REALISTIC ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS - REALISTIC ARTIFICIAL

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Realistic Artificial Flowers


realistic artificial flowers
    artificial flowers
  • (artificial flower) a handmade imitation of a blossom
  • Artificial flowers and imitations of natural flowers are sometimes made for scientific purposes (the collection of glass flowers at Harvard University, for example, which illustrates the flora of the United States), but more often as articles for commercial or residential decoration.
    realistic
  • Having or showing a sensible and practical idea of what can be achieved or expected
  • (realism) the attribute of accepting the facts of life and favoring practicality and literal truth
  • Representing familiar things in a way that is accurate or true to life
  • of or relating to the philosophical doctrine of realism; "a realistic system of thought"
  • aware or expressing awareness of things as they really are; "a realistic description"; "a realistic view of the possibilities"; "a realistic appraisal of our chances"; "the actors tried to create a realistic portrayal of the Africans"
realistic artificial flowers - Laura Ashley
Laura Ashley Realistic Areca Palm Tree in Decorative Planter, 7-Feet Tall
Laura Ashley Realistic Areca Palm Tree in Decorative Planter, 7-Feet Tall
The Laura Ashley brand is known for quality and distinctive design, the mark of timeless beauty and relaxed living – and this life-like plant fulfills those expectations. Beautiful 7-foot tall Areca Palm Tree in a decorative container will instantly liven up your home or office decor - with no maintenance. Plants add a feeling of life to a room, making it warmer and more welcoming; artificial plants let you decorate without concern for water damage, trimming, or soil. This high-quality tree is brought to you by Vintage Home: setting the standard in permanent botanicals, Vintage Home products bring you a richer and more realistic plant.

