FIELD TEST HUNTING EQUIPMENT : FIELD TEST

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Field Test Hunting Equipment


field test hunting equipment
    field test
  • (Field testing) A 'pilot experiment, also called a pilot study', is a small scale preliminary study conducted before the main research in order to check the feasibility or to improve the design of the research. Pilot studies therefore may not be appropriate for case studies.
  • Test (something) in the environment in such a way
  • test something under the conditions under which it will actually be used; "The Army field tested the new tanks"
  • (Field-tested) The pilot of an instrument or research method in conditions equivalent to those that will be encountered in the research study.
    equipment
  • The process of supplying someone or something with such necessary items
  • Mental resources
  • A tool is a device that can be used to produce or achieve something, but that is not consumed in the process. Colloquially a tool can also be a procedure or process used for a specific purpose.
  • an instrumentality needed for an undertaking or to perform a service
  • The necessary items for a particular purpose
  • The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition; Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc.
    hunting
  • search: the activity of looking thoroughly in order to find something or someone
  • (hunt) Englishman and Pre-Raphaelite painter (1827-1910)
  • The activity of hunting wild animals or game, esp. for food or sport
  • hunt: the pursuit and killing or capture of wild animals regarded as a sport
  • A simple system of changes in which bells move through the order in a regular progression
field test hunting equipment - Carson Optical
Carson Optical The Raven Compact Binocular
Carson Optical The Raven Compact Binocular
The RV-826 Raven Binocular from Carson Optical is an 8x26mm roof prism Compact Binocular with a contemporary open-hinge design. These Compact Binoculars boast high quality BAK-4 prisms and fully multi-coated optics to ensure a crisp, bright image. The durable, waterproof and fogproof design makes it perfect for outdoor use in all conditions. The RV-826 Binoculars are compact and portable enough to bring with you to concerts, sporting events, bird watching, hiking or any other outdoor activity. Comes complete with a soft pouch, neck strap and lens cloth.

The Carson Optical RV-826 Raven, winner of the 2009 Outdoor Magazine "Killer Value" award, is an 8x26 roof prism compact binocular with innovative open-hinge design. The Raven boasts high-end BAK-4 prisms and fully multi-coated optics for a bright, crisp image. A durable, water- and fog-proof case holds up to years of outdoor use, and is compact enough to bring with you to a variety of events, from camping to concerts.
Specifications

8X magnification
BAK-4 prisms
Fully multi-coated lenses
26-millimeter objective lens
330-foot field of view at 1,000 yards
Measures 4.25 by 1.5 by 4.5 inches (W x H x D)
9.8-ounce weight
Includes carrying pouch, neck strap, and lens cloth
Warranty
This Carson Optical product includes the company's "No Fault, No Hassle" warranty against defects in materials and workmanship. Details included with your purchase.
About Carson Optical
Carson is a leading supplier of consumer optics products for major catalog companies, nationwide retailers, and direct to consumers. The company's product line covers categories from recreation, sports, hobby, education, and crafts with products ranging from high-end binoculars to low-cost magnifiers.

