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Rayburn Cookers


rayburn cookers
    cookers
  • (cooker) a utensil for cooking
  • (Cooker) person who makes crack cocaine or methamphetamine.
  • (The Cooker) The Cooker is an album by jazz trumpeter Lee Morgan released on the Blue Note label in 1957. It was recorded on September 29, 1957 and features performances by Morgan, Pepper Adams, Bobby Timmons, Paul Chambers and Philly Joe Jones.
  • An appliance used for cooking food

Eagle Range 'Kitchener' 2
Eagle Range 'Kitchener' 2
Part of a large range, made by Eagle Range & Gas Stove Co Ltd, of 127 Regent Street, London. Their showrooms are no longer there, Eagle having developed into the modern day Rangemaster, based in Leamington Spa. From Rangemaster's web site: The Rangemaster story begins in 1777 (when the United States of America had only been independent of Great Britain for one year) with the enterprising John Flavel. He started a foundry specialising first in ‘vapour baths’ inspired by the spas of Leamington; then moving into cooking stoves. In 1803 – the operation first moved to Leamington Spa where generations of the Flavel family were to become civic leaders in the town and the factory became a major local employer. The mighty Eagle Foundry was then built in 1833. On what is now the press shop area of the current Leamington site. In 1859 it was described as "the largest manufactory of it’s kind in the world". The new foundry enabled John’s son, William, to expand and develop his epoch-making 1830 invention, the 'Kitchener' range cooker. Manufactured in cast iron and heated by solid fuel, the 'Kitchener' could be used to boil, roast, bake and warm – all from the same heat source. It was hailed as one of the greatest domestic institutions of the 19th Century. The Kitchener A contemporary advertisement at the time described it as: - "the most ready means of performing in the best manner, either separately or at the same time, all the operations of cooking with only one fire, and that an open one, which may be of any size to suit the kitchen of the smallest cottage, or the largest mansion or hotel.... its arrangement is so simple, in every department of the culinary process, that servants cannot easily disorder or mismanage it." Its status was unquestioned from Queen Victoria to Edward VII, the King of Italy and the Emperor of Germany – all had ‘Kitchener’ stoves. And for all the lords and ladies of the land, it was not just a status symbol but part of the way of life – as Aga was later to become. In 1844, on the death of William Flavel, his son, Sidney Flavel, took over and ran the firm. In his hands the Kitchener continued to dominate. In 1851, Sidney Flavel exhibited the ‘Kitchener’ at the Great Exhibition held at Crystal Palace. The exhibition was attended by some 19,000 companies and it demonstrated the supremacy of British manufacturing at that time. Only 17 gold prize medals with special approbations were awarded and one such medal went to the ‘Kitchener’. The ‘Kitchener’ was shown to Her Majesty Queen Victoria, who visited the exhibition with her aunt, the Duchess of Gloucester. The Duchess ordered a ‘Kitchener’ for Kensington Palace. Between 1851 and 1905 the ‘Kitchener’ won many more awards and gold medals throughout the world. As the Victorian era wore on, the ‘Kitchener’ went from strength to strength. Following the First World War, developments in gas and electricity paved the way for the next generation of cookers. Much of the historic cast iron technology was adopted by Rangemaster's sister company Aga, passing to Alastair Darby's foundry at Coalbrookedale, where Aga and Rayburns have been made since 1946.
Eagle Range 'Kitchener' 1
Eagle Range 'Kitchener' 1
Part of a large range, made by Eagle Range & Gas Stove Co Ltd, of 127 Regent Street, London. Their showrooms are no longer there, having developed into the modern day Rangemaster, based in Leamington Spa. From Rangemaster's website: The Rangemaster story begins in 1777 (when the United States of America had only been independent of Great Britain for one year) with the enterprising John Flavel. He started a foundry specialising first in ‘vapour baths’ inspired by the spas of Leamington; then moving into cooking stoves. In 1803 – the operation first moved to Leamington Spa where generations of the Flavel family were to become civic leaders in the town and the factory became a major local employer. The mighty Eagle Foundry was then built in 1833. On what is now the press shop area of the current Leamington site. In 1859 it was described as "the largest manufactory of it’s kind in the world". The new foundry enabled John’s son, William, to expand and develop his epoch-making 1830 invention, the 'Kitchener' range cooker. Manufactured in cast iron and heated by solid fuel, the 'Kitchener' could be used to boil, roast, bake and warm – all from the same heat source. It was hailed as one of the greatest domestic institutions of the 19th Century. The Kitchener A contemporary advertisement at the time described it as: - "the most ready means of performing in the best manner, either separately or at the same time, all the operations of cooking with only one fire, and that an open one, which may be of any size to suit the kitchen of the smallest cottage, or the largest mansion or hotel.... its arrangement is so simple, in every department of the culinary process, that servants cannot easily disorder or mismanage it." Its status was unquestioned from Queen Victoria to Edward VII, the King of Italy and the Emperor of Germany – all had ‘Kitchener’ stoves. And for all the lords and ladies of the land, it was not just a status symbol but part of the way of life – as Aga was later to become. In 1844, on the death of William Flavel, his son, Sidney Flavel, took over and ran the firm. In his hands the Kitchener continued to dominate. In 1851, Sidney Flavel exhibited the ‘Kitchener’ at the Great Exhibition held at Crystal Palace. The exhibition was attended by some 19,000 companies and it demonstrated the supremacy of British manufacturing at that time. Only 17 gold prize medals with special approbations were awarded and one such medal went to the ‘Kitchener’. The ‘Kitchener’ was shown to Her Majesty Queen Victoria, who visited the exhibition with her aunt, the Duchess of Gloucester. The Duchess ordered a ‘Kitchener’ for Kensington Palace. Between 1851 and 1905 the ‘Kitchener’ won many more awards and gold medals throughout the world. As the Victorian era wore on, the ‘Kitchener’ went from strength to strength. Following the First World War, developments in gas and electricity paved the way for the next generation of cookers. Much of the historic cast iron technology was adopted by Rangemaster's sister company Aga, passing to Alastair Darby's foundry at Coalbrookedale, where Aga and Rayburns have been made since 1946.

rayburn cookers
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