BLINDS FOR LARGE WINDOWS. LARGE WINDOWS

Blinds for large windows. Aquarium canopy hood. Hunter douglas bamboo blinds

Blinds For Large Windows


blinds for large windows
    windows
  • (trademark) an operating system with a graphical user interface
  • A computer operating system with a graphical user interface
  • (window) a transparent opening in a vehicle that allow vision out of the sides or back; usually is capable of being opened
  • (window) a framework of wood or metal that contains a glass windowpane and is built into a wall or roof to admit light or air
    blinds
  • Deprive (someone) of understanding, judgment, or perception
  • Confuse or overawe someone with something difficult to understand
  • window coverings, especially vertical blinds, wood blinds, roller blinds, pleated blinds
  • The blinds are forced bets posted by players to the left of the dealer button in flop-style poker games. The number of blinds is usually two, but can be one or three.
  • Cause (someone) to be unable to see, permanently or temporarily
  • A window blind is a type of window covering which is made with slats of fabric, wood, plastic or metal that adjust by rotating from an open position to a closed position by allowing slats to overlap. A roller blind does not have slats but comprises a single piece of material.
    large
  • at a distance, wide of something (as of a mark)
  • Of considerable or relatively great size, extent, or capacity
  • above average in size or number or quantity or magnitude or extent; "a large city"; "set out for the big city"; "a large sum"; "a big (or large) barn"; "a large family"; "big businesses"; "a big expenditure"; "a large number of newspapers"; "a big group of scientists"; "large areas of the world"
  • a garment size for a large person
  • Of greater size than the ordinary, esp. with reference to a size of clothing or to the size of a packaged commodity
  • Pursuing an occupation or commercial activity on a significant scale
blinds for large windows - Metal Man
Metal Man AB7800SG Black 9-13 Shade Industrial Large Window Auto Darkening Welding Helmet
Metal Man AB7800SG Black 9-13 Shade Industrial Large Window Auto Darkening Welding Helmet
METAL MAN Industrial Grade AB7800SG Black, 9-13 variable shade auto darkening welding helmet with large window 3.82' x 2.44' viewing area. Features German made lens with grind mode, 1/25,000 second darkening speed, 4 arc sensors, low amperage TIG to 2 amps, dial sensitivity and delay adjustments, auto on/off, solar powered plus 2 replacable CR2450 batteries, UV/IR up to shade 16, ANSI and CSA approval, 5 point adjustable ratchet style head gear with large 2/3 head gear diameter removable/ washable sweat band. Toll free welder help line at 888-762-4045, 1 year liminted warranty.Big window 3.82' x 2.44 viewing area with 9-13 variable shade controlIndustrial grade German lens with auto on/off, solar powered with replaceable batteries, 4 independent arc sensors that darkens in 1/25,000 secondsSensitivity and delay adjustments with grind modeLow amperage TIG to 2 amps5 point adjustable head gear with large removable/wwashable sweat band

