TRUCK REFRIGERATION SYSTEM. TRUCK REFRIGERATION

Truck refrigeration system. Dirty refrigerator pictures.

Truck Refrigeration System


truck refrigeration system
    refrigeration system
  • a cooling system for chilling or freezing (usually for preservative purposes)
  • uses HFC-134A refrigerant and has a self-contained 115 volt, 60 hertz, single phase hermetically sealed condensing unit with adjustable cold pan pressure control.
    truck
  • convey (goods etc.) by truck; "truck fresh vegetables across the mountains"
  • hand truck: a handcart that has a frame with two low wheels and a ledge at the bottom and handles at the top; used to move crates or other heavy objects
  • an automotive vehicle suitable for hauling
  • Barter or exchange
truck refrigeration system - Understanding Boat
Understanding Boat Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Systems
Understanding Boat Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Systems
From John C. Payne, one of the foremost international authorities on marine electrical systems and electronics, comes a new title in his successful series of easy to understand yet thorough treatments of technical issues facing every boat owner, whether sail of power. Each volume is concise, compact, and fully illustrated for easy reference. UNDERSTANDING BOAT REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS covers: Refrigeration systems, Eutetic Refrigeration systems, compressors and motors, auxiliary refrigeration systems, hermetic compressors. Also, air conditioning systems, self-contained and remote condensing systems, electrical power requirements, maintenance, and troubleshooting.

