INFORMATION ON A LAWYER. INFORMATION ON

Information on a lawyer. Top 100 law firms 2011. Arizona attorney bankruptcy.

Information On A Lawyer


information on a lawyer
    information on
  • (Information Only) Source provided information to DOJ which did not require action. For example, sending DOJ a copy of a questionable advertisement or solicitation.
    lawyer
  • A person who practices or studies law; an attorney or a counselor
  • A lawyer, according to Black's Law Dictionary, is "a person learned in the law; as an attorney, counsel or solicitor; a person licensed to practice law.
  • a professional person authorized to practice law; conducts lawsuits or gives legal advice
  • The burbot (Lota lota), from old french barbot, is the only freshwater gadiform (cod-like) fish. It is also known as mariah, the lawyer, and (misleadingly) eelpout, and closely related to the common ling and the cusk. It is the only member of the genus Lota.
information on a lawyer - Sex Discrimination
Sex Discrimination and Law Firm Culture on the Internet: Lawyers at the Information Age Watercooler
Sex Discrimination and Law Firm Culture on the Internet: Lawyers at the Information Age Watercooler
Despite the availability of some formal legal remedies, women attorneys rarely sue their employers, and often do not challenge discriminatory behavior. This book explores this seemingly contradictory situation, where lawyers fail to employ the legal system on their own behalf. By exploring attorneys’ use of legal discourse in an Internet community, Baumle examines whether the law can in fact serve as a useful tool to challenge inequality. The Internet community itself provides a protected, semi-anonymous forum in which to engage in such discourse, thereby subverting many of the barriers that currently exist to challenging gender inequality in the legal practice.

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Law Watchdog faces threat of court fight - Scotland on Sunday 9 August 1999
Law Watchdog faces threat of court fight - Scotland on Sunday 9 August 1999
Law watchdog faces threat of court fight. Client prepares to sue after allegation that ombudsman compromised independence. By Peter Laing Scotland on Sunday August 8 1999 THE government-appointed watchdog charged with overseeing the complaints process against solicitors in Scotland is himself facing legal action. Scottish Legal Services Ombudsman Garry Watson has been accused of failing to handle properly a complaint against the Law Society of Scotland, the professional body which represents solicitors. Peter Cherbi says he intends to sue Watson claiming the ombudsman "took instructions" from the Law Society on what information to release about his case, and, therefore, compromised his independence. Cherbi, from Jedburgh, says Watson's handling of the case may have harmed his chances of ever recovering a ?300,000 inheritance from an incompetent solicitor. Cherbi has instructed his solicitor to begin legal proceedings against Watson, who could receive a write seeking damages within the next few weeks. It is believed to be the first time anyone has attempted to sue an ombudsman. Complaints against solicitors are investigated by the Law Society under a controversial system of self-regulation. Anyone who is unhappy with the decision of the Law Society can then ask for an investigation by the ombudsman, who has the power to make recommendations to the society. But the ombudsman is currently flooded with complex cases, and last month had to apologise for delays of up to a year in handling them. Cherbi's case started in 1990 when his 73-year-old father died, leaving behind an estate valued at around ?300,000. Four years later he realised the estate, which was handled by local lawyer Andrew Penman, was almost worthless. Cherbi believes the money was lost through avoidable interest payments, fees and the mishandled selling of shares and investments. Cherbi complained about Penman to the Law Society, who originally planned to prosecute him at a Scottish Solicitors Discipline Tribunal. But after written submissions regarding Penman were received, they decided instead on a reprimand and ordered him to pay ?1000 compensation to Cherbi's estate. Angry at the Law Society's decision, Cherbi complained to the ombudsman in May 1997. Watson investigated and concluded : "It is most important that there is transparency of decision-making within committees." Watson added he and Cherbi should be told why the Law Society decided not to prosecute Penman. But un June 1997, Watson informed Cherbi that the Law Society had sent him the written submissions relating to Penman on the basis they remained confidential, and that the case was closed. For the past two years, Watson and Cherbi have exchanged increasingly acrimonious letters on the subject. Cherbi said : "In my opinion, by accepting the submissions about Penman on the basis that he would not divulge their contents, he has effectively been told what to do by the Law Society. "As ombudsman he should be telling the Law Society what to do. I believe he has compromised the independence of his office. "In my opinion, by not handling my case correctly, and refusing to pass on important information, he has made it more difficult to recover any of the inheritance I lost. For that reason, I have instructed my solicitor to begin proceedings for compensation" Watson has refused to comment on the case. But in a letter he sent to Cherbi in February last year, he explained why the representations regarding Penman were not passed on. He wrote "I ascertained that they [the representations] related entirely to the personal circumstances of the solicitor and had nothing to do with yourself. I can certainly see no reason why there should be a need for me to pass on information when it did not relate to, and was not relevant to, yourself. To suggest my actions compromise the independence of my office is patently absurd." Watson, who was prepared to talk to Scotland on Sunday on general terms, added : "I deny any suggestion that my office is influenced by the Law Society.It is totally independent." Watson said a new member of staff had been taken on to help bring down the time taken to deal with cases. he hopes to bring the average delay down from a year to two-four months. The Scottish Consumer Council, in a report released earlier this year, revealed problems with the ombudsman, including that 85% of people whose complaints were not upheld by the ombudsman did not receive a satisfactory explanation.
"Hagamos Pancho" / Approved information on Pancho Villa's life
"Hagamos Pancho" / Approved information on Pancho Villa's life
General Information for our English Speaking Friends: Pancho Villa, whose real name was Juan Perez, was born in the City of Chihuahua in Eighteen Fifty Seven. He was an amazing Polo player. That is why his statues often depict him on a horse. He played internationally in Polo Tournaments around the globe (India and the USSR being his favourite places to practice ). He was also known for using a different hat every time he played. Some people say he had an amazing collection of over two thousand hats. Some other people just went nuts when they saw the collection and refuse to speak. He won respect from other collectionists who called them "El General" (the General). However, this also generated some envy around him. Other Hatters hated him for his hats and for his superb Polo skills. Eventually, one of his hatter haters provoked an accident which ended Francisco's Life when he was at the top of his skills. ---- Por eso y mucho mas: Sufragio Electivo.

information on a lawyer
information on a lawyer
The practical lawyer: a handbook of legal information on all subjects of interest and importance in the various relations of life.
The Making of the Modern Law: Legal Treatises, 1800-1926 includes over 20,000 analytical, theoretical and practical works on American and British Law. It includes the writings of major legal theorists, including Sir Edward Coke, Sir William Blackstone, James Fitzjames Stephen, Frederic William Maitland, John Marshall, Joseph Story, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and Roscoe Pound, among others. Legal Treatises includes casebooks, local practice manuals, form books, works for lay readers, pamphlets, letters, speeches and other works of the most influential writers of their time. It is of great value to researchers of domestic and international law, government and politics, legal history, business and economics, criminology and much more.
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The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification:
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Harvard Law School Library

ocm14371668

Includes index.

London ; New York : G. Routledge and Sons, 1878. 640 p. ; 19 cm.

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