FAQs

What are the first steps in Play Therapy?
 
Your child’s play therapist will meet with you to discuss your concerns, your hopes and your wishes.  After that, s/he will want to meet your child to gain a fuller understanding of the situation and what is bothering them. This process, of four to six sessions is usually called an ‘Assessment’ and it is helpful at this time if you can provide information about your child’s and his/her family history.

From these initial sessions, your therapist will:
  • Suggest a best way forward 
  • Indicate the number and frequency of sessions that are likely to be required
  • Identify ways in which you can help the therapy to be most effective.

How many sessions of Play Therapy will my child need?
As everyone is so individual, the number of sessions after the Assessment can range from 12 to approx. 35 one-to-one play therapy sessions, sometimes more.  Your child’s play therapist will be able to give you an indication at the end of the Assessment.   Sometimes, your child’s behavior or symptoms may appear to get worse at first;  this is quite normal and you should contact your child’s play therapist to let them know and discuss supportive strategies. 

How can I pay for Play Therapy?
Play Therapy can seem like an enormous cost to a family trying to meet everyday needs.  It may mean going without a family holiday or other treats. It’s worth bearing in mind the emotional, and sometimes practical costs, or one or more members of the family being very unhappy and weighing this against the cost of play therapy.  If finding the funds feel impossible and you are sure play therapy is something you want for your child, please call us to discuss any ideas we may have for spreading the costs as well as other ideas 

How many counselling sessions will I need?
As everyone is so individual, the number of sessions after the Assessment (hyperlink to Assessment page) can range upwards from 6 one-to-one counselling sessions.  Your counsellor will be able to give you an indication at the end of the Assessment.

How long do counselling sessions last?
About an hour. This includes time to make any arrangements such as another date.  Our first session usually takes about one and a half hours.
What are the first next steps for Counselling? Your Counsellor will meet with you to discuss your concerns, your hopes and your wishes; if you are unsure whether working with me or about whether counselling is for you, you can book an ‘Introductory Meeting’.  Next, it is helpful if you can provide information about your family history and the background to your difficulties.  This process is often called an ‘Assessment’ 

From these initial sessions, your therapist will:
  • Suggest a best way forward for you to think about.
  • Indicate the number and frequency of sessions that are likely to be required
  • Identify ways in which you can help the therapy to be most effective.
How much will it cost me?
You can click here to find out more about charges for Counselling and Play Therapy.  

What sort of counselling do you do? 
You can find out more about the sort of counselling I offer here

What sort of play therapy do you do?
You can find out more about the sort of Play Therapy I offer here.

Do I really need an Assessment?
It’s important that  the time and money spent by you, and any other people or organisations involved, are well spent.   Assessments are ‘therapeutic’ in their own right’  -  and lots of people find them a really useful way of clarifying:

What sort of things does an Assessment consider? 
Here’s a list of the sort of things an Assessment will be considering:
  • Attachment and Relational Styles; 
  • Developmental levels and stages;
  • Relevant personal and family history 
  • If relevant, parenting styles
  • Any signs of Traumatic Stress
  • Strategies, internalised and external, for safety and support;
  • Therapeutic themes.

Do you do Play Therapy for older people?
Yes.  When we are Elderly, sometimes talking is just not what we want and we need to return to play as the best means of communicating and resolving what is bothering us.  It particularly helps with those who are tired of trying to be understood through talking, or who find thinking hard, such as when we have dementia. 

How do I know Play Therapy will help?
Child-centred Play Therapy is evidenced* as being an effective way to help children with a wide range of social, emotional and behavior difficulties. Whilst no guarantees can be made, there are regular opportunities to review progress, to discuss your concerns and to explore ways of maximizing the impact of the therapy.  

* Ray, D., Bratton, S., Rhine,  T., and Jones, L. (2001).  The effectiveness of play therapy. International Journal of Play Therapy, 10: 1.