86% (5)
835 Washington Street
835 Washington Street
Meatpacking District, Manhattan History This market building was erected in 1926-27 for William Wallace Wotherspoon, son of Gen. William Wallace Wotherspoon (185 1-1921). The firm of Wotherspoon Brothers' Phoenix Plaster Mills, 426-428 West 13" Street, was a fixture on the block from at least after the Civil War through the 1880s. William Wotherspoon, Sr., entered the army in 1873, rose to become a Major-General, Chief of the General Staff of the Army, and president of the Army War College (1907-09). He also served as N.Y .S. Commissioner of Public Works in the 19 10s. No. 835 Washington Street has had a wide variety of tenants over the years, including poultry associations, fruit, provision, and meat dealers, trucking firms, telegraph companies, and a restaurant. Among the longer-tern tenants were the Postal Telegraph Cable Co., Archie Restaurant, [Morris] Burg Trucking Corp., Western Union Telegraph Co., Maurice Ettlinger, and S&S Heyman, Ltd. During the 1970s, several gay clubs (Cycle, Den, Zodiac, O.K. Corral) were located here, followed by the Mineshaft. This Art Deco style building, which is largely intact, contributes to the historically-mixed architectural character and varied uses - including market-related and other functions - of the Gansevoort Market Historic District. It was constructed during one of the major phases of development in the area, when market-related structures were being built in the district. Commercial Tenants Augusta Vogell Vogel Produce Co., fruit (1929-33); Columbus Paclung Co., provisions (1929); N.Y. Live Poultry Commission Merchants Assn. (1929-36); N.Y. Poultry Exchange (1929-36); Postal Telegraph Cable Co. (1929-38); Pan American Produce Dealers, Inc. (1929-33); William M. Duncan, refrigeration supplies (1929); Vincent Sequino, fruit (1929); J. Frank, produce (1929-33); Avon Commission Co. (1933); [Michael A.] Lombino Banana Co. (1933-36); Landini & Pittorino, fruit (1936); Archie Restaurant (1937-59); [Morris] Burg Trucking Corp. (1938-59); M.M. Mades Co., meat (1938-42); Western Union Telegraph Co. (1938-59); Maurice Ettlinger, casings (1942-59); S&S Heyman Ltd., provisions (1942-75); F&G Carloading Co. (1946); George Gold, meat (1946); Food Fair Stores, Inc. (1950); Haugh & de Vries Truclung, Inc. (1950-55); Jim & Pat Trucking (1950); Nap's Transportation Co. (1950-59); Paul Emanuele Trucking Co. (1955); Marine Carpenters, Local 901 (1955); Atlas Brokers Food Products (1959); D'Ottavio Trucking Co. (1959); A1 Moss, meat (1965); C&H Provision Co.1 Abraham I. Hasner & Co., meat (1965); Cycle, Den, Zodiac, O.K. Corral, gay clubs (1970-75); Mineshaft, gay club (1976-85) ----About the district---- The Gansevoort Market Historic District - consisting of 104 buildings - is distinctive for its architectural character which reflects the area's long history of continuous, varied use as a place of dwelling, industry, and commerce, particularly as a marketplace, and its urban layout. The buildings, most dating from the 1840s through the 1940s, represent four major phases of development, and include both purpose-built structures, designed in then-fashionable styles, and those later adapted for market use. The architecture of the district tells the story of an important era in New York City's history when it became the financial center of the country and when its markets were expanding to serve the metropolitan region and beyond. Visual cohesion is provided to the streetscapes by the predominance of brick as a facade material; the one- to six-story scale; the presence of buildings designed by the same architects, a number of them prominent, including specialists in market-related structures; the existence of metal canopies originally installed for market purposes; and the Belgian block paving still visible on most streets. The street layout is shaped by the transition between the irregular pattern of northwestern Greenwich Village (as far north as Gansevoort Street) and the grid of the 1811 Commissioner's Plan. Unusually large and open intersections contribute to the area's unique quality, particularly where Ninth Avenue meets West 14'~S treet and Gansevoort Street (which was widened in l887), and provide sweeping vistas that showcase the unusual building typology and mixed-use quality of the district. Aside from Tribeca, the Gansevoort Market Historic District is the only remaining marketplace district that served the once-flourishing Hudson River commercial waterfront. The earliest buildings in the historic district date from the period between 1840 and 1854, most built as rowhouses and town houses, several of which soon became very early working-class tenements (all eventually had stores on the ground floor). The area's early mixed use, however, is evident in the rare surviving early factory building (c. 1849-60), on a flatiron-shaped lot, for Col. Silas C. Herring, a nationally significant manufacturer of safes and locks, a
9-19 Ninth Avenue (AKA 7-11 Little West 12th Street)
9-19 Ninth Avenue (AKA 7-11 Little West 12th Street)
