PICTURES OF FOXGLOVE FLOWERS : PICTURES OF

Pictures Of Foxglove Flowers : Gothic Wedding Flowers.

Pictures Of Foxglove Flowers


pictures of foxglove flowers
    pictures
  • (pictural) pictorial: pertaining to or consisting of pictures; "pictorial perspective"; "pictorial records"
  • (picture) a visual representation (of an object or scene or person or abstraction) produced on a surface; "they showed us the pictures of their wedding"; "a movie is a series of images projected so rapidly that the eye integrates them"
  • (picture) visualize: imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind; "I can't see him on horseback!"; "I can see what will happen"; "I can see a risk in this strategy"
  • Represent (someone or something) in a photograph or picture
  • Describe (someone or something) in a certain way
  • Form a mental image of
    foxglove
  • Foxglove (Donna Cavanagh) is a fictional character from the Sandman graphic novels, written by Neil Gaiman. She first appears in Sandman #32 (November 1991), though she is first mentioned by her real name in Sandman #6 (June 1989).
  • A tall Eurasian plant with erect spikes of flowers, typically pinkish-purple or white, shaped like the fingers of gloves. It is a source of the drug digitalis
  • any of several plants of the genus Digitalis
  • Digitalis ( or ) is a genus of about 20 species of herbaceous perennials, shrubs, and biennials that are commonly called foxgloves.
    flowers
  • Induce (a plant) to produce flowers
  • (of a plant) Produce flowers; bloom
  • (flower) bloom: produce or yield flowers; "The cherry tree bloomed"
  • Be in or reach an optimum stage of development; develop fully and richly
  • (flower) a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
  • (flower) reproductive organ of angiosperm plants especially one having showy or colorful parts
pictures of foxglove flowers - Wallmonkeys Peel
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Decals - Fingerhut - Foxglove - 60"H x 40"W Removable Graphic
Wallmonkeys Peel and Stick Wall Decals - Fingerhut - Foxglove - 60"H x 40"W Removable Graphic
WallMonkeys wall graphics are printed on the highest quality re-positionable, self-adhesive fabric paper. Each order is printed in-house and on-demand. WallMonkeys uses premium materials & state-of-the-art production technologies. Our white fabric material is superior to vinyl decals. You can literally see and feel the difference. Our wall graphics apply in minutes and won't damage your paint or leave any mess. PLEASE double check the size of the image you are ordering prior to clicking the 'ADD TO CART' button. Our graphics are offered in a variety of sizes and prices.
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Foxglove
Foxglove
The normal life of a Foxglove plant is two seasons, but sometimes the roots, which are formed of numerous, long, thick fibres, persist and throw up flowers for several seasons. In the first year a rosette of leaves, but no stem, is sent up. In the second year, one or more flowering stems are thrown up, which are from 3 to 4 feet high, though even sometimes more, and bear long spikes of drooping flowers, which bloom in the early summer, though the time of flowering differs much, according to the locality. As a rule the flowers are in perfection in July. As the blossoms on the main stem gradually fall away, smaller lateral shoots are often thrown out from its lower parts, which remain in flower after the principal stem has shed its blossoms. These are also promptly developed if by mischance the central stem sustains any serious injury. The radical leaves are often a foot or more long, contracted at the base into a long, winged footstalk, the wings formed by the lower veins running down into it some distance. They have slightly indented margins and sloping lateral veins, which are a very prominent feature. The flowering stems give off a few leaves, that gradually diminish in size from below upwards. All the leaves are covered with small, simple, unbranched hairs. The flowers are bell-shaped and tubular, 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 inches long, flattened above, inflated beneath, crimson outside above and paler beneath, the lower lip furnished with long hairs inside and marked with numerous dark crimson spots, each surrounded with a white border. The shade of the flowers varies much, especially under cultivation, sometimes the corollas being found perfectly white. In cultivated plants there frequently occurs a malformation, whereby one or two of the uppermost flowers become united, and form an erect, regular, cup-shaped flower, through the centre of which the upper extremity of the stem is more or less prolonged. The Foxglove is a favourite flower of the honey-bee, and is entirely developed by the visits of this insect. For that reason, its tall and stately spikes of flowers are at their best in those sunny, midsummer days when the bees are busiest. The projecting lower lip of the corolla forms an alighting platform for the bee, and as he pushes his way up the bell, to get at the honey which lies in a ring round the seed vessel at the top of the flower, the anthers of the stamens which lie flat on the corolla above him, are rubbed against his back. Going from flower to flower up the spike, he rubs pollen thus from one blossom on to the cleft stigma of another blossom, and thus the flower is fertilized and seeds are able to be produced. The life of each flower, from the time the bud opens till the time it slips off its corolla, is about six days. An almost incredible number of seeds are produced, a single Foxglove plant providing from one to two million seeds to ensure its propagation. It is noteworthy that although the flower is such a favourite with bees and is much visited by other smaller insects, who may be seen taking refuge from cold and wet in its drooping blossoms on chilly evenings, yet no animals will browse upon the plant, perhaps instinctively recognizing its poisonous character. The Foxglove derives its common name from the shape of the flowers resembling the finger of a glove. It was originally Folksglove - the glove of the 'good folk' or fairies, whose favourite haunts were supposed to be in the deep hollows and woody dells, where the Foxglove delights to grow. Folksglove is one of its oldest names, and is mentioned in a list of plants in the time of Edward III. Its Norwegian name, Revbielde (Foxbell), is the only foreign one that alludes to the Fox, though there is a northern legend that bad fairies gave these blossoms to the fox that he might put them on his toes to soften his tread when he prowled among the roosts. The earliest known form of the word is the Anglo-Saxon foxes glofa (the glove of the fox). The mottlings of the blossoms of the Foxglove and the Cowslip, like the spots on butterfly wings and on the tails of peacocks and pheasants, were said to mark where the elves had placed their fingers, and one legend ran that the marks on the Foxglove were a warning sign of the baneful juices secreted by the plant, which in Ireland gain it the popular name of 'Dead Man's Thimbles.' In Scotland, it forms the badge of the Farquharsons, as the Thistle does of the Stuarts. The German name Fingerhut (thimble) suggested to Leonhard Fuchs (the well-known German herbalist of the sixteenth century, after whom the Fuchsia has been named) the employment of the Latin adjective Digitalis (from Digitabulum, a thimble) as a designation for the plant, which, as he remarked, up to the time when he thus named it, in 1542, had had no name in either Greek or Latin. The Foxglove was employed by the old herbalists for various purposes in medicine, most of them wholly without reference to those valuable properti
Foxglove - Digitalis purpurea
Foxglove - Digitalis purpurea
A lone foxglove found growing in land cleared of gorse on Royal Dornoch Golf Club. The foxglove is a biennual plant, flowering only in it's second year. It was such a windy day that I could not capture the whole flower as it was swaying like a pendulum at the tip! Explore 27th June 2007 # 355

pictures of foxglove flowers
pictures of foxglove flowers
Ferry-Morse Perennial Flower Seeds 1052 Foxglove - Mixed Colors 250 Milligram Packet
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