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Extremely Rare Micronesian Kingfishers Hatch at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
Extremely Rare Micronesian Kingfishers Hatch at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
In this photo: Female chick born July 25. The Smithsonian’s National Zoo cares for some of the rarest species on earth, including the Micronesian kingfisher (Todiramphus c. cinnamominus), a bird that has been extinct in the wild for more than 20 years. The Zoo’s Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., is celebrating the recent hatching of two chicks, a female and male, on July 25 and Aug. 20, respectively. A third chick hatched at the Zoo’s Bird House on Sept. 3, but it died Sept. 5 of unknown causes. This boost brings the total population of Micronesian kingfishers to 131 birds. The National Zoo cares for about eight percent of the population—eight birds live at SCBI- Front Royal and two live at the Bird House. This species is extremely difficult to breed due to incompatibility between males and females and the inability of some parents to successfully raise their own chicks. The chick that hatched at the Bird House was incubated and raised by its parents. Keepers weighed it each day to make sure it did not need supplemental feeding. A final pathology report will provide more information about the cause of its death. “We are encouraged that this pair showed an interest in one another and delighted that they produced fertile eggs,” said Warren Lynch, bird unit manager at SCBI. “We are hand-rearing the chicks, which involves feeding them at two-hour intervals, seven to eight times per day. Should the adults produce fertile eggs again, we will likely let them try to raise the chicks themselves while closely monitoring their parenting skills.” Micronesian kingfishers flourished in Guam’s limestone forests and coconut plantations until the arrival of the brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis), an invasive species that stowed away in military equipment shipped from New Guinea after World War II. Because these reptiles had no natural predators on Guam, their numbers grew and they spread across the island quickly. Within three decades, they hunted Micronesian kingfishers and eight other bird species to the brink of extinction. In 1984, Guam’s Department of Aquatic and Wildlife Resources captured the country’s remaining 29 Micronesian kingfishers and sent them to zoological institutions around the globe—including the National Zoo—as a hedge against extinction. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums created a Species Survival Plan (SSP) for the birds. The SSP pairs males and females in order to maintain a genetically diverse and self-sustaining population. To date, 16 chicks have hatched at SCBI, and each provides scientists with the opportunity to learn about the growth, reproduction, health and behavior of the species. Five of SCBI’s kingfishers have gone to other zoos to breed. “We’re proud that SCBI has been a part of the Micronesian kingfisher recovery from the start, and we hope this pair continues to produce healthy offspring and contribute to its species’ survival,” said Chris Crowe, bird keeper at SCBI. “Both chicks are thriving. The female flies short distances and is increasingly confident and vocal, and the male is beginning to grow feathers and has a healthy appetite for crickets, mice and small lizards.” As the captive population increases, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Guam’s Department of Aquatic and Wildlife Resources continue to look for suitable release sites in Guam. The availability of release sites continues to shrink, however, due to deforestation and human expansion. Controlling the brown snake population remains a significant challenge as well, though researchers have made progress in developing a variety of barriers, traps and toxicants. Scientists are hopeful that initiatives for snake control and forest protection signify that the reintroduction of the Micronesian kingfisher may soon become feasible. Additionally, field studies of a different subspecies of wild kingfishers are underway on Pohnpei, another Micronesian island, to secure essential biological information on wild populations and to test various reintroduction techniques for use on Guam. Visitors to the Smithsonian’s National Zoo can see these critically endangered birds on exhibit in the Bird House. Micronesian kingfishers are about 6 inches tall and have wide, dorsoventrally-flattened bills. Both sexes have a plume of blue-green feathers on their wings and brown-orange feathers on their heads. Males can be easily identified by their brown-orange breasts and females by their white breasts. The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute plays a key role in the Smithsonian Institution’s global efforts to understand and conserve species and train future generations of conservationists. Headquartered in Front Royal, Va., SCBI facilitates and promotes research programs based at Front Royal, the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. and at field research stations and training sites worldwide. # # # Photo Credit: Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian’s National Zoo
Extremely Rare Micronesian Kingfishers Hatch at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
Extremely Rare Micronesian Kingfishers Hatch at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
In this photo: Male chick born Aug. 20. The Smithsonian’s National Zoo cares for some of the rarest species on earth, including the Micronesian kingfisher (Todiramphus c. cinnamominus), a bird that has been extinct in the wild for more than 20 years. The Zoo’s Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., is celebrating the recent hatching of two chicks, a female and male, on July 25 and Aug. 20, respectively. A third chick hatched at the Zoo’s Bird House on Sept. 3, but it died Sept. 5 of unknown causes. This boost brings the total population of Micronesian kingfishers to 131 birds. The National Zoo cares for about eight percent of the population—eight birds live at SCBI- Front Royal and two live at the Bird House. This species is extremely difficult to breed due to incompatibility between males and females and the inability of some parents to successfully raise their own chicks. The chick that hatched at the Bird House was incubated and raised by its parents. Keepers weighed it each day to make sure it did not need supplemental feeding. A final pathology report will provide more information about the cause of its death. “We are encouraged that this pair showed an interest in one another and delighted that they produced fertile eggs,” said Warren Lynch, bird unit manager at SCBI. “We are hand-rearing the chicks, which involves feeding them at two-hour intervals, seven to eight times per day. Should the adults produce fertile eggs again, we will likely let them try to raise the chicks themselves while closely monitoring their parenting skills.” Micronesian kingfishers flourished in Guam’s limestone forests and coconut plantations until the arrival of the brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis), an invasive species that stowed away in military equipment shipped from New Guinea after World War II. Because these reptiles had no natural predators on Guam, their numbers grew and they spread across the island quickly. Within three decades, they hunted Micronesian kingfishers and eight other bird species to the brink of extinction. In 1984, Guam’s Department of Aquatic and Wildlife Resources captured the country’s remaining 29 Micronesian kingfishers and sent them to zoological institutions around the globe—including the National Zoo—as a hedge against extinction. The Association of Zoos and Aquariums created a Species Survival Plan (SSP) for the birds. The SSP pairs males and females in order to maintain a genetically diverse and self-sustaining population. To date, 16 chicks have hatched at SCBI, and each provides scientists with the opportunity to learn about the growth, reproduction, health and behavior of the species. Five of SCBI’s kingfishers have gone to other zoos to breed. “We’re proud that SCBI has been a part of the Micronesian kingfisher recovery from the start, and we hope this pair continues to produce healthy offspring and contribute to its species’ survival,” said Chris Crowe, bird keeper at SCBI. “Both chicks are thriving. The female flies short distances and is increasingly confident and vocal, and the male is beginning to grow feathers and has a healthy appetite for crickets, mice and small lizards.” As the captive population increases, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Guam’s Department of Aquatic and Wildlife Resources continue to look for suitable release sites in Guam. The availability of release sites continues to shrink, however, due to deforestation and human expansion. Controlling the brown snake population remains a significant challenge as well, though researchers have made progress in developing a variety of barriers, traps and toxicants. Scientists are hopeful that initiatives for snake control and forest protection signify that the reintroduction of the Micronesian kingfisher may soon become feasible. Additionally, field studies of a different subspecies of wild kingfishers are underway on Pohnpei, another Micronesian island, to secure essential biological information on wild populations and to test various reintroduction techniques for use on Guam. Visitors to the Smithsonian’s National Zoo can see these critically endangered birds on exhibit in the Bird House. Micronesian kingfishers are about 6 inches tall and have wide, dorsoventrally-flattened bills. Both sexes have a plume of blue-green feathers on their wings and brown-orange feathers on their heads. Males can be easily identified by their brown-orange breasts and females by their white breasts. The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute plays a key role in the Smithsonian Institution’s global efforts to understand and conserve species and train future generations of conservationists. Headquartered in Front Royal, Va., SCBI facilitates and promotes research programs based at Front Royal, the National Zoo in Washington, D.C. and at field research stations and training sites worldwide. # # # Photo Credit: Mehgan Murphy, Smithsonian’s National Zoo

