FLOWERS BY INTERNET - BY INTERNET

Flowers By Internet - The Flower Of Friendship.

Flowers By Internet


flowers by internet
    internet
  • A global computer network providing a variety of information and communication facilities, consisting of interconnected networks using standardized communication protocols
  • a computer network consisting of a worldwide network of computer networks that use the TCP/IP network protocols to facilitate data transmission and exchange
  • The Internet is a global system of interconnected computer networks that use the standard Internet Protocol Suite (TCP/IP) to serve billions of users worldwide.
  • (The Internets) "Internets" is a Bushism-turned-catchphrase used humorously to portray the speaker as ignorant about the Internet or about technology in general, or as having a provincial or folksy attitude toward technology. Former United States President George W.
    flowers
  • Induce (a plant) to produce flowers
  • Be in or reach an optimum stage of development; develop fully and richly
  • (flower) reproductive organ of angiosperm plants especially one having showy or colorful parts
  • (of a plant) Produce flowers; bloom
  • (flower) bloom: produce or yield flowers; "The cherry tree bloomed"
  • (flower) a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
flowers by internet - Underdog Advertising®:
Underdog Advertising®: Proven Principles to Compete and Win Against the Giants in Any Industry
Underdog Advertising®: Proven Principles to Compete and Win Against the Giants in Any Industry
‘Underdog Advertising’® is written for the small-to-mid size business owner/operator who cannot afford to hire an advertising agency. The book presents principles and processes that have proven successful for advertisers who must compete with larger companies in their industries for sales, awareness and market share. ‘Underdog Advertising’ has four primary components and just as David toppled Goliath with a well-aimed rock, the disciplines introduced in this book have consistently helped "budget underdogs" hit the mark and become the real winners. It may be just the weapon you need. First, under the heading ‘Underdog Advertising Principles,’ here are ten principles of ‘Underdog Advertising’ that consistently generate higher returns on advertising. These include: Principle #1 – Think Outside The Box; Principle #2 – Take Risks; Principle #3 – Strategy Before Execution; Principle #4 – Be Contrary; Principle #5 – Select Your Battlefield; Principle #6 – Focus! Focus! Focus!; Principle #7 – Be Consistent; Principle #8 – Demonstrate Value; Principle #9 – Speed & Surprise; Principle #10 – Have Patience. Next, under the heading ‘Big Dog Branding’ the book will cover a fast-track ‘Big Dog Brand ‘development process that helps create branding strategies that differentiate a brand from its competitors in a meaningful and compelling way. ‘Junkyard Dog Executions’ is an approach to marketing tactics that deliver results beyond expectation and for those wanting even more, the ‘Underdog Advertising Workbook, a how-to supplement that walks the reader step-by-step through the ten Underdog Advertising principles and helps apply them to any business situation, is made available by the author.

‘Underdog Advertising’® is written for the small-to-mid size business owner/operator who cannot afford to hire an advertising agency. The book presents principles and processes that have proven successful for advertisers who must compete with larger companies in their industries for sales, awareness and market share. ‘Underdog Advertising’ has four primary components and just as David toppled Goliath with a well-aimed rock, the disciplines introduced in this book have consistently helped "budget underdogs" hit the mark and become the real winners. It may be just the weapon you need. First, under the heading ‘Underdog Advertising Principles,’ here are ten principles of ‘Underdog Advertising’ that consistently generate higher returns on advertising. These include: Principle #1 – Think Outside The Box; Principle #2 – Take Risks; Principle #3 – Strategy Before Execution; Principle #4 – Be Contrary; Principle #5 – Select Your Battlefield; Principle #6 – Focus! Focus! Focus!; Principle #7 – Be Consistent; Principle #8 – Demonstrate Value; Principle #9 – Speed & Surprise; Principle #10 – Have Patience. Next, under the heading ‘Big Dog Branding’ the book will cover a fast-track ‘Big Dog Brand ‘development process that helps create branding strategies that differentiate a brand from its competitors in a meaningful and compelling way. ‘Junkyard Dog Executions’ is an approach to marketing tactics that deliver results beyond expectation and for those wanting even more, the ‘Underdog Advertising Workbook, a how-to supplement that walks the reader step-by-step through the ten Underdog Advertising principles and helps apply them to any business situation, is made available by the author.