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Messiah Home for Children
Messiah Home for Children
University Heights, The Bronx, New York City, New York, United States Summary This impressive Bronx building was constructed in 1905-08 for the Messiah Home for Children, to serve as an orphanage for young children. This organization, begun in 1888, cared for poor children with one or no parents, on either a permanent or temporary basis. Originally housed in modest accommodations in Manhattan, the group needed larger facilities by the turn of the century. In 1902, Standard Oil magnate Henry H. Rogers donated a large property in the Bronx, previously the estate of Lewis G. Morris. Shortly afterward, Rogers also underwrote the construction of this building, designed by the prominent Boston architect Charles Brigham. Brigham designed a large and elaborate Jacobethan Revival style structure replete with towers and turrets, numerous dormers including some with elaborately curved Flemish gables, and many deep-set, transomed windows in a variety of shapes and sizes. The Messiah Home owned this building until 1920 (although they had previously moved their operations to Spring Valley, New York), and the facility was sold to the Salvation Army to be used as a training center. They occupied the building until 1975, after which it stood vacant for several years. In 1978, it was taken over by New York City for use as the South Bronx Job Corps Center. After extensive interior and exterior restoration, this grand building with its complex design has once again become an important focus for the neighborhood and serves as a reminder of that period when the Borough of the Bronx was home to many important institutions. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS The West Bronx Through the mid-nineteenth century, most of the land between the Bronx and the Harlem Rivers was still rural, with farms, an occasional village, or estate on the hilly landscape. By the 1840s and 1850s, the establishment of some industry, as well as the laying of railroad tracks began to attract more population to the region, and villages such as Morrisania, Melrose, Fordham, Tremont, and Morris Heights began. Improved roads and transportation led a number of wealthy New Yorkers to build summer residences here. In 1874, this area was annexed to New York City (becoming known as the Annexed District) and development began in earnest. As streets and parks were laid out and the Third Avenue Elevated Line was extended (first to 132nd Street and then to the Tremont section), farms and estates began to give way to housing. By the late 1890s, the North Side, as the Bronx was then commonly called, was a prosperous suburb of Manhattan, with many single-family homes. Numerous institutions were also attracted to the area by the availability of cheaper and more abundant land, as well as by the ever-improving transit system, for rapid access to Manhattan. Two such organizations which made the move to the Bronx during this period were New York University, which built a new campus in University Heights, and the American Female Guardian Society which moved from Manhattan in 1902. After consolidation in 1898, when an expanded district joined with New York City and became the Borough of the Bronx, the area was on its way to becoming the densely populated section that it is today. The Messiah Home The Messiah Home for Children was founded in 1885 out of concern for the needs of the city's poor children. As stated in the group's constitution: Our object is to provide a home for minor children who are dependent upon working mothers for their support; or who are orphaned and destitute, and who need temporary shelter on account of the sickness of their parents or other exigencies; to educate and train the children committed permanently to our care, and to assist them in obtaining situations, by which they may maintain themselves as honest and useful members of the community. The Messiah Home was originally located in a building at 4 Rutherford Place, facing Stuyvesant Square, in Manhattan, serving an ever increasing number of children (its population growing from 11 to 30 in 1888 alone). Children between the ages of two and ten years were accepted into the home, and parents (if they were living) were expected to contribute toward their board and upkeep if possible. Children could be placed in the home on either a temporary or permanent basis, and parents were allowed to visit once each month. The home provided care and shelter, as well as religion, general education, and training for future employment. The Messiah Home was run by a Board of Managers, consisting primarily of wealthy women concerned with helping those less fortunate than themselves. In 1888, the Board's president was Mrs. H.H. Rogers, wife of Henry H. Rogers, who was one of the industrialists responsible for the development of Standard Oil Company. Mr. Rogers also served on the Messiah Home's Board of Advisors. Over the course of many years, this organization became a very important project for the famil
Messiah Home for Children
Messiah Home for Children