field test hunting equipment
field test hunting equipment
Cuddeback CuddeView X2 Picture Viewer
CuddeView X2 is a picture viewer/ media transfer device that allows you to view pictures from your game camera, as well as transfer them from the SD card on your camera to the CuddeView X2 device. Viewers that are built-in to the camera seem handy until you have to use them. You are constantly fighting glare and the camera in order to get a good look at the images. The new CuddeView X2 puts you in control You take it with you from camera to camera. You can view images when and where it works for you, without fighting glare. CuddeView X2 lets you view images, zoom, pan, delete, see date/time, and transfer images to a second SD card. CuddeView X2 lets you manage your scouting, leaving you more time to hunt. We took the viewer out of the camera and put in into your hands!!

The CuddeView X2 handheld image viewer takes the viewer out of the camera, and puts it into your hands offering you greater control of your scouting camera images. Designed to make using your scouting cameras faster and easier so that you have more time to hunt, you can take the CuddeView X2 with you from camera to camera for onsite image management or quickly upload and save the images for later viewing. The CuddeView X2 allows you view images, zoom, pan, delete (some or all images), and see the dates/times of the images from the field without dealing with the glare typical of camera viewing windows. Thanks to its two SD card slots it is easy to upload and transfer images from each camera onto a single SD card for faster camera management. Working with most scouting cameras that use SD cards, the CuddeView X2 also allows you to view images from your TV with an included TV connection cable (RCA video-in port required on TV) or on your computer with an included USB cable (USB port and Windows XP/Vista operating system required). Whichever way you use it, the CuddeView X2 makes managing your scouting faster and more effective, leaving you more time to hunt.


The CuddeView X2 takes the viewer out of the camera and puts it into your hands for easier viewing in the field and at home.
View Images in the Field:
CuddeView X2 allows you to check out the images on your scouting cameras right in the field--simply pull the SD card, insert it into the CuddeView X2 and quickly scroll through the images at the push of a button. You can also ZOOM and PAN around the image for a better look and/or copy or delete the images with the push of a button.
More Efficient Rotation Method for Checking Cameras:
With a destination card in your in your CuddeView X2 and a blank SD card, you can pull the used SD card from your camera and replace it with the blank SD card. Transfer the images from this used SD card to the destination card in your CuddeView X2 as you move to the next camera and delete the images from the used SD card. This card now replaces the card in camera #2. Repeat this process until you've checked all cameras and you're left with 1 destination card carrying all of your images.
View Images Easily on Your TV or Computer:
TV: CuddeView X2 comes with a TV cable so you can see your scouting camera images larger-than-life on your TV (requires RCA video-in port).
Computer: CuddeView X2 serves as a PC or laptop card reader so you can download images to your computer for viewing or storage (cable included; requires USB port and Windows XP/Vista operating system).
What's in the Box?
CuddeView X2, USB cable, TV input cable

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