Get to the Point

Speech Project 3 from the Competent Communication Manual


Introduction:

As you plan a speech, you must be absolutely clear about what you want the audience to do or know at the end of your talk.Your speech must have a purpose.Once you know your purpose, all other decisions relating to the speech – what information to include, organization and delivery – are easy to make, since you will measure them against their helpfulness in achieving your purpose.

Executive Summary:

Every speech must have a general and specific purpose.A general purpose is to inform, to persuade, to entertain or to inspire.A specific purpose is what you want the audience to do after listening to your speech.Once you have established your general and specific purposes, you’ll find it easy to organize your speech.You’ll also have more confidence, which makes you more convincing, enthusiastic and sincere.Of course, the better organized the speech is, the more likely it is to achieve your purpose.

Objectives:

  • Select a speech topic and determine its general and specific purposes.
  • Organize the speech in a manner that best achieves those purposes.
  • Ensure the beginning, body and conclusion reinforce those purposes.
  • Project sincerity and conviction and control any nervousness you may feel.
  • Strive not to use notes.

Time: Five to seven minutes

For more details on this speech project, see the Competent Communication Manual from Toastmasters International.


The Competent Communication Manual

You may be more comfortable communicating by electