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These series included an array of courses, slide shows, group activities and more revolving around the themes of
self-reliance and sustainability.  In developing these events, we aimed to build connections within our community,
create active, engaging educational opportunities, help spread the understanding and application of permaculture design
and develop a more active, skilled community.  In an effort to reach as many interested individuals as possible,
we offer a sliding scale "tuition" schedule for all workshops (except those marked otherwise). 
No interested participant will be turned away for lack of funds. 
If you’re interested in a course, let us know and we’ll make it happen.

Click Here to view directions to workshop locations.


THE 2010 WINTER WORKSHOP SERIES LINEUP

INTRODUCTION TO STONE WALL BUILDING 
(January-March) REGISTRATION REQUIRED 8:30AM-3:30PM at Queen City Soil & Stone, 134 Ferguson Ave., Burlington DATES: Sat. January 23, Sat. February 6, Sat. February 20, Sat. March 6, Fri. March 19, and Sat. March 27. Focus on the basic techniques for creating dry-laid garden retaining walls and free-standing walls using field stone and rounded cobbles. The workshops are hands-on, meaning you will work directly with stone native to Vermont. $100. Call Charley MacMartin at (802) 318-2411 to register. 

INTRODUCTION TO PERMACULTURE DESIGN 
6:30-8:30PM on Thurs. January 21 at Burlington Public Works 645 Pine St. Permaculture is the study and practice of the ways human beings, as individuals and societies, can participate in creating ethical and ecological support systems. It is a design science that integrates a wealth of complementary disciplines including agriculture, forestry, energy production and management, economics, transportation, architecture and community development with the intention of creating permanent, truly sustainable human settlements through appropriate, protracted design. Explore the ethics and principles of permaculture design and gain a solid introduction to the permaculture design process.  $10 suggested donation. 
Co-hosted by Burlington Parks & Rec Dept. 

BREAD MAKING 
3:00-5:00PM on Sat., January 23 at Game Room, University Heights S, University of Vermont. Here you will learn hands-on about topics including sourdough or wild-yeasted bread, straight dough making, pre-ferments, shaping, baking with whole grains, baking in masonry ovens, building masonry ovens... and more! Tastings afterwards! Donations welcome. 

WINTER TREE IDENTIFICATION 
2:00-4:00PM on Sun. January 24 - Meet at City Hall Park Fountain. This afternoon event, led by permaculture designer Mark Krawczyk, will focus on the winter identification characteristics of trees and shrubs.  We'll explore the species diversity that surrounds us in Burlington, learning how to distinguish woody plants based on their foliage, branching patterns, buds, twigs, leaf scars, bark, growth form and habitat.  This event will be outdoors, so dress appropriately and bring an eastern tree field guide if you have one. Donations Welcome. 

NATURAL HISTORY OF CENTENNIAL WOODS WALK 
2:00-4:00PM on Sun. January 31. Meet at Centennial Woods Entrance, off East Ave. Burlington. Join Teage O'Connor for a walk around the forest and look at the intersection between the urban landscape of Burlington and the wild animals that call this 80+ acre refuge their home. Bring snowshoes and something warm to drink as we investigate several mysteries. Free. 

MASONRY HEATER BUILDING LECTURE 
7:00-9:00PM on Tue. February 2. Burington Co-Housing Community Room - 180 East Ave (turn north on 'East Village Terrace').  William Davenport will cover the basics of masonry heater origins and current use. We will discuss masonry heater construction and design in the modern home, daily use, and performance data.  Topics will also include: European regional styles, materials use, current regulatory conditions (air shed), biomass heating, and more. 
Free to attend. 

BEEHIVE BUILDING REGISTRATION REQUIRED 
10:00AM-4:00PM on Sat. February 6 at Pine Street Studios: 339A Pine Street Burlington. Make your own Langstroth beehive from 1’ x 8’ lumber.  Participants need basic woodworking with power tools skills. Cost: Materials - a list will be e-mailed to each person. To registercontact carolstenvt@yahoo.com 

PERMACULTURE & COPPICING to REVITALIZE URBAN LANDSCAPES 
6:30-8:00PM on Tues. February 9 at the Robert Miller Community and Recreation Center, 130 Gosse Crt. Burlington New North End. Mark Krawczyk shares the history, process and management of coppice woodland in Britain and explores its application to forest management in New England. Coppicing is a traditional forestry system in which broadleaf trees are cut during the dormant season and allowed to re-grow as several stems from the still-living stump. As our culture rapidly approaches a period of energy descent, coppicing could help to provide a steady source of poles and biomass for fuel, fencing materials, building and craft. It is a model for sustainable forestry that only grows more productive with each passing generation. Free to attend. 

HAND TOOL SHARPENING & MAINTENANCE 
5:30-7:30PM on Tues. February 16 at 30 Monroe St. in the Old North End, Burlington. Sharp, clean tools make work more enjoyable, efficient, and safe. In this workshop Paul Schwartzkopf will cover the basics of sharpening and maintaining hand tools such as shovels, mattocks, chisels, knives, and more.  Feel free to bring your own tools that could use a little extra care.  
$5 Suggested Donation. 

EDIBLE FOREST GARDENS 
6:30-8:30PM on Thurs. February 18 at Burlington Public Works 645 Pine St. Join permaculture designer Mark Krawczyk for an introduction to the concepts, design and maintenance of forest gardens - integrated gardens modeled on the structure of natural forests that incorporate fruiting tress, shrubs, and vegetables, fertility providing plants, medicinals, beneficial insect habitat and more. Well suited to compact urban lots, forest gardens can be as simple or complex as you like and grow in productivity with each passing year. $10 Suggested Donation. 
Co-sponsored by Burlington Parks & Recreation Department. 

Supporting Farms with Food Currency & Buying Clubs - Free!
Wednesday, February 24 - 7-9pm - Fletcher Free Library, Burlington
Join us for a discussion about some exciting new ways we can support local farmers and get more value for our food dollars at the same time.  Local, organic food doesn't have to be prohibitively expensive compared to the supermarket.  Learn about a new food currency that's being developed to increase food security and food storage, and provide consumers with lower cost food.  We will also be discussing how to organize group buying locally as a means towards building community trust, helping each other out through tough economic times while lowering our costs for items we use regularly as well as supporting our local farms and other local producers.

MODEL MAKING 
2:00-4:00PM on Sun. February 28 at 30 Monroe St. in the Old North End. If you ever dream of building a house, designing a working landscape, or adapting the built environment around you, small scale models are an effective way to visualize ideas.  In this workshop we will introduce methods of creating accurate models of structures and landscapes.  Materials will be provided, though feel free to bring any plans or photos for projects you may be working on.  
$5 Suggested Donation. 

LAWN-TO-GARDEN CONVERSIONS 
6:30-8:30PM on Thurs. March 11.  Burlington Public Works Building - 645 Pine St. In this evening workshop led by Mark Krawczyk, we will discuss simple, chemical-free strategies to eliminate lawn, build healthy soil and establish beautiful, productive gardens. Additionally, we'll examine the design, installation and maintenance of perennial, edible forest gardens, providing a dynamic, productive alternative to conventional landscaping. Donations welcome.
Co-sponsored by Burlington Department of Parks and Recreation 

LANDSCAPE PLAN GRAPHICS 101 
12:30PM-5:00PM on Sat. March 20 in Room 9 University Heights S, UVM. During this workshop we will go over the basic professional  conventions for formatting your drawing as well as what to include  for presentation and/or construction purposes. We’ll cover specific  line making techniques and how to put them together to delineate various landscape design elements such as trees, shrubs, structures, stonework, water features and more! By the end of the afternoon you will have mastered some good, quick, freehand drawing techniques. Space is limited for this workshop. Please contact Susie J. Gray to pre-register atsusiej.gray@yahoo.com or 802-524-3435. $35 (sliding scale).

INTRO TO BEER BREWING - REGISTRATION REQUIRED 
12:00-2:30PM on Sat. March 27 at 24 1/2 Saint Louis St, Burlington. Come learn the basics of beer brewing!  Become familiar with the equipment and basic techniques for making your own brown ale. We'll be brewing one batch and bottling a second batch at the workshop. Extra points if you bring your own bottles! (No twist offs please) $5. Contact rachel.schattman@gmail.com to register. Co-instructed by Justin Sauerwein. 



2010 WINTER WORKSHOP SERIES FLYERS
CLICK EACH TO VIEW DETAILS

       



2009 SUMMER WORKSHOP SERIES FLYERS











2008-9 WINTER WORKSHOP SERIES

Energy Efficiency for Your Home - Wed. 1/7 - Burlington Infoshop 
This evening workshop led by John Lincoln of Burlington Electric features a presentation and discussion on home-scale strategies to reduce energy consumption. 6pm Free! 

Introduction to Permaculture Design - Sat. 1/10 - UVM Greenhouse

This intensive workshop covers the ethics and principles of permaculture design and provides a solid introduction to the permaculture design process.  Permaculture is the study and practice of the ways human beings, as individuals and societies, can participate in creating ethical and ecological support systems.  It is a design science that integrates a wealth of complementary disciplines including agriculture, forestry, energy production and management, economics, transportation, architecture and community development with the intention of creating permanent, truly sustainable human settlements through appropriate, protracted design.  Vermont-based permaculture designers Michael Blazewicz, Keith Morris, and Mark Krawczyk lead. 10am-4pm $35.
 
Rain Gardens: How Water Can Transform a Community - Mon. 1/12 - UVM
This evening workshop will focus on Permaculture and ecological design solutions for multiple water issues.  We will explore how landscape designs can transform the aesthetics, recreational, and ecological importance of a site and improve the quality of our most precious resource.  6:30-8pm. By donation.
 
Re-Envisioning Burlington - Wed. 1/14 - Fletcher Free Library
Join a panel of permaculture designers, educators, and visionaries for a detailed assessment of Burlington's ecology, neighborhood distribution, and community resources followed by an active discussion and design session during which we discuss ideas and vision of a more vibrant, productive, resilient community.    
6:30-9pm Free!
 
DIY Water Filtration - Sun. 1/18 - Burlington Infoshop
Julia Kirk and Mark Krawczyk discuss the pollutants present in municipal water, rainwater, gray and blackwater; share simple home-scale solutions and strategies for water treatment; and teach participants how to refill their their activated carbon pitcher style (Brita, Pur, etc.) water filters.  We'll look at conventional storm and wastewater treatment processes; simple, home-scale strategies including graywater systems, composting toilets and urine seperation; and purification processes that include carbon filtration and photoremediation.  Please bring a used water cartridge to refill. 10am - 3pm $20 suggested donation.
 
Winter Tree Identification - Sun. 1/18 - Burlington City Hall Park
This afternoon event, led by permaculture designer Mark Krawczyk, will focus on the winter identification characteristics of trees and shrubs.  Starting at City Hall park, we'll explore the species diversity that surrounds us in Burlington, learning how to distinguish woody plants based on their foliage, branching patterns, buds, twigs, leaf scars, bark, growth form and habitat and how to use a field guide and dichotomous key to help guide us.  This event will be held outdoors, so dress appropriately please bring an eastern tree field guide if you have on.  Meet at the fountain in Burlington's City Hall Park at 3:30 - the walk will last approximately two hours.  Suggested donation $5.
 
Biofuels 101: Converting the Diesel Engine to run on Vegetable Oil - Wed. 1/21 - Burlington Infoshop
In this evening workshop led by Michael Blazewicz, we will discuss the different biofuels on the market and provide an overview of the process to convert a diesel engine (car, tractor, generator, home furnace) to run on recycled vegetable oil.  We will also look into some of the agricultural models that would make biofuel production truly sustainable.  6:30 - 8:30 pm.  By donation.
 
Developing Local Economies - Wed. 1/28 - Burlington Infoshop
This evening workshop led by Amy Kirschner provides an overview of the philosophy, history, and current state of the local currency movement and an introduction to Time Banking, a neighbor to neighbor service exchange, and Vermont Sustainable Exchange, a statewide business to business trading system.  She was previously the Executive Director of the Burlington Currency Project and frequently writes and speaks about monetary theory and practice.  6:30-8:30 pm Time Bank suggested donation.
 
Natural Building in the Northeast - Sun. 2/8 - UVM Greenhouse
Jacob Racusin and Mark Krawczyk of Seven Generations Natural Builders discuss design strategies, principles and materials suited to creating natural buildings appropriate to our challenging climate here in the northeast.  The course consists of lecture, slide presentations, discussions, and hands-on design work.  10am - 5pm. Tuition is $50 though no one will be turned away for lack of funds.   
 
Forest Gardening - Tues. 2/10 & Thurs. 2/12 - UVM Greenhouse (rm. 133)
Permaculture designers Keith Morris and Mark Krawczyk lead an introduction to the concepts, design and maintenance of forest gardens - integrated gardens modeled on the structure of natural forests that incorporate fruiting tress, shrubs, and vegetables, fertility providing plants, medicinals, beneficial insect habitat and more.  Forest gardens can be as simple or complex as you like and are well suited to compact urban lots.  6:30-9pm both nights.  Tution is $20 per night or $35 for both, though no one will be turned away for lack of funds. 
 
Make Your Own Pamphlet Great! - Wed. 2/11 - UVM Greenhouse
Learn how to communicate your philosophies and ideas on paper, as well as, learn how to make people's literature both visually intriguing and verbally effective using only your mind, recycled materials, pencils, and pens.  6:30 - 8:30 pm $15.
 
Weave an Adirondack-Style Pack Basket - Sun. 3/1 - UVM Greenhouse
Basket maker and dairy farmer Jody Stoddard of Craftsbury, Vermont teaches students the art of Adirondack-style pack basket weaving.  Register early as class size is limted. 10am - 4pm $35 (+$35 materials).

Mycoscaping: Mushrooms in the Permaculture Landscape - Wed. 3/18 - UVM 
How can we incorporate delicious, nutritious, fungi in our vegetable gardens, food forests, lawns, and landscaping? In this workshop, led by Rafter Sass, we'll learn some of the options available to us, and even try on or two! We'll learn how to look at mushroom crops through a holistic, permaculture lens, and find the right niche in the landscape where they can perform useful ecological functions, even as they produce food and medicine for us. We'll review common and less-common mushroom crops, and different cultivation techniques.  We'll also talk about how to smart and safe when dealing with the mushroom kingdom. 6:30-8:30pm. $5-$15.
 
Liberation Ecology - Sat. 3/21 - Burlington Infoshop
What would "sustainability" look like, if it refused to sustain white supremacy?  What could "liberation" look like, in a society headed for ecological collapse?  In this experiential workshop, participants begin to develop answers to these questions in an environment of collaboration, experiment, and wrestling with some hard questions. Mini-design projects, Daylighting Exercises, presentation, and facilitated discussion, help participants draw new maps of our situation, and chart new paths forward to a truly sustainable society. Check out www.liberationecology.org for more details.  1-3pm. Free but a donation is encouraged.
 
Lawn to Garden Conversions - Tues. 3/24 - Burlington Infoshop
In this evening workshop led by Mark Krawczyk, we will discuss simple, chemical-free strategies to eliminate lawn, build healthy soil and establish beautiful, productive gardens.  Additionally, we'll examine the design, installation and maintenance of perennical, edible forest gardens, providing a dynamic, productive alterntaive to conventional landscaping.  6:30 - 8pm.  By donation.
 
Coppice Forestry Presentation - Wed. 3/25 - Fletcher Free Library
Mark Krawczyk shares the history, process and management of coppice woodland in Britain and explores its application to forest management in New England.  Coppicing is a traditional forestry system in which broadleaf trees are cut during the dormant season and allowed to re-grow as several stems from the still-living stump.  When planted densely and managed regularly coppiced woodlands yield a remarkable amont of biomass due to the fact that new poles re-sprout from already vigorous and well-established root systsm.  Coppiced woodlands sustained the growth and development of Britain for centuries after having virtually decimated their native forests by the year 1000.  As our culture rapidly approaches a period of energy descent, coppicing could help to provide a steady source of poles and biomass for fuel, fencing materials, building and craft.  It is a model for sustainable forestry that only grows more productive with each passing generation.  Fletcher Free Library 
6:30 - 9pm.  $5 suggested donation.
 
Building Healthy Community Economies: Financial Permaculture in Burlington - Fletcher Free Library Community Room - Wed. 4/8
Building upon the insights of both finance and permaculture, financial permaculture aims to build financial ecosystems that create return for the investor as well as the network. Mapping one's local environment is essential and mapping the financial environment allows one to complete the picture. Then restorative solutions such as green incubators and investment funds, natural homebuilding, and Investment Circles can begin to create healthier local economies that keep more value locally. Led by John Maeck, this workshop discusses the important roles of trust, learning communities, and positive local investment networks to create positive resource flows.  It also looks at the relationship between faith, values, and integrity in building healthier economies.  6:30-9pm. Free! 

Lawn to Garden Conversions - Saturday 4/18 - Red Wagon Plants 2408 Shelburne Falls Rd., Hinesburg, VT
10am - 12pm  -
$10 - Registration and more information at 482-4060 In this morning workshop led by Mark Krawczyk, we will discuss simple, chemical-free strategies to eliminate lawn, build healthy soil and establish beautiful, productive gardens.  Additionally, we'll examine the design, installation and maintenance of perennial, edible forest gardens, providing a dynamic, productive alternative to conventional landscaping.
 
Apple Tree Grafting Workshops - Sun. 4/19, 1-4pm at Burlington Infoshop and Mon. 4/20, 6-8pm at On the Rise bakery in Richmond, Vt
Two sessions are offered this season with Alissa White, Nicko Rubin, Chris Jackson, and Michael Blazewicz of Burlington Permaculture, East Hill Tree Farm, and Winooski Valley Permaculture. Explore the history and practice of propogating apple trees, learn to graft onto seeding rootstock or established trees, and take home your newly grafted fruit tree! This hands-on workshop is geared for beginners, offering tools, tips, and a variety of techniques for grafting apple trees. The successful graft takes a bit of art, science and a touch of love.  Rootstock and scionwood provided. We encourage you to bring scion from your favorite old apple trees to graft and share. Suggested donation of $30 includes a tree to take home. Rootstock supply is limited - please contact Alissa to register ahead of time and request additional rootstock at aceraceae@gmail.com.


May 2 - Liberation Ecology Part II - Strategies for Change Social Justice, Ecological Health, and Project Design 1-4 pm
How can we channel our desires for change so that our work builds on the connections between ecological and social issues - instead of choosing between? Can we approach social change in a 'design perspective', creating projects that act as interventions into the status quo? What is our role as change agents, and what tools are at our disposal? We'll address these questions in a facilitated, exercise- and discussion-driven format.  Led by Rafter Sass.  This workshop will expand on the foundation laid in Part 1, but attendance at the earlier workshop is not required.  Admission by donation: 15¢ - $15. All are welcome.

Thursday May 7 - An Evening of Beginner Gardening At Red Wagon Plants - 2408 Shelburne Falls Road, Hinesburg 5:30-7:00
Please join Annie Harlow, of Red Wagon Plants, for a review of the basics.  Learn to grow the foods you love to eat and the plants you like to see.  This is a practical introduction to the small, productive garden and will cover topics such as soil preparation, fertility, inter-planting ornamentals and edibles and finding places for "pocket gardens" around the house. $10.00 - Pre-registration suggested 482-4060 www.redwagonplants.com

Wed. May 20 - When Worlds Collide: The Conflict between Sustainability and Exponential Growth - a presentation by Moshe Braner
Burlington Infoshop -  7 - 9pm

Are humans smarter than yeast? The jury's out until we learn to grapple with the indisputable facts and figures of exponential growth.After 200 years of population and industrial expansion, "growth" is a pervasive force in our economy and culture. By its very nature, growth is ever-accelerating. This leads to exhaustion of resources in a very short time. The on-going depletion of oil, forests, fisheries, soil,and groundwater are just some of the inevitable consequences. This talk will explore the inescapable arithmetic of exponential growth, and why, although progress and innovation are helpful, growth per se
must be abandoned if we are to build sustainable economies and communities.Moshe Braner holds a PhD in mathematical ecology (as well as backgrounds in physics and public health statistics), and draws upon this basis to spread energy literacy, assess the impact of Peak Oil, and suggest policy responses. 


WORKSHOP INSTRUCTOR BIOS HERE                      THE 2008-9 WORKSHOP FLIER HERE