A Case for THecology

    Who are we?

    · We are a student group that formed at the School of Theology in 2009, working toward ecological healing and justice, locally and globally.

    · The poorest communities suffer the most from the environmental damages perpetuated by our society and by us as individuals. THecology incorporates both individual transformation and social advocacy, to help each person in our STH, BU, and local communities learn how to take responsibility for our impact.

    · Consistent with our prophetic tradition, through such prophets as Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the STH sees the ecological crisis as a crisis of the spirit. Healing for the Earth must involve not only new laws and personal habits, but also a change in the way we view one another and the rest of the natural world. We must recognize our kinship with all earth’s peoples and creatures in order to find solutions that enable the well-being of diverse cultures and species.

    What do we do?

    · We raise awareness at the STH about environmental and eco-justice issues.

    · We work to help green the STH building; for example, in our first year we implemented a recycling program, and we switched the coffee stations to Dean’s Beans fair trade coffee (from Orange, MA).

    · We help green the STH curriculum, so that preachers in training can go out and help educate congregations and participate in environmental and eco-justice advocacy.

    · We work together with other BU environmental groups and programs in various efforts, such as the sleep out in anticipation of the Climate Treaty in Copenhagen last December (our Dean, Mary Elizabeth Moore, slept out with us, too!); the International Day of Climate Action; and Earth Week.

    · We work with other STH groups, such as the Korean Student Association, the Black Seminarians, CAUSE, and Sacred Worth, to explore eco-justice in their communities.

    · We created an Earth Justice Pledge, incorporating environmental concerns with the prophetic tradition of the STH to work for justice, such that members of the STH would have a spiritual and pastoral resource for personal and congregational growth and advocacy in ecological issues.

    · We work together with other seminaries in the Boston Theological Institute to collaborate on ecological education and advocacy.

    What Are Our Goals?

    · In the future, we would like to continue to green the STH further, with projects such as a community garden, a green roof, composting, paperless curricula, solar panels and/or wind turbines, and energy/heat efficient upgrades.

    · We want further to build our relationships with other BU and local groups in shared agendas and advocacy.

    · We want each person who comes to the STH to leave understanding her or his role as a member of an ecosystem, where our choices can both heal and damage the ability of the ecosystem to flourish. We want each graduate not only to perceive these connections, but also to have the resources to take justice and hope into congregations and communities.
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