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Pomelo Flowers on My Fruit Tree Today
Pomelo Flowers on My Fruit Tree Today
I took these flowers today of my fruit trees that are flowering. They are tropical fruits so the names may not be familiar to some people. The THIRD is the Pomelo. The pomelo belongs to the citrus family and is a bit like a thick skinned grapefruit. It is much bigger and more tropical. Taken very late in the day so I think I used a flash. My pomelo is red fleshed but it often very dry for some reason. Here are two accounts from the Internet, one small and the other long. The pomelo, (Citrus maxima or Citrus grandis), is a citrus fruit native to South East Asia. It is usually pale green to yellow when ripe, with sweet white (or, more rarely, pink or red) flesh and very thick spongy rind. It is the largest citrus fruit, 15-25 cm in diameter,[1] and usually weighing 1-2 kg. Other names for pomelo include pummelo, pommelo, Chinese grapefruit, jabong, lusho fruit, pompelmous,[2] and shaddock.[3] Pomelos are also referred to as chakotara in Pakistan and Afghanistan. = = = = = = = = = = Pomelo (Citrus grandis), the largest of citrus fruits, belongs to the family Rutaceae. It is also known as Shaddock. Pomelo derives its name from a word of unknown origin 'pampelmoose'. The tasty fruit is popular locally for its taste and features significantly in the Chinese new year celebrations. Origins and distribution Pomelo, believed to be an ancestor of the grapefruit, is native to the Southeast Asian and the Indo-China regions. The exact place of origin is unknown. It is most likely from Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia where it is found in the wild. The Chinese cultivated it as a crop for thousands of years as it features significantly in the Chinese new year festivities. Variations of pomelo, either bred through selection and propagation or found as natural hybrids, have been cultivated in different places. In 1884, a variety of pomelo, limau bali, was imported into Malaya from Indonesia by Sir Hugh Low and it was grown in Penang and Perak. A peculiar variety found in the Dutch East Indies called the limau wangkang by Malays, consists of a small fruit enclosed inside a larger fruit. Some types of pomelo have no rind. In Southeast Asia, it is grown as a cultivable crop in Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia. In Malaysia pomelo is widely grown in the state of Perak, Kedah, Melaka, Kelantan and Johor. It is also grown commercially in parts of the USA, Israel, China and Japan and is found growing non-commercially in India, Jamaica and the Middle East. Pomelo, known to be the largest of all citrus fruits, can grow as large as a foot in diameter and weigh up to 25 pounds. Popular variations of the fruit are the P051 and P052 where the fruit is sweet and delicious. Description The pomelo tree is a large bushy tree with an irregular crown growing to around 5 to 15 m in height. The thorny tree has many branches and it produces fruits all year round. Its bark is brownish yellow and thick. The leaves are simple and grow to about 2 to 12 cm wide. Oil glands are present on them as small dots and this gives the dark green leaves a shiny appearance. When crushed, they give off a strong smell. The flowers are yellowish white or plain white, fragrant, solitary and grow to around 2.5 cm wide. The pomelo fruit is the largest of all citrus fruits. Its outer skin is rough and easy to peel. It is light green to yellow and dotted with oil glands. The fruit is either round or oblong with a white thick spongy pith that encloses the edible portion of the fruit. Each fruit consists of 9 to14 segments covered with paper-thin skin. The flesh of the fruit is white, light yellow, pink or rose-red, juicy with a sweet sour or spicy sweet taste. Some fruits leave a bitter after taste in the mouth. The seeds are few in number, yellowish white and large. Usage and potential Food The pomelo fruit is eaten fresh or processed into juice. The rind is candied or used in jams. Malays boil the rind in a syrup. For cooking purposes, it is sometimes used in place of grapefruit. Medicine The Chinese eat the sweet and sour fruit is eaten to fortify the lungs and the spleen. They make various medicaments from the seeds, flowers, mature peel, and slices of young fruit by usually drying them up. It is used in treating cough, swellings, vomiting, indigestion, in removing phlegm and resolving alcohol toxins and hangover. The Malays eat the fruit to treat abdominal pains, oedema and phlegm. The leaves are boiled into a lotion and applied on swellings and ulcers. Pomelo fruit is an excellent source of Vitamin C. Other uses The Chinese boil pomelo skin and leaves for a ritual bath that cleanses a person and repels evil. It is also used by Malays in exorcism to remove evil spirits. Oil can be extracted from the leaves, peel or seeds of some pomelo races. Oil from the seeds is used in lighting up opium pipes in Indo-China. Flowers are used to extract perfume. Timber from pomelo trees are used in making tool-handles and being moderately heavy and hard, i
Flowers on the sill
Flowers on the sill
Flowers on a window sill in the old town, Hoi An. H?i An is a city on the coast of the South China Sea in the South Central Coast of Vietnam. It is located in Qu?ng Nam province and is home to approximately 120,000 inhabitants. In 1999, the old town was declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO as a well-preserved example of a Southeast Asian trading port of the 15th to 19th centuries, with buildings that display a unique blend of local and foreign influences. H?i An attracts a fair number of tourists, also being a well-established place on the backpacker trail. Many visit for the numerous art and craft shops and tailors, who produce made-to-measure clothes for a fraction of the Western price. Several Internet cafes, bars and restaurants have opened along the riverfront. H?i An is famed for its centuries old cao l?u noodle, which can only be uniquely served here.The town is also famed for its unique lanterns.

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