FACTS ABOUT THE SKELETAL SYSTEM : THE SKELETAL SYSTEM

FACTS ABOUT THE SKELETAL SYSTEM : INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT WORLD HUNGER : SPACE FOR KIDS FACTS

Facts About The Skeletal System


    skeletal system
  • One of eleven major body organ systems in animals; supports the body, protects internal organs, and, with the muscular system, allows movement and locomotion. PICTURE
  • the hard structure (bones and cartilages) that provides a frame for the body of an animal
  • The human skeleton consists of both fused and individual bones supported and supplemented by ligaments, tendons, muscles and cartilage. It serves as a scaffold which supports organs, anchors muscles, and protects organs such as the brain, lungs and heart.
    about the
  • Oxford Dictionary for Writers & Editors
  • Qatsi films: "It's not that we use technology, we live technology. Technology has become as ubiquitous as the air we breathe, so we are no longer conscious of its presence.
    facts
  • (fact) a piece of information about circumstances that exist or events that have occurred; "first you must collect all the facts of the case"
  • (fact) an event known to have happened or something known to have existed; "your fears have no basis in fact"; "how much of the story is fact and how much fiction is hard to tell"
  • (fact) a statement or assertion of verified information about something that is the case or has happened; "he supported his argument with an impressive array of facts"
  • A thing that is indisputably the case
  • Used in discussing the significance of something that is the case
  • A piece of information used as evidence or as part of a report or news article
facts about the skeletal system
facts about the skeletal system - The Skeletal
The Skeletal System Giant Chart
The Skeletal System Giant Chart
One of our most popular charts is now available in a large format, 42 inches wide x 62 inches high. Printed on durable, tear-resistant flexible plastic, with a write-on/wipe-off surface (with dry erase pen), this oversize chart is perfect for teaching and demonstration. Three eyelets across the top make it easy to hang.
The chart contains the classic skeletal illustrations by Peter Bachin. It shows anterior, lateral, and posterior views of the skeletal system and illustrates portion of long bone, auditory ossicles, ligaments of the right hand (dorsal and palmar views), ligaments of the right foot (dorsal and plantar views), and the right knee joint (anterior and posterior views).

