From the dusty and slimy surfaces and frightened horses of the late 19th and early 20th century roads, when to apply brakes would be to skid all over the road or to fire one’s brakes (the then most suitable linings being made of leather or poplar wood); from the days when it was a wonderful event to drive five miles without a compulsory stop... to the days when a motorist with no mechanical instincts can drive thousands of miles without giving his car attention’. In the 1890’s he owned a motor tricycle and his early experience in the business was gained at Mr. W. M. Appleton’s Boulevard Cycle Depot, Weston-super-Mare. The first time he tried to sell a motor vehicle there he was overwhelmed with questions that were difficult to answer satisfactorily — like ‘How can you be sure the machine won’t catch fire?’ or ‘How can I keep respectable on dusty roads ?‘. But he persevered, and in 1898 Mr. Appleton, sole proprietor of Bristol Motor Company, in Redcross Street, Bristol, offered him the management. The new manager took the tiller of a Daimler wagonette on the West Country’s first charabanc outing which was held that same year. It is recorded that the outing was made ‘with the minimum of compulsory stops’. The bus service from Blackboy Hill to Westbury the following year ran into trouble when the wind kept blowing out the bunsen burners used to heat the ignition tubes and the two vehicles on the route had to be converted to electric ignition. The increased power this gave made the tiller steering dangerous and steering wheels had to be fitted. Three years after the buses began running, the first-ever Bristol car, a 10/12 h.p. twin-cylinder model, was made by the company. A 16/20 h.p. four-cylinder model came out three years later and a 1906 model can still be seen in Bristol Museum. In 1910 the sales and service side of the business was taken over by the Bristol Wagon and Carriage Works but normal business was soon disrupted by the first World War, during which the Company played an important part in helping to sustain home food production by their work on farm tractors. Changes of fortune followed, but in 1921 Mr. Johnson re-established the company. He became managing director and secretary; the chairman of the board (which also included Mr. G. Falconar Fry and Mr. T. A. Hill) was Mr. Edgar J. Jenkins. The managing director today is Mr. D. H. Phillips who joined the company in 1928, and the other directors are Mr. V. Fuller Eberle, M.C. (chairman) and Mr. A. R. Boucher. From the old Bristol Wagon Works premises at 136-138 Victoria Street, the company spread the following year to a hall in Mill Lane, Bedminster. In 1924 premises in Thomas Street and Pile Street and a site at 147 Victoria Street were acquired; three years later new premises were opened on the site and 47 Queen’s Road was bought as showrooms. In 1927 the Triangle Gar

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