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The Seokguram Grotto (part of the Bulguksa temple complex) South korea - ???
The Seokguram Grotto (part of the Bulguksa temple complex) South korea - ???
The Seokguram Grotto is a hermitage and part of the Bulguksa temple complex. It lies four kilometers east of the temple on Mt. Tohamsan, in Gyeongju, South Korea. The grotto overlooks the Sea of Japan (East Sea) and rests 750 meters above sea level. In 1962, it was designated the 24th national treasure of Korea. In 1995, Seokguram was added to the UNESCO World Heritage List together with the Bulguksa Temple. It exemplifies some of the best Buddhist sculptures in the world. [1] It is said to have been built by Gim Daeseong and originally called Seokbulsa (???, Stone Buddha Temple). Construction began in 742 when Gim Daeseong resigned his position in the king's court or in 751, the 10th year of the reign of King Gyeongdeok of Silla. This time period was the cultural peak of Unified Silla. The grotto was completed by the Silla court in 774, shortly after Gim's death. An old legend stated that Gim was reincarnated for his filial acts in his previous life. The legend relates that the Bulguksa Temple was dedicated to Gim’s parents in his present life while the Seokguram Grotto was dedicated to Gim's parents from a previous life. It is now one of the best known cultural destinations in South Korea. A viewing of the sunrise over the sea is especially popular. Architecture India began a tradition of carving the image of Buddha in stone, holy images, and stupas into the cliff walls and natural caves. This practice was transferred to China and then Korea. The geology of the Korean Peninsula, which contains an abundance of hard granite, is not conducive to carving stone images into cliff walls. Seokguram is an artificial grotto made from granite and is unique in design. The small size of the grotto indicates that it was probably used exclusively by the Silla royalty. The grotto is symbolic of a spiritual journey into Nirvana. Pilgrims were to start at Bulguksa or at the foot Mt. Tohamsan, a holy mountain to the Silla. There was a fountain at the entrance of the shrine where pilgrims could refresh themselves. Inside the grotto, the antechamber and corridor represented the earth while the rotunda represented heaven. The basic layout of the grotto includes an arched entrance which leads into a rectangular antechamber and then a narrow corridor, which is lined with bas-reliefs, and then finally leads into the main rotunda. The centerpiece of the granite sanctuary is a Buddha statue seated in the main chamber. The identity of the Buddha is still debated. The Buddha is seated on a lotus throne with legs crossed. The Buddha has a serene expression of meditation. The Buddha is surrounded by fifteen panels of bodhisattvas, arhats and ancient Indian gods in the rotunda and is accompanied by ten statues in niches along the rotunda wall. The main hall of Seokguram houses a Bojon statue Bodhisattva and his disciples. Forty different figures representing Buddhist principles and teachings are in the grotto. The grotto was built around these statues in order to protect them from weathering. The ceiling of the Seokguram grotto is decorated with half moons, the top is decorated with a lotus flower. Silla architects used symmetry and apparently employed the concept of the golden rectangle. The grotto is shaped by hundreds of different granite stones. There was no mortar used and the structure was held together by stone rivets. The construction of the grotto also utilized natural ventilation. The dome of the rotunda is 6.84 meters to 6.58 meters in diameter. Sculpture within the grotto The main Buddha is a highly regarded piece of Buddhist art. It is 3.5 meters in height and sits on a 1.34 meter tall lotus pedestal. The Buddha is realistic in form and probably represents the Seokgamoni Buddha, the historic Buddha at the moment of enlightenment. The position of the Buddha's hands symbolizes witnessing the enlightenment. The Buddha has an usnisa, a symbol of the wisdom of the Buddha. The drapery on the Buddha, such as the fan-shaped folds at the crossed-legs of the Buddha, exemplifies Korean interpretations of Indian prototypes. Unlike other Buddhas that have a halo attached to the back of the head, the Buddha at Seokguram creates the illusion of a halo by placing a granite roundel carved with lotus petals at the back wall of the rotunda. The pedestal is made of three parts; the top and bottom are carved with lotus petals while the central shaft consists of eight pillars. Accompanying the main Buddha, in relief, are three bodhisattvas, ten disciples, and two Hindu gods along the wall of the rotunda. Ten statues of bodhisattvas, saints, and the faithful are located in niches above the bas-reliefs. The ten disciples were disciples of Seokgamoni and are lined five on each side of the Avalokitesvara. Their features suggest a Greek influence. The two bodhisattvas are of Manjusri and Samantabhadra. The two Hindu gods are Brahma and Indra. The Four Heavenly Kings guard the corridor. There are also images of Vajrapanis, which are guardia
Mother and Child Cabinet Card - 1910
Mother and Child Cabinet Card - 1910
If you saw this photograph with the words "Cabinet Portrait" printed in the lower righthand corner of the card, you might logically assume that it was made in the United States, Great Britain or some other Engish-speaking part of the world. But you would be wrong. This photograph was probably taken in Bulgaria. There is a handwritten, dated inscription written in what I believe to be Bulgarian on the back of the card. This is not the first Bulgarian photograph on card stock printed or embellished with an English inscription that I have seen. I have also seen some printed with French inscriptions. In this lovely portrait, a pretty young mother poses holding her beautiful baby in an elaborate garden. The picture might have been actually taken outdoors, but then again it might have been taken in a studio where a talented photographer assembled the background by arranging realistic artificial plants and flowers in front of a skillfully painted backdrop. The proud young mother wears a light-colored, wonderfully detailed dress, the skirt of which is contructed with a wide panel in front embellished with many small covered buttons and large false button holes, giving the illusion that the panel is fastened on with the buttons. The elaborate bodice which is constructed with Renaissance-style slashed puffed sleeves is adorned with lace and a small running strand of dark embroidery with six dark buttons centered down low on the front. The pattern of the eyelet lace on her high collar has a cameo-shaped decorative design centered on the front of it. Light-colored elbow-lengh lace mitts and a large bow at the back of her beautifully arranged hair complete her ensemble. The darling baby is dressed in what might be a christening gown of fine white muslin. The edge of the gown is decorated with several rows of tucks and a border of beautiful lace. The baby's cap is adorned with many, many loopings of satin ribbon, and several strands of the baby's dark hair peek out from its edge. The handwritten inscription on the back of the photograph is written in what I believe to be Bulgarian, and perhaps that would give a clue as to the identities of the mother and child as well as perhaps the location of where the picture was made. "9-IX-1910" (September 9, 1910) is the date given. ----------------------------------- UPDATE: Flickr friend josephnovak33 has provided a translation for the inscription: "Yes, It?s a Bulgarian inscription," he writes. "I can decipher only the first and the last row: Little Marguerite 7 months old....... Town of Teteven 9th of September 1910." Thanks a million, Josef!

realistic artificial flowers
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