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McCarren Play Center
McCarren Play Center
Greenpoint, Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States The McCarren Play Center is one of a group of eleven immense outdoor swimming pools opened in the summer of 1936 in a series of grand ceremonies presided over by Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia and Park Commissioner Robert Moses. All of the pools were constructed largely with funding provided by the Works Progress Administration (WPA), one of many New Deal agencies created in the 1930s to address the Great Depression. Designed to accommodate a total of 49,000 users simultaneously at locations scattered throughout New York City’s five boroughs, the new pool complexes quickly gained recognition as being among the most remarkable public facilities constructed in the country. The pools were completed just two and a half years after the LaGuardia administration took office, and all but one survives relatively intact today. While each of the 1936 swimming pool complexes is especially notable for its distinctive and unique design, the eleven facilities shared many of the same basic components. The complexes generally employed low-cost building materials, principally brick and cast concrete, and often utilized the streamlined and curvilinear forms of the popular 1930s Art Moderne style. Sited in existing older parks or built on other city- owned land, the grounds surrounding the pool complexes were executed on a similarly grand scale, and included additional recreation areas, connecting pathway systems, and comfort stations. The team of designers, landscape architects and engineers assembled to execute the new pool complexes was comprised largely of staff members and consultants who had earlier worked for Moses at other governmental agencies, including architect Aymar Embury II, landscape architects Gilmore D. Clarke and Allyn R. Jennings, and civil engineers W. Earle Andrews and William H. Latham. Surviving documents also indicate that Moses, himself a long-time swimming enthusiast, gave detailed attention to the designs for the new pool complexes. The size of the swimming pool at the McCarren Play Center (165’ x 330’), dedicated on July 31, 1936, is matched only by two of the other 1936 play center pools: Astoria and Betsy Head. Semi-circular diving and wading pools flank the swimming pool, an arrangement duplicated at both Sunset Play Center and Astoria Play Center. Contemporary sources indicated, however, that the capacity of the McCarren Play Center bath house exceeds by a few hundred that of the other ten play centers, including Astoria. The immense scale of the McCarren Play Center is powerfully expressed in the monumental forms of the main entryway, a massive cubic block topped by a set-back gallery. Giant arches emphasized by decorative brick patterning span the openings giving onto the street and swimming pool, while the smooth light-colored walls in the upper portion of the open courtyard reflect the light entering from above and add to the dramatic character of this space. Other notable features of the entryway include the Art Moderne ticket booth, the rounded jambs of the entrances into the locker rooms, and the decorative metal work in their transoms. Wide arches duplicated at a smaller scale than those of the main entryway link the separate comfort stations to the north and south ends of the bath house structure, further enhancing its monumentality. The landscaped setting, including linking pathways, additional play areas and plantings, was contemporary with the construction of the McCarren Play Center. Although the McCarren Play Center was last open in the summer of 1983, the Parks Department, with the support of local elected officials and community groups, is committed to renovating, restoring and reopening the pool and bath house/recreation building. Meanwhile, since 2005, the pool and deck of the McCarren Play Center have been used for concerts, film screenings, performances, and other public events, which have greatly increased the visibility of the pool and have catalyzed interim improvements. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS History of the McCarren Play Center Site The McCarren Play Center is set within the 35.71-acre McCarren Park, in the southern portion of the Brooklyn neighborhood known as Greenpoint. Sited near the Greenpoint-Williamsburg border, McCarren Park serves both neighborhoods and features ball fields, playgrounds, a running track, and large, grassy areas for picnicking and sunbathing. Located in the northernmost portion of Brooklyn, Greenpoint is historically one of New York City’s industrial centers. Prior to the nineteenth century, Greenpoint remained relatively isolated due to its geography; it is surrounded by water on three sides—the East River on the western shore and Newton Creek to the north and east. Historically a small creek separated Greenpoint from Williamsburg at its southern boundary, further isolating the area. This creek, which was called Bushwick Creek, was later filled and was located approxim
Lorem image 1
Lorem image 1
Sleep is a naturally recurring state characterized by reduced or absent consciousness, relatively suspended sensory activity, and inactivity of nearly all voluntary muscles.[1] It is distinguished from quiet wakefulness by a decreased ability to react to stimuli, and is more easily reversible than being in hibernation or a coma. Sleep is also a heightened anabolic state, accentuating the growth and rejuvenation of the immune, nervous, skeletal and muscular systems. It is observed in all mammals, all birds, and many reptiles, amphibians, and fish. The purposes and mechanisms of sleep are only partially clear and are the subject of intense research.[2] Sleep is often thought to help conserve energy,[3][4] but actually decreases metabolism only about 5–10%.[3][4] Hibernating animals need to sleep despite the hypometabolism seen in hibernation, and in fact they must return from hypothermia to euthermy in order to sleep, making sleeping "energetically expensive."[5]

facts about the skeletal system
facts about the skeletal system
The Human Body: A Scholarly Essay on the 11 major organ systems.
The human body is made up of eleven major organ systems. These eleven systems are the skeletal, muscular, circulatory, nervous, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine, reproductive, integumentary and lymphatic systems. The Skeletal systems main purpose is providing support for our body. The muscular system provides movement for our body. The circulatory system transports nutrients. The nervous system relays electrical signals to our body. The respiratory system allows our body to breath. The digestive system breaks down food that we consume. The excretory system filters wastes out of our bodies. The endocrine system sends chemical systems through our body. The reproductive system allows us to create new life through the manufacture of cells. The lymphatic system helps our body fight off disease by destroying invading viruses.

The human body is made up of eleven major organ systems. These eleven systems are the skeletal, muscular, circulatory, nervous, respiratory, digestive, urinary, endocrine, reproductive, integumentary and lymphatic systems. The Skeletal systems main purpose is providing support for our body. The muscular system provides movement for our body. The circulatory system transports nutrients. The nervous system relays electrical signals to our body. The respiratory system allows our body to breath. The digestive system breaks down food that we consume. The excretory system filters wastes out of our bodies. The endocrine system sends chemical systems through our body. The reproductive system allows us to create new life through the manufacture of cells. The lymphatic system helps our body fight off disease by destroying invading viruses.

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