FLOWER DISPLAY RACKS. DISPLAY RACKS

Flower Display Racks. Plant With Orange Flowers.

Flower Display Racks


flower display racks
    display
  • A collection of objects arranged for public viewing
  • something intended to communicate a particular impression; "made a display of strength"; "a show of impatience"; "a good show of looking interested"
  • attract attention by displaying some body part or posing; of animals
  • A notable or conspicuous demonstration of a particular type of behavior, emotion, or skill
  • expose: to show, make visible or apparent; "The Metropolitan Museum is exhibiting Goya's works this month"; "Why don't you show your nice legs and wear shorter skirts?"; "National leaders will have to display the highest skills of statesmanship"
  • A performance, show, or event intended for public entertainment
    flower
  • Be in or reach an optimum stage of development; develop fully and richly
  • Induce (a plant) to produce flowers
  • reproductive organ of angiosperm plants especially one having showy or colorful parts
  • a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
  • bloom: produce or yield flowers; "The cherry tree bloomed"
  • (of a plant) Produce flowers; bloom
    racks
  • (rack) framework for holding objects
  • A mass of high, thick, fast-moving clouds
  • (rack) single-foot: go at a rack; "the horses single-footed"
  • (rack) rib section of a forequarter of veal or pork or especially lamb or mutton

Mount Auburn Cemetery's Egyptian Revival Gateway
Mount Auburn Cemetery's Egyptian Revival Gateway
© Mount Auburn Cemetery, 1945 photograph by Arthur C. Haskell. Standing at the ceremonial entrance to Mount Auburn is the Egyptian Revival Gateway, designed by Dr. Jacob Bigelow. Originally constructed of wood dusted with stone in 1832, it was rebuilt in 1842 of Quincy granite. Dr. Bigelow created the Gateway to be imposing, enduring, sacred and sublime, and chose the Egyptian style to express these intentions. Examine the inscriptions and details at your leisure. Cars were first permitted into the Cemetery in 1908, and the car gates were added in 1913. Before that, visitors entered in carriages or on foot. Horseback riding was not permitted. Like bicycles today, riding horses had to be left at the Gate. In the alcoves are the literature rack, information display cases, lot diagram map, bird sighting blackboard and the headquarters for gatekeepers and security staff.
Mount Auburn Cemetery's Egyptian Revival Gateway
Mount Auburn Cemetery's Egyptian Revival Gateway
© Mount Auburn Cemetery, October 2007. Standing at the ceremonial entrance to Mount Auburn is the Egyptian Revival Gateway, designed by Dr. Jacob Bigelow. Originally constructed of wood dusted with stone in 1832, it was rebuilt in 1842 of Quincy granite. Dr. Bigelow created the Gateway to be imposing, enduring, sacred and sublime, and chose the Egyptian style to express these intentions. Examine the inscriptions and details at your leisure. Cars were first permitted into the Cemetery in 1908, and the car gates were added in 1913. Before that, visitors entered in carriages or on foot. Horseback riding was not permitted. Like bicycles today, riding horses had to be left at the Gate. In the alcoves are the literature rack, information display cases, lot diagram map, bird sighting blackboard and the headquarters for gatekeepers and security staff.

flower display racks
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