Montgomery Avenue, University Heights, The Bronx, New York City, New York, United States of America Summary This impressive Bronx building was constructed in 1905-08 for the Messiah Home for Children, to serve as an orphanage for young children. This organization, begun in 1888, cared for poor children with one or no parents, on either a permanent or temporary basis. Originally housed in modest accommodations in Manhattan, the group needed larger facilities by the turn of the century. In 1902, Standard Oil magnate Henry H. Rogers donated a large property in the Bronx, previously the estate of Lewis G. Morris. Shortly afterward, Rogers also underwrote the construction of this building, designed by the prominent Boston architect Charles Brigham. Brigham designed a large and elaborate Jacobethan Revival style structure replete with towers and turrets, numerous dormers including some with elaborately curved Flemish gables, and many deep-set, transomed windows in a variety of shapes and sizes. The Messiah Home owned this building until 1920 (although they had previously moved their operations to Spring Valley, New York), and the facility was sold to the Salvation Army to be used as a training center. They occupied the building until 1975, after which it stood vacant for several years. In 1978, it was taken over by New York City for use as the South Bronx Job Corps Center. After extensive interior and exterior restoration, this grand building with its complex design has once again become an important focus for the neighborhood and serves as a reminder of that period when the Borough of the Bronx was home to many important institutions. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS The West Bronx Through the mid-nineteenth century, most of the land between the Bronx and the Harlem Rivers was still rural, with farms, an occasional village, or estate on the hilly landscape. By the 1840s and 1850s, the establishment of some industry, as well as the laying of railroad tracks began to attract more population to the region, and villages such as Morrisania, Melrose, Fordham, Tremont, and Morris Heights began. Improved roads and transportation led a number of wealthy New Yorkers to build summer residences here. In 1874, this area was annexed to New York City (becoming known as the Annexed District) and development began in earnest. As streets and parks were laid out and the Third Avenue Elevated Line was extended (first to 132nd Street and then to the Tremont section), farms and estates began to give way to housing. By the late 1890s, the North Side, as the Bronx was then commonly called, was a prosperous suburb of Manhattan, with many single-family homes. Numerous institutions were also attracted to the area by the availability of cheaper and more abundant land, as well as by the ever-improving transit system, for rapid access to Manhattan. Two such organizations which made the move to the Bronx during this period were New York University, which built a new campus in University Heights, and the American Female Guardian Society which moved from Manhattan in 1902. After consolidation in 1898, when an expanded district joined with New York City and became the Borough of the Bronx, the area was on its way to becoming the densely populated section that it is today. The Messiah Home The Messiah Home for Children was founded in 1885 out of concern for the needs of the city's poor children. As stated in the group's constitution: Our object is to provide a home for minor children who are dependent upon working mothers for their support; or who are orphaned and destitute, and who need temporary shelter on account of the sickness of their parents or other exigencies; to educate and train the children committed permanently to our care, and to assist them in obtaining situations, by which they may maintain themselves as honest and useful members of the community. The Messiah Home was originally located in a building at 4 Rutherford Place, facing Stuyvesant Square, in Manhattan, serving an ever increasing number of children (its population growing from 11 to 30 in 1888 alone). Children between the ages of two and ten years were accepted into the home, and parents (if they were living) were expected to contribute toward their board and upkeep if possible. Children could be placed in the home on either a temporary or permanent basis, and parents were allowed to visit once each month. The home provided care and shelter, as well as religion, general education, and training for future employment. The Messiah Home was run by a Board of Managers, consisting primarily of wealthy women concerned with helping those less fortunate than themselves. In 1888, the Board's president was Mrs. H.H. Rogers, wife of Henry H. Rogers, who was one of the industrialists responsible for the development of Standard Oil Company. Mr. Rogers also served on the Messiah Home's Board of Advisors. Over the course of many years, this organization became a very i

blinds for large windows
blinds for large windows
Keys U See Large Print US English USB Wired Keyboard - Yellow Keys with Large Black Print Characters / Letters (US English)
With letter characters larger than usual and command keys in a larger bolder font, these high-contrast keys can really help those who have trouble seeing keyboards. Perfect for schools, special needs departments and libraries, as well as companies. This Large Print, Big Keys Keyboard has been designed specifically for those with conditions that cause visual impairment or low vision, such as macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and cataracts. These large print, big key keyboards are perfect for anyone who has a hard time seeing the existing commands on their keyboards. With a bigger and bolder black typeface on vividly bright yellow keys, the keys are easier to see. Additional keys (hot keys) have been added to the keyboard to allow for easier access to commonly used commands, such as searching and accessing e-mail and the Internet and energy saving commands: wake and sleep, when you need to leave your computer on, but won't be using it. These big, bold keys will have you using the computer, with more accurate keystrokes for a more enjoyable time.

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