Criminal Cortisol & Testosterone

Cross references:    Criminal Hormones     Testosterone    Cortisol    
Criminal Cortisol        Criminal Testosterone      Cortisol & Testosterone     



FINAL SUMMARY
OF TWO REFERENCES
1989 - 1996



    "
The delinquent group, which was characterized by flamboyant dress, drug use, and violence, had significantly higher Testosterone levels than the college students did, but the two groups did not differ regarding  Cortisol levels."    
    Circumstances
        1. 
university tennis players 
        2.  
college students and delinquents  
    Observations:    
 
        1.  Testosterone higher in winners, cortisol not different 
        2. 
Testosterone higher in delinquents, cortisol not different  




INITIAL SUMMARIES
OF THE REFERENCES


The references are designated by the first word of their title and their year of publication.    The references themselves follow this list of their initial summaries. 

Testosterone, and winning and losing ... 1989  
    "Winners with rising Testosterone had higher Testosterone before their next match, in contrast to losers with falling Testosterone, who had lower Testosterone before their next match."  
    "Cortisol was not related to winning or losing, but it was related to seed (top players having low cortisol)"   
    Circumstancessix university tennis players across six matches during their varsity season   
    Observations:  
mean Testosterone rose for winners relative to losers   
Cortisol was not related to winning or losing, but it was related to seed (top players having low cortisol)   


Salivary
Testosterone ... 1996   
    "The delinquent group, which was characterized by flamboyant dress, drug use, and violence, had significantly higher Testosterone levels than the college students did, but the two groups did not differ regarding  Cortisol levels."    
    Circumstances36 U.S. college students and 29 delinquent participants of a similar age   
    Observations
The delinquent group, which was characterized by flamboyant dress, drug use, and violence, had significantly higher Testosterone levels than the college students did, but the two groups did not differ regarding  Cortisol levels.    



THE REFERENCES


Testosterone, and winning and losing in human competition.  - 1989   
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2606468   
Only abstract available online. 
from the abstract 
    "
Testosterone and Cortisol were measured in six university tennis players across six matches during their varsity season. Testosterone rose just before most matches, and players with the highest prematch Testosterone had the most positive improvement in mood before their matches.  
    After matches, mean
Testosterone rose for winners relative to losers, especially for winners with very positive moods after their victories and who evaluated their own performance highly.  
    Winners with rising
Testosterone had higher Testosterone before their next match, in contrast to losers with falling Testosterone, who had lower Testosterone before their next match.  
   
Cortisol was not related to winning or losing, but it was related to seed (top players having low cortisol), and Cortisol generally declined as the season progressed. These results are consistent with a biosocial theory of status."    


Salivary
Testosterone and  Cortisol in a delinquent and violent urban subculture.  - 1996   
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8851447 
Abstract only online.   I got the PDF through the library.    
from the abstract     
    "Salivary
Testosterone and  Cortisol levels were measured in 36 U.S. college students and 29 delinquent participants of a similar age. Both groups of participants were made up of White men and women. The delinquent group, which was characterized by flamboyant dress, drug use, and violence, had significantly higher Testosterone levels than the college students did, but the two groups did not differ regarding  Cortisol levels."    



  















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