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Beginning Readers

For Kindergarteners:
 
 
 

Dixie & Taco go to Grandmother's House

Dixie & Taco go to Grandmother's House
(English/Spanish Translation)

Dixie & Taco go to Grandmother's House
(Enfield CT Version)

Dixie & Taco go
to the Zoo

Dixie & Taco go
to the Zoo
(Enfield CT version)


Dixie & Taco go
to the Beach

For First Graders:                        For Preschoolers:
 
 
 
Brook the Fish
(School Edition)

Brook the Fish
(8x8 Edition)

In the Woods
Street Sign
Scavenger Hunt


The Dixie and Taco series is written to help build confidence in Kindergarteners who are just learning to read.  My Kindergartener was forever telling me she couldn’t read when in fact, she did know twenty commonly used words and could read them.  But she was convinced she couldn’t read and therefore didn’t even want to try.  This series grew out of that experience. 

 

Many schools use the Fry Frequently Used Word list to select their high frequency words, or sight words, for the Kindergarten reading curriculum.  I have created a list of words using the Fry top 25 and a few others from the top 100 that seemed to make sense.  For example, since he and his were in the top 25, it only seemed right to include she and her in my list, too.

 

Every time one of the following words is used in the story (a, am, and, are, as, at, be, can, for, from, go, have, he, her, his, I, in, is, it, like, look, me, my, name, no, of, off, on, see, she, that, the, they, this, to, was, we, with, yes, you) it is written in blue as a signal to your child that she/he might know that word.  Each of those words is included in every story. 

 

To personalize the book for your child, I encourage you to highlight, underline or circle other words in the story that your child knows.  As the book gets more and more marked up, your child will begin to feel like a reader.  That confidence may inspire her to tackle new challenges, like math or riding a bike or cleaning her room.  How cool would that be!









Brook the Fish is written for first graders to read on their own.  The majority of the words in the story follow English grammar rules and can be sounded out. 
It also features common consonant blends learned that year and has few compound sentences.  It's about 300 words long and has a little "discuss it with your parents" type moral at the end.


In the Woods was written when my sons, Chip and JJ, were in preschool.  Their speech therapist recommended talking about the pictures in books without actually reading the words to develop my fellas' vocabularies.  I don't know about you, but when I see words, I read them.  So I wrote a book where the words were intended to prompt conversation, rather than tell a story.  


Street Sign Scavenger Hunt is just that, a book where instead of reading a story, your preschooler flips through on a quest to find shapes, colors, letters and numbers.  These are important pre-reading skills that pay dividends later on in their education.  It also helps kids to practice recognizing meaning out of commonly seen items, which is reading at it's most basic form.

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J Monkeys,
Jul 11, 2011, 4:10 PM
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J Monkeys,
Jul 11, 2011, 4:07 PM
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