Meatpacking District, Manhattan History From 1878, when the John Jacob Astor I Estate was partitioned, this property passed to William Astor, then to John Jacob Astor IV, and finally to William Vincent Astor, who held it until 1943. This building has had a complex construction history. Its present form resulted from an alteration in 1921-22 (Alt. 2409-1921) when four two- and three-story stables and wagon storage buildings were unified at two stories, fortified with interior steel girders, and converted to a garage (on both stories) with stores. It appears that the previous buildings were: a two-story former storeldwelling (11 Little West 12' Street) altered in 1881 (Alt. 972-1881, A.B. Van Heusen, builder); a two-story stables building (17 Ninth Avenue) rebuilt in 1889 (Alt. 597-1 889, Hugh Getty, mason); a one-story market and stables building (9 Ninth Avenue) rebuilt and raised to two stories in 1905 (Alt. 1398-1905, George M. McCabe, architect), after being condemned by the Board of Health; and a three-story stables building (19 Ninth Avenue) constructed in 1908 (NB 647-1906, George M. McCabe, architect). Commercial tenants both before and after the 1920s alteration were mostly in the fruit and produce business, including several long-term ones: Domenico Calarco, Frank Cliento & Co., Angelo Gionfrida, West Side Water Cress Co., and C. Starace & Bro. (later C. Starace & Bros., Inc. and J.J. Starace, Inc.). Domenico Calarco purchased the building from Astor in 1943 and held it until 1962. It operated as the Radio Garage and Avenue Garage until the 1940s, then as the Gansevoort Garage (Leo and Frank Calarco) and Olympia Garage. This building was the result of a 1921-22 alteration during one of the major phases of development in the area, when transportation and market-related buildings were being constructed or significantly adapted in the district. Ownership History (formerly lots 45 and 49; previously lots 45-49) 1878 William Astorl John Jacob Astor IV/ William Vincent Astor 1943 Domenico Calarco 1962 19-9th Avenue Corp. 1985 William Gottlieb 1998 9 Ninth Avenue LLC Commercial Tenants Partlin & Co., fruit (1889); Christian Handelmann, produce (1889); Frank T. Scheidel, produce (1889-97); Ephraim Booth, produce (1889); Michael Tremberger, Jr., fruitlproduce (1890); F.J. Larkin & Bro., fruit (1902-06); William Hirsch, produce (1902); Domenico Calarco, fruit (1906-70); Frank Cliento & Co., fruit (1906-29); Ernest Celendine, produce (1906); William Berkowitz, produce (1906); Samuel Asciutto, produce (1906); Joseph Acanford, produce (1906); Louis Tausend, produce (1906-12); White's Express Co. (1909-12); Angelo Gionfrida, fruit (1910-55); Joseph Vogel, produce (19 12); Atlantic Express Co. (1913); C[harles]. Perceval, Inc., provisions (192 1-22); Radio Garage, Inc. (1921-23); Avenue Garage, Inc. (1926-46); Coltri-Ceaser, auto reps. (1929-33); Gigoux Bros., food products (1929); Regular Fruit & Produce Co. (1929); Adler's Express Co.1 Market Hardware Co. (1929-33); Radio Coffee Pot (1929-33); West Side Water Cress Co. (1929- 59); Arthur H. & L. Nadel, produce (1929); C. Starace & Bro.1 C. Starace & Bros., Inc.1 J.J. Starace, Inc., fruit (1933-80); Chisholm Motor Service (1933); Excellent Fruit & Produce Distributors, Inc. (1933); UnitedHotel Supply, Inc. (1933); Sun Restaurant (1936-42); Joseph Buonocore, fruit (1936- 38); Salvatore Buonocore, produce (1946); Gansevoort Garage, Inc. (Leo and Frank Calarco)/ Olympia Garage, Inc. (1949-93); A. Stalano, produce (1950); J&D Auto Service1 B&C Auto & Truck Maintenance (1955-59); A&J Tantillo, produce (1959-65); Far-Best Transportation Co. (1959- 65); Brothers TruckRental Co. (1970-86); Shiff Produce, Inc. (1975-80); AlliedFanns (1980); Farm Crest Markets, Inc. (1980); Pastis, restaurant (1999-2003) ----About the district---- The Gansevoort Market Historic District - consisting of 104 buildings - is distinctive for its architectural character which reflects the area's long history of continuous, varied use as a place of dwelling, industry, and commerce, particularly as a marketplace, and its urban layout. The buildings, most dating from the 1840s through the 1940s, represent four major phases of development, and include both purpose-built structures, designed in then-fashionable styles, and those later adapted for market use. The architecture of the district tells the story of an important era in New York City's history when it became the financial center of the country and when its markets were expanding to serve the metropolitan region and beyond. Visual cohesion is provided to the streetscapes by the predominance of brick as a facade material; the one- to six-story scale; the presence of buildings designed by the same architects, a number of them prominent, including specialists in market-related structures; the existence of metal canopies originally installed for market purposes; and the Bel

truck refrigeration system
truck refrigeration system
Refrigeration Principles, Practices, and Performance
Designed to provide a basic, straightforward overview of the concepts and principles of HVAC and refrigeration, this book is ideal for readers with a limited amount of experience in the field. Refrigeration Principles, Practices, and Performance begins with an introduction to the basics of refrigeration and HVAC, and then quickly progresses into specific equipment components, eliminating overly technical and lengthy information that is found in many traditional industry books. The focus on presenting the essentials with a simple, easy-to-understand approach makes this book valuable for any reader seeking to master and apply basic refrigeration and HVAC principles.

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