AUXCOM

 
 AUXCOM, the Auxiliary Communications Specialty course, focuses on radio communications for the Auxiliary and Coast Guard, providing broad knowledge of the fundamental principles underlying communications systems in use by both the Coast Guard and the Auxiliary. You can achieve success as an AUXCOM Specialist by passing a closed book, proctored examination with a score of 75% or better.

Auxiliarists owning or operating Fixed Land, Land Mobile, or DF Radio Facilities must complete the Auxiliary Telecommunications Operator Personal Qualification Standard (TCO PQS) training or must have completed the Communications Specialty (AUXCOM) course prior to 1 August 2008.


This web page was developed to aid the trainees enrolled in Division 22's AUXCOM course.  Offered below is supplemental information, which is not intended to replace the course manual.

 
 Related Courses:

AUXCOM on Blackboard.com  The AUXCOM Course  (Auxiliary Communications) can be taken on Blackboard.com.  If you would like to participate in this online course just contact Dr. Juan Hernandez at e-mail address:  drjhernandez@comcast.netDr. Hernandez will get you a password and user name and register you for the course. [Posted: Oct 2, 2010. Source: Gail Venezio, DIR-T]

Auxiliary Telecommunication Operator Specialty (TCO)
 
AUXCOM Manuals and Power Point Slides:
 
Communications (AUXCOM) - manuals and power point slides (edirectory password required)
 
 
 Course Schedule (2010):
28-Sep     Chapter 1 
5-Oct       Chapter 2 & 3 
12-Oct     Chapter 4 
19-Oct      Chapter 5 
26-Oct      Chapter 6 
2-Nov       No Class- Election Day 
9-Nov       Chapter 7 
16-Nov      Chapter 8
23-Nov      Chapter 9&10 - at Station Eatons Neck
30-Nov      Chapter 11 & Review 
 
 TCO
7-Dec              TCO - Charts TCO- Sign offs
 
14&21 Dec      TCO - Sign offs
 
 
SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION BY CHAPTER:
 
 
 
 Chapter 1: BASIC MARINE RADIOTELEPHONE SYSTEMS NOMENCLATURE AND THEORY
 
 Summary: 
 
This chapter summarizes the major components and principles of radio systems. 
 
 
How an AM radio works: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Principal types of radios on boats:
 
SSB-AM (2-30MHZ) 
  • Used extensively on offshore vessels
  • 150 watt transmission power
  • Range 100 miles+, greater with skywave bounce
  • Notable frequencies:
    • 2182KHZ - distress
    • 2638KHZ- ship to ship in all areas
  • Used for data transmission
 
VHF-FM (156-162 MHZ)
  • used for coastal vessel
  • 25 watt transmission power
  • Range up to 25 miles- limited by radio horizon ( Nautical miles =1.23 X Sqrt (antenna height in feet))
  • Notable channels/frequecies:
    • 16 (156.8MHZ) - distress/calling
    • 09 - non-commercial boat calling - alternate calling channel
    • 70 - digital selective calling
    • 13 - ship to bridge, or ship to ship 
REPEATERS
 
 
 
Chapter 2: VOLUNTARILY INSTALLED MARINE RADIOTELEPHONE STATION REGULATIONS
 
Summary: 
 
This chapter summarizes the most significant rules which should be familiar to all 
licensees and operators of voluntarily installed ship radiotelephone stations.  It covers the regulations and procedures all boaters (non-USCG) need to know about using the radio.
 
Radiotelephone required for:
 
(1) Every power-driven vessel of 20 meters (65') or over in length while navigating;
(2) Every vessel of 100 gross tons and upward carrying one or more passengers for hire while navigating;
(3) Every towing vessel of 26 feet or over in length while navigating; and
(4) Every dredge and floating plant engaged in or near a channel or fairway in operations likely to restrict or affect navigation of other vessels except for an unmanned or intermittently manned floating plant under the control of a dredge.
 
Otherwise, the installation is considered voluntarily installed.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chapter 3: CALLING AND ANSWERING PROCEDURES
 
Summary: 
This chapter covers the procedures used by all boaters (non-USCG) to call or answer a call.  
 
 
 
 
 
 Chapter 4: DISTRESS, URGENCY, AND SAFETY MESSAGE
 
Summary: 

This chapter covers the procedures used by all boaters (non-USCG) for distress (MAYDAY), urgency (PAN-PAN), and safety (Secuite). 

 

 
Making a distress call on a VHF-FM radio:
 
 
 
 
 
 
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