WOODBLOCK FLOOR : WOODBLOCK

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Woodblock Floor


woodblock floor
    woodblock
  • (Woodblocks) A woodblock is essentially a small piece of slit drum made from a single piece of wood and used as a percussion instrument. It is struck with a stick, making a characteristically percussive sound.
  • A block of wood, esp. one from which woodcut prints are made
  • A hollow wooden block used as a percussion instrument
  • A print made in such a way
  • or Woodcut is a form of printing in which a carved woodblock covered with ink is used.
  • Originally the piece of wood from which a woodcut or wood engraving was made. A woodblock print now carries the connotation of a woodcut made from a block of fine-grained wood, which provides a subtle grain pattern and enables the cutter to create more precise lines. top
    floor
  • All the rooms or areas on the same level of a building; a story
  • the inside lower horizontal surface (as of a room, hallway, tent, or other structure); "they needed rugs to cover the bare floors"; "we spread our sleeping bags on the dry floor of the tent"
  • The lower surface of a room, on which one may walk
  • shock: surprise greatly; knock someone's socks off; "I was floored when I heard that I was promoted"
  • a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale; "what level is the office on?"
  • A level area or space used or designed for a particular activity
woodblock floor - Ukiyo-e: An
Ukiyo-e: An Introduction to Japanese Woodblock Prints
Ukiyo-e: An Introduction to Japanese Woodblock Prints
Japanese woodblock prints, or ukiyo-e, occupy a singular position in the lexicon of world art. They enthralled such Western artists as Whistler, Manet, Degas, and van Gogh, and gave rise to a wave of "japonisme" in the salons of Paris, London, and New York that left a lasting impression.

As the successor to previous aristocratic traditions, the ukiyo-e print represents the last flowering of traditional pictorial art before Japan entered the modern era. These "pictures of the floating world" reflected the world of the townspeople of Edo (Tokyo), focusing on the popular entertainments of the day, landscapes of favored scenic spots, and portraits of well-known geisha, kabuki actors, and sumo stars.

The present volume delves into the history of these unique artistic endeavors, tracing their development from the lavish works commissioned by aristocratic patrons in the sixteenth century to their peak in popularity among the rising merchant class of the flourishing future capital. As the story of the genre's blossoming unfolds, Mr. Kobayashi's illuminating commentary on all its varied aspects-styles, artists, engravers, printers, and the demands of an insatiable but fickle public-captures the essence of the art and provides a fascinating glimpse into the culture of old Japan. With the large color plates and numerous detailed close-ups accompanying the text, Ukiyo-e: An Introduction is essential reading for anyone interested in exploring the exotic world of the Japanese print.

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PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Dressing Room - Street Scene on the Ginza-Yedo
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater - Dressing Room - Street Scene on the Ginza-Yedo
Street Scene on the Ginza-Yedo, by artist Ando Hiroshige circa 1856-1868, is one of six Japanese woodblock prints at Fallingwater given as gifts from Frank Lloyd Wright to the Kaufmann family. On the back of the original mat is the inscription, "to Junior: at Taliesin Aug 14 – 51. Over his lifetime, Wright amassed one of the largest collections of Japanese prints worldwide, rivaling that of the Japanese imperial family. Wright was more than just a collector, but a dealer of Japanese art, which ironically made him more money than his architectural commissions. Fallingwater's Dressing Room, on the second floor, is sometimes referred to as Edgar Kaufmann Sr's Study or Edgar Kaufmann Sr's bedroom. Fallingwater, sometimes referred to as the Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence or just the Kaufmann Residence, located within a 5,100-acre nature reserve 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built between 1936 and 1939. Built over a 30-foot flowing waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the house served as a vacation retreat for the Kaufmann family including patriarch, Edgar Kaufmann Sr., was a successful Pittsburgh businessman and president of Kaufmann's Department Store, and his son, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., who studied architecture briefly under Wright. Wright collaborated with staff engineers Mendel Glickman and William Wesley Peters on the structural design, and assigned his apprentice, Robert Mosher, as his permanent on-site representative throughout construction. Despite frequent conflicts between Wright, Kaufmann, and the construction contractor, the home and guesthouse were finally constructed at a cost of $155,000. Fallingwater was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. It was listed among the Smithsonian's 28 Places to See Before You Die. In a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." In 2007, Fallingwater was ranked #29 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #74001781 (1974)
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater Master Bedroom - Horikiri No Hanashobu
PA - Mill Run: Fallingwater Master Bedroom - Horikiri No Hanashobu
Horikiri No Hanashobu (Iris Garden at Horikiri), by artist Ando Hiroshige in 1857, is one of six Japanese woodblock prints at Fallingwater given as gifts from Frank Lloyd Wright to the Kaufmann family. Over his lifetime, Wright amassed one of the largest collections of Japanese prints worldwide, rivaling that of the Japanese imperial family. Wright was more than just a collector, but a dealer of Japanese art, which ironically made him more money than his architectural commissions. The Fallingwater master bedroom, at the center of the second floor, was Liliane Kaufmann's bedroom. The balcony from the master bedroom forms the external highlight of the house. Fallingwater, sometimes referred to as the Edgar J. Kaufmann Sr. Residence or just the Kaufmann Residence, located within a 5,100-acre nature reserve 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh, was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and built between 1936 and 1939. Built over a 30-foot flowing waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, the house served as a vacation retreat for the Kaufmann family including patriarch, Edgar Kaufmann Sr., was a successful Pittsburgh businessman and president of Kaufmann's Department Store, and his son, Edgar Kaufmann, Jr., who studied architecture briefly under Wright. Wright collaborated with staff engineers Mendel Glickman and William Wesley Peters on the structural design, and assigned his apprentice, Robert Mosher, as his permanent on-site representative throughout construction. Despite frequent conflicts between Wright, Kaufmann, and the construction contractor, the home and guesthouse were finally constructed at a cost of $155,000. Fallingwater was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1966. It was listed among the Smithsonian's 28 Places to See Before You Die. In a 1991 poll of members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), it was voted "the best all-time work of American architecture." In 2007, Fallingwater was ranked #29 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list. National Register #74001781 (1974)

woodblock floor
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