PLANTS AND FLOWERS INFORMATION. FLOWERS INFORMATION

PLANTS AND FLOWERS INFORMATION. PETALS A FLORIST.

Plants And Flowers Information


plants and flowers information
    information
  • knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
  • formal accusation of a crime
  • A formal criminal charge lodged with a court or magistrate by a prosecutor without the aid of a grand jury
  • Facts provided or learned about something or someone
  • What is conveyed or represented by a particular arrangement or sequence of things
  • a message received and understood
    flowers
  • Induce (a plant) to produce flowers
  • (flower) reproductive organ of angiosperm plants especially one having showy or colorful parts
  • (flower) a plant cultivated for its blooms or blossoms
  • Be in or reach an optimum stage of development; develop fully and richly
  • (of a plant) Produce flowers; bloom
  • (flower) bloom: produce or yield flowers; "The cherry tree bloomed"
    plants
  • (plant) buildings for carrying on industrial labor; "they built a large plant to manufacture automobiles"
  • Place a seed, bulb, or plant in (a place) to grow
  • Place (a seed, bulb, or plant) in the ground so that it can grow
  • Bury (someone)
  • (plant) put or set (seeds, seedlings, or plants) into the ground; "Let's plant flowers in the garden"
  • (plant) implant: fix or set securely or deeply; "He planted a knee in the back of his opponent"; "The dentist implanted a tooth in the gum"
plants and flowers information - EasyBloom 1000
EasyBloom 1000 Plant Sensor
EasyBloom 1000 Plant Sensor
The EasyBloom Plant Sensor helps you grow a perfect garden without the guesswork. Is this corner too hot, too dark, or too dry? Instead of wondering which plants will thrive where, know for sure with EasyBloom. This ingenious in-ground sensor reads and analyzes growing conditions in specific spots inside your home or yard, including sunlight, temperature, humidity, soil moisture and drainage. It even uses the same technology used on NASA's Mars mission to measure the soil. Plug it into your computer and watch as it turns readings into recommendations, listing plants sure to flourish in your exact environment. Narrow your search more by specifying desired bloom color or season, plant height, drought tolerant, deer resistant, and other features. EasyBloom puts expert plant help in the palm of your hand: * Access the EasyBloom database of 5,000+ plants (developed with the largest growers of plants and flowers). * Find plants to thrive in every area of your home and garden, based on algorithms developed by leading plant horticulturalists and botanists * End the discouraging cycle of trial-and-error planting. * Diagnose ailing plants and bring them back to health. * Keep inventory of your own plants for one-click plant care. The ultimate "why didn't someone think of that sooner" invention, EasyBloom is like having your own personal team of botanists on-call around the clock. The result? You spend a lot less time working in your garden, and a lot more time enjoying it. A perfect gift for novices to experienced gardeners, EasyBloom is completely reusable and works with your PC or Mac.

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Yellow Tulip
Yellow Tulip
Center of a Tulip, my favorite flower. INFORMATION ON THE TULIP: Tulipa commonly called Tulip is a genus of about 100 species of bulbous flowering plants in the family Liliaceae. The native range of the species include southern Europe, north Africa, and Asia from Anatolia and Iran in the east to northeast of China. The centre of diversity of the genus is in the Pamir and Hindu Kush mountains and the steppes of Kazakhstan. A number of species and many hybrid cultivars are grown in gardens, used as pot plants or as fresh cut flowers. The species are perennials from bulbs, the tunicate bulbs are often produced on the ends of stolons and covered with glabrous to variously hairy papery coverings. The species include short low growing plants to tall upright plants, growing from 10 to 70 centimeters (4–27 in) tall. Plants with typically 2 to 6 leaves, with some species having up to 12 leaves. The cauline foliage is strap-shaped, waxy-coated, usually light to medium green and alternately arranged. The blades are somewhat fleshy and linear to oblong in shape. Although tulips are associated with Holland, both the flower and its name originated in the Ottoman Empire. The tulip is actually not a Dutch flower as many people tend to believe. The tulip, or "Lale" (a Persian word) as it is called in Turkey, is a flower indigenous to Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey and other parts of Central Asia. A Dutch ambassador in Turkey in the 16th century, who was also a great floral enthusiast, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, got their very names because of their Persian origins. Tulips were brought to Europe in the 16th century; the word tulip, which earlier in English appeared in such forms as tulipa or tulipant, entered the language by way of French tulipe and its obsolete form tulipan or by way of Modern Latin tulipa, from Ottoman Turkish tulbend, "muslin, gauze." (The English word turban, first recorded in English in the 16th century, can also be traced to Ottoman Turkish tulbend.) The Turkish word for gauze, with which turbans can be wrapped, seems to have been used for the flower because a fully opened tulip was thought to resemble a turban. Tulips originate from mountainous areas with temperate climates and need a period of cool dormancy. They do best in climates with long cool springs and early summers, but they are often grown as spring blooming annual plantings in warmer areas of the world. The bulbs are typically planted in late summer and fall, normally from 10 to 20 cm (4 to 8 in.) deep, depending of the type planted, in well draining soils. In parts of the world that do not have long cool springs and early summers, the bulbs are often planted up to 12 inches deep, this provides some protection from the heat of summer and tends to force the plants to regenerate one large bulb each year instead of many smaller non blooming ones. This can extend the usefulness of the plants in warmer areas a few years but not stave off the degradation in bulb size and eventual death of the plants. (Source: Wikipedia)
Yellow Tulip Up Close
Yellow Tulip Up Close
A Tulip, my favorite flower. INFORMATION ON THE TULIP: Tulipa commonly called Tulip is a genus of about 100 species of bulbous flowering plants in the family Liliaceae. The native range of the species include southern Europe, north Africa, and Asia from Anatolia and Iran in the east to northeast of China. The centre of diversity of the genus is in the Pamir and Hindu Kush mountains and the steppes of Kazakhstan. A number of species and many hybrid cultivars are grown in gardens, used as pot plants or as fresh cut flowers. The species are perennials from bulbs, the tunicate bulbs are often produced on the ends of stolons and covered with glabrous to variously hairy papery coverings. The species include short low growing plants to tall upright plants, growing from 10 to 70 centimeters (4–27 in) tall. Plants with typically 2 to 6 leaves, with some species having up to 12 leaves. The cauline foliage is strap-shaped, waxy-coated, usually light to medium green and alternately arranged. The blades are somewhat fleshy and linear to oblong in shape. Although tulips are associated with Holland, both the flower and its name originated in the Ottoman Empire. The tulip is actually not a Dutch flower as many people tend to believe. The tulip, or "Lale" (a Persian word) as it is called in Turkey, is a flower indigenous to Iran, Afghanistan, Turkey and other parts of Central Asia. A Dutch ambassador in Turkey in the 16th century, who was also a great floral enthusiast, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, got their very names because of their Persian origins. Tulips were brought to Europe in the 16th century; the word tulip, which earlier in English appeared in such forms as tulipa or tulipant, entered the language by way of French tulipe and its obsolete form tulipan or by way of Modern Latin tulipa, from Ottoman Turkish tulbend, "muslin, gauze." (The English word turban, first recorded in English in the 16th century, can also be traced to Ottoman Turkish tulbend.) The Turkish word for gauze, with which turbans can be wrapped, seems to have been used for the flower because a fully opened tulip was thought to resemble a turban. Tulips originate from mountainous areas with temperate climates and need a period of cool dormancy. They do best in climates with long cool springs and early summers, but they are often grown as spring blooming annual plantings in warmer areas of the world. The bulbs are typically planted in late summer and fall, normally from 10 to 20 cm (4 to 8 in.) deep, depending of the type planted, in well draining soils. In parts of the world that do not have long cool springs and early summers, the bulbs are often planted up to 12 inches deep, this provides some protection from the heat of summer and tends to force the plants to regenerate one large bulb each year instead of many smaller non blooming ones. This can extend the usefulness of the plants in warmer areas a few years but not stave off the degradation in bulb size and eventual death of the plants. (Source: Wikipedia)

plants and flowers information
plants and flowers information
Hirt's Rare Haunting White Bat Plant - Tacca - Exotic Houseplant
Haunting, possibly even evil is this fascinating plant displaying the rudiments of a bat. Large whiskered face is surrounded by luscious green leaves and given the right conditions. Makes a nice house plant, too. It is also called the "Devil's Plant".
Proper name: Tacca integrifolia. If you like to collect and grow bizarre plants then this family of plants is for you. The rare White Bat Plant produces a sinister looking flower that looks like a bat in flight. The center of the flower develops a small bat face. These plants are native to India, Malaysia and some of the islands in the Indo-Pacific region.
Proper name: Tacca integrifolia
The starter plant you will receive is growing in a 3" pot.

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