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Obama 44 T Shirts


obama 44 t shirts
    obama 44
  • Barack Hussein Obama II (; born August 4, 1961) is the 44th and current President of the United States. He is the first African American to hold the office.
    t shirts
  • A T-shirt (T shirt or tee) is a shirt which is pulled on over the head to cover most of a person's torso. A T-shirt is usually buttonless and collarless, with a round neck and short sleeves.
  • A short-sleeved casual top, generally made of cotton, having the shape of a T when spread out flat
  • (t-shirt) jersey: a close-fitting pullover shirt
  • (T Shirt (album)) T Shirt is a 1976 album by Loudon Wainwright III. Unlike his earlier records, this (and the subsequent 'Final Exam') saw Wainwright adopt a full blown rock band (Slowtrain) - though there are acoustic songs on T-Shirt, including a talking blues.
obama 44 t shirts - Barack Obama:
Barack Obama: Our 44th President
Barack Obama: Our 44th President
President Barack Obama's early involvement with politics was inspired by his mother's interest in the controversial social issues of her times -- a passion that she passed on to her son. As the first African American editor of the Harvard Law Review, the first African American presidential nominee of a major political party, and eventually the first African American president of the United States, Barack Obama has consistently shattered barriers -- barriers that some people thought could never be overcome.
However, life has not always been easy for President Obama. Born to a Kenyan father and an American mother, Barack grew up in Hawaii and Indonesia, where he faced discrimination and struggles with his own racial identity. Despite these obstacles, Barack persevered and had a successful political career before his historic win in the 2008 presidential election, with his daughters and wife, Michelle, standing firmly by his side. His election has energized a nation, and President Obama will continue to lead the charge for change over the next four years.
This is the children's biography about the forty-fourth president of the United States. Containing up-to-the-minute information, including President Obama's November victory, this is essential reading for every young student of American history.

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hillary at wellesley
hillary at wellesley
Clinton comes home to Wellesley Senator reaches out to nation's young women in an emotional return Clinton says Wellesley taught her to compete Nov. 1: Speaking at her all-female alma mater, Hillary Clinton says, Wellesley College taught her to compete “in the all-boys club of presidential politics." The ‘woman’ card? Nov. 2: Hillary Clinton supporters say male candidates are not just attacking her as frontrunner. NBC's Andrea Mitchell reports. By Elisabeth Bumiller updated 8:17 a.m. ET, Fri., Nov. 2, 2007 WELLESLEY, Mass. - Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton reached out to the nation’s young women in an emotional return on Thursday to her alma mater, Wellesley College, where she told students who had started lining up at 6 a.m. to see her that “in so many ways this all-women’s college prepared me to compete in the all-boys’ club of presidential politics.” It was Mrs. Clinton’s first visit to the school as a presidential candidate, and she chose it as the place to set out on an ambitious drive to attract more women to what she is underscoring as her historic candidacy. Mrs. Clinton’s campaign is increasingly counting on women, who made up 54 percent of the electorate in 2004, to help propel her into the White House. Mrs. Clinton, of New York, made no mention of her opponents’ attacks on her in the Democratic presidential debate in Philadelphia on Tuesday night, or of “The Politics of Pile-on” video with clips from the debate that is now playing on her Web site. But her campaign condemned her rivals’ actions in a new fund-raising appeal sent out on Thursday. The theme of Mrs. Clinton’s remarks at Wellesley was that women have always had to fight discrimination in career advancement, and still do. “So let’s roll up our sleeves and get to work together,” she told the cheering, standing-room-only crowd of more than 1,000 women and a smattering of men in Alumnae Hall at Wellesley, which is one of the historically all-women colleges known as the Seven Sisters and is still limited to female students. “We’re ready to shatter that highest glass ceiling.” Favored by more women than men Although Mrs. Clinton’s own polls over the years show that she has inspired ambivalence, resentment and even loathing among women, she was twice elected to the Senate with big support from them and recent polls show she is viewed more favorably by women than by men. A CBS News poll conducted in mid-October showed that 45 percent of women viewed her favorably, compared with 40 percent of men. Among 18- to 44-year-old women, Mrs. Clinton was viewed favorably by 47 percent. Her Wellesley speech was the kickoff of “Students for Hillary” and a Web site, hillblazers.com, to mobilize support for her on campuses across the country. They are part of a Clinton campaign effort to show that Senator Barack Obama of Illinois, Mrs. Clinton’s closest Democratic opponent and a favorite on college campuses, does not have a lock on the youth vote. They are also seeking to portray her journey to become president as being as inspiring as his. Many of the Wellesley women in the audience wore T-shirts that proclaimed, “I can be president, too.” Mrs. Clinton described her four undergraduate years here in the late 1960s as among the most “exhilarating and formative” of her life, but added that “when I came to Wellesley, I never in a million years could have imagined I would one day return as a candidate for the presidency of the United States.” She emphasized that “back then, women weren’t always taken seriously.” Mrs. Clinton recounted how she had been admitted to both Harvard and Yale Law Schools and was at a Harvard cocktail reception for prospective students when she was introduced to a famous law school professor. “One of my friends said, ‘Professor So-and-So, this is Hillary Rodham, she’s trying to decide between us and our nearest competitor,’” Mrs. Clinton said. “And he looked down at me, and he said: ‘Well, first, we don’t have a nearest competitor. And secondly, we don’t need any more women.’” There were loud gasps from the audience. “So,” Mrs. Clinton said when the gasps had died down, “I decided to go to Yale.” The crowd broke into laughter and applause. Not all stalwart supporters Although Mrs. Clinton was treated to a triumphal welcome as Wellesley’s most famous graduate, and students said much if not most of the campus was pro-Clinton, not everyone in the crowd was a stalwart supporter. Many waiting to enter Alumnae Hall in the long line that snaked under the yellow autumn leaves along College Road said they supported Mr. Obama or were undecided. “You also want to consider, is she the right woman to be the first woman president?” said Savanna Johnson, 21, a Wellesley junior from Bloomington, Ind., who described herself as undecided. But many others said Mrs. Clinton’s words had inspired them. “Hillary made me cry, just hearing her talk about women’s rights and how you can do anything if you put your mind to it,” said
Shirley !
Shirley !
Shirley was in charge of the volunteers who stood at the kerb-side urging a No vote on Prop 8 - I'd hoped to get some Obama Biden posters but she was "All out" As I left I chanced my arm for a T-Shirt but she apologised and told me that any remaining belonged to the volunteers. As we made our way towards our "Automobile" Shirley came after us with a t-shirt. "This one is mine", she said, "But you can take it !" As I sit watching the votes come in on CNN, her campaign for a No vote is slightly behind at 47%. if the "Yes" camp win, it will see same sex marriage banned in the state of California - Descrimination ? Surely not in America.

obama 44 t shirts
obama 44 t shirts
Barack Obama: A Pocket Biography of Our 44th President
Affordable, readable, and indispensable, this pocket biography of Barack Obama allows you to put the story of our 44th President right in your back pocket. Written in a clear and concise style, this biography is accessible for anyone interested in a brief yet thorough introduction to Barack Obama. Steven J. Niven of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University chronicles President Obamas personal biography and his political rise, as well as examining his relationship with race and his role in history. The book also includes an introduction by the world-renowned scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. and a bibliography for further reading to help readers know where to go for more information. In addition, the book includes a transcript of Obamas famous "A More Perfect Union" speech on race in America. This book is the perfect, quick introduction to Barack Obama, Americas 44th President.

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