In this class we will focus on some of the theoretical and applied aspects of the biological basis for, and ecological implications of, traditional/local resource management practices (TRM). 

Students will learn about:

1) the diversity of ways in which local and indigenous communities perceive of, use and manage their biological resources

2) how TRM can alter ecological processes, from the level of genes to ecosystems

3) basic field methods and analyses to assess some of the ecological implications of TRM

4) the relationships between TRM, biological conservation, biocultural diversity and ecological restoration. 

Tentative Schedule  

Monday Jan 25 (3 hr)

      Review of TEK/TRM

      Introduction to ecological impacts of TRM

    Problem solving: assessing ecological impacts of TRM at the level of individuals 

Tuesday Jan 26 (3 hr)

    Field (Garden): Measuring ecological impacts of TRM on different life forms

      Problem solving: assessing TRM at the level of plant populations 

Wednesday Jan 27 (3 hr)

    Field (Garden): Experiment: assessing the impacts of harvest and management on the population structure and dynamics  

Thursday Jan 28 (3 hr)

      Presentation of population experiment results

      Problem solving: Assessing TRM at the community level

      Presentation by Nat on species-area curves 

Friday Jan 29 (6+ hrs/full day)

    Field: Experiment: assessing the impacts of land management on plant community diversity and composition [including on medicinal plant diversity and densities] (with Rick Stepp)

Monday Feb 1 (2 hr)

      Community level analyses in Estimate S

      Intro to TRM and protected areas 

Tuesday Feb 2: (3 hrs)

      Presentation of community level experiments

      Intro to conflict management: people and protected areas (Gustavo) 

Wed Feb 4:  (afternoon) (Led by Katie)

Thursday Feb 5: (morning)

    Field (Waipa): MIssion #5 quantifying traditional agricultural systems cont’d 

    Friday Feb 6: (3 hrs)

      Case study and role playing: conflict management and protected areas (Gustavo)

 

Learning Outcomes 

1) Students will be able to describe the principles and diversities of traditional and local resource management (TRM) systems and the relationships between traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and ecological sciences  

2) Students will be able to discuss and provide examples of the ways in which TRM may alter ecological processes at the level of genes, individuals, populations, communities and landscapes  

3) Students will be able to design and carry out basic field methods and analyses to assess some of the ecological implications of TRM 

4) Students will be able to describe some of the links between TEK, TRM and conservation and discuss how TEK and TRM can be applied or integrated into modern conservation and ecological restoration programs.