GOLD PROSPECTING ADVENTURES : GOLD PROSPECTING

Gold prospecting adventures : White yellow gold necklace : Party for gold.

Gold Prospecting Adventures


gold prospecting adventures
    gold prospecting
  • Gold prospecting is the act of searching for new gold deposits. Methods used vary with the type of deposit sought and the resources of the prospector. Although traditionally a commercial activity, in some developed countries placer gold prospecting has also become a popular outdoor recreation.
  • Gold prospecting is the act of going equipped to find gold in rocks or in stream beds with a view to exploiting that discovery. This usually means individual prospectors, as opposed to those trained and educated individuals working for mining companies.
    adventures
  • (adventure) venture: put at risk; "I will stake my good reputation for this"
  • An unusual and exciting, typically hazardous, experience or activity
  • (adventure) a wild and exciting undertaking (not necessarily lawful)
  • A commercial speculation
  • (adventure) gamble: take a risk in the hope of a favorable outcome; "When you buy these stocks you are gambling"
  • Daring and exciting activity calling for enterprise and enthusiasm
gold prospecting adventures - The Blackwell
The Blackwell Claim
The Blackwell Claim
A WESTERN TRAIL BLAZER DIME NOVEL (SHORT STORY):

GOLD... Seeking a fortune from a pile of rocks or out of a streambed. Men from all walks of life are digging and panning for gold in the West and the Blackwell brothers are no different. But along with gold mining comes rough towns like Grizzly Gulch, fighting the elements, and those pesky claim jumpers. Raised tough in the hills of Tennessee, are the Blackwell brothers up to the challenges of prospecting?

Read the whole Blackwell series!
?
The Blackwell Claim
Blackwell's Stand
The Divided Prey
Blackwell's Run
The Windigo

A WESTERN TRAIL BLAZER DIME NOVEL (SHORT STORY):

GOLD... Seeking a fortune from a pile of rocks or out of a streambed. Men from all walks of life are digging and panning for gold in the West and the Blackwell brothers are no different. But along with gold mining comes rough towns like Grizzly Gulch, fighting the elements, and those pesky claim jumpers. Raised tough in the hills of Tennessee, are the Blackwell brothers up to the challenges of prospecting?

Read the whole Blackwell series!
?
The Blackwell Claim
Blackwell's Stand
The Divided Prey
Blackwell's Run
The Windigo

83% (6)
An Army Scout and Adventurer At Rest in the Simmons Cemetery in Prescott, Arizona
An Army Scout and Adventurer At Rest in the Simmons Cemetery in Prescott, Arizona
This is a photograph that I took of the government issued headstone marking the grave of Samuel Carson Miller in the Simmons Cemetery in the town of Prescott, Arizona. Miller was a cousin to the renowned frontiersman, mountain man and scout, Kit Carson. He was also the youngest member of the “Walker Party,” a group of frontiersmen who trekked into the wild and dangerous New Mexico Territory (later split into the Arizona and New Mexico Territories by President Abraham Lincoln) during the early 1860’s. Samuel Carson Miller was born to John Jacob Miller and Cecil Docia Carson in Peoria, Illinois on November 4, 1840. Miller and his family soon packed up their belongings and headed west to California. In early 1861, Miller, along with his father, his brother Jake, and four other men, formed a small party with the intent of journeying into the New Mexico Territory. In May of the year, their party met up with another group of men, also headed for the territories, in Grapevine Springs, California. The other group of men consisted of seven members led by Joseph R. Walker. The collective group took on the name of the “Walker Party.” The Walker Party journeyed across Northern Arizona and into Colorado. According to Samuel Miller, the party returned to Arizona in September 1862, this time traveling in a southwestern direction to explore the Verde River valley. During the time of the Walker Party’s journey, the United States Civil War was raging and Union troops had been stationed in the Arizona Territory to protect it from Confederate sympathizers. The Walker Party encountered a contingency of Union troops in November 1862, whose commander made the party individually swear allegiance to the United States and promise that they were not Confederate supporters. The men eventually reached the headwaters of the Hassayampa River. The Apaches proved a constant threat to the Walker Party and soon made it too dangerous for them to continue with their journey. To overcome the Apache threat, the members of the Walker Party devised a plan to kidnap Mangus Coloradas and hold him hostage as insurance against further Apache attacks. The Union Army soon learned of the Walker Party’s plans and offered their assistance because they were also engaged in a local war against the Apaches. During this time, Samuel Miller enlisted as a scout in Company A of the 3rd New Mexico Mounted Infantry to help the Union Army defeat Mangus Coloradas and the Apaches. The Union Army eventually captured the Apache Chief, who had been wounded earlier in battle. According to all accounts, the chief was weary of fighting and had stated that he wanted to live in peace for the rest of his days; however, the Union Army claimed that on the night of January 17, 1863, Mangus Coloradas attempted to escape and was subsequently shot and killed. After the Apache chief was killed, the Union Army and the members of the Walker Party traveled to the Hassayampa River where gold was quickly discovered. At the time these troops were fighting the Civil War and a local war against the Apache Indians; however, the federal need for gold called for the five week long gold mining expedition. The discovery of gold in the Hassayampa was instrumental to the Union cause and the establishment of the city of Prescott. The members of the Walker Party built the first permanent housing in what would soon become the Arizona territorial capitol. After the discovery of gold in the Hassayampa River, Miller decided to settle down in Prescott. He married Mary Frances Sanders in Prescott on April 4, 1867 and found employment as a rancher and a freighter working for local gold mining operations. The family lived in a respectable home in the region of Prescott known as “Miller Valley.” He died in Prescott on October 6, 1909 after a lifetime of adventure and hard work. At the time of his death, he was the last surviving member of the Walker Party that left Grapevine Springs many years before. He was preceded in death by his wife.
Branin Family Portrait 1880
Branin Family Portrait 1880
I have just finished transcribing 15 years of correspondence from my great-great-great uncle Ezra Hartwell (Hart) Branin (top right) to his brother, my great-great grandfather Willis Branin (seated at bottom right). It began in 1881 and went on until 1896. Most of his correspondence started while he was in St. Elmo, CO (now a ghost town). It was, for the most part, Hart's detailed account of his journeys and business prospects as he traveled into the wild west as a telegrapher for the Northern Pacific R.R., with gold mining and railroads at the center of it all. He had a wife, Olive (nee Van Winkle), and two children, Earl and Pearl. The letters end with a single letter from Olive, notifying Willis that Hart had died of tubercular peritonitis at the home of their brother Alvertis at age 39 in 1897. He died in Bellingham, WA, which at the time was known as New Whatcom. Judging by the tone of the letters, Hart seemed like he was an intelligent, level-headed optimist to the end. I only recently (yesterday) saw a photo of Hart and his family for the first time, and it was like meeting an old friend. This is probably the last photograph taken of this group of family, since they split and went in their separate ways right around 1880 and never returned to Iowa. Looking closely at the photo, I am starting to think that Hart had red hair, but it's hard to tell with the sepia tones. From top left: Alvertis Branin (1851-1916) Ezra Hartwell Branin (1852-1897) From bottom left: Chester Branin (1848-) Mahlon Branin (my great-great-great grandfather1820-1890) Willis I. Branin (my great-great grandfather 1846-1939)

gold prospecting adventures
gold prospecting adventures
DEVIL'S FORD (GOLD IN FRONTIER AMERICA)
DEVIL'S FORD SET IN GOLD COUNTRY AND THEIR STORY....HERE IS AN EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK....
It was a season of unequalled prosperity in Devil's Ford. The half a dozen cabins scattered along the banks of the North Fork, as if by some overflow of that capricious river, had become augmented during a week of fierce excitement by twenty or thirty others, that were huddled together on the narrow gorge of Devil's Spur, or cast up on its steep sides. So sudden and violent had been the change of fortune, that the dwellers in the older cabins had not had time to change with it, but still kept their old habits, customs, and even their old clothes. The flour pan in which their daily bread was mixed stood on the rude table side by side with the "prospecting pans," half full of gold washed up from their morning's work; the front windows of the newer tenements looked upon the one single thoroughfare, but the back door opened upon the uncleared wilderness, still haunted by the misshapen bulk of bear or the nightly gliding of catamount.
Neither had success as yet affected their boyish simplicity and the frankness of old frontier habits; they played with their new-found riches with the naive delight of children, and rehearsed their glowing future with the importance and triviality of school-boys.
"I've bin kalklatin'," said Dick Mattingly, leaning on his long- handled shovel with lazy gravity, "that when I go to Rome this winter, I'll get one o' them marble sharps to chisel me a statoo o' some kind to set up on the spot where we made our big strike. Suthin' to remember it by, you know."
"What kind o' statoo--Washington or Webster?" asked one of the Kearney brothers, without looking up from his work.
"No--I reckon one o' them fancy groups--one o' them Latin goddesses that Fairfax is always gassin' about, sorter leadin', directin' and bossin' us where to dig."

DEVIL'S FORD SET IN GOLD COUNTRY AND THEIR STORY....HERE IS AN EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK....
It was a season of unequalled prosperity in Devil's Ford. The half a dozen cabins scattered along the banks of the North Fork, as if by some overflow of that capricious river, had become augmented during a week of fierce excitement by twenty or thirty others, that were huddled together on the narrow gorge of Devil's Spur, or cast up on its steep sides. So sudden and violent had been the change of fortune, that the dwellers in the older cabins had not had time to change with it, but still kept their old habits, customs, and even their old clothes. The flour pan in which their daily bread was mixed stood on the rude table side by side with the "prospecting pans," half full of gold washed up from their morning's work; the front windows of the newer tenements looked upon the one single thoroughfare, but the back door opened upon the uncleared wilderness, still haunted by the misshapen bulk of bear or the nightly gliding of catamount.
Neither had success as yet affected their boyish simplicity and the frankness of old frontier habits; they played with their new-found riches with the naive delight of children, and rehearsed their glowing future with the importance and triviality of school-boys.
"I've bin kalklatin'," said Dick Mattingly, leaning on his long- handled shovel with lazy gravity, "that when I go to Rome this winter, I'll get one o' them marble sharps to chisel me a statoo o' some kind to set up on the spot where we made our big strike. Suthin' to remember it by, you know."
"What kind o' statoo--Washington or Webster?" asked one of the Kearney brothers, without looking up from his work.
"No--I reckon one o' them fancy groups--one o' them Latin goddesses that Fairfax is always gassin' about, sorter leadin', directin' and bossin' us where to dig."

See also:
mens gold band
neil young heart of gold video
gold neck wire
14k gold rosary bracelet
price of gold per gram
14k gold grams
gold coin proof sets
18k gold lighter
gold nugget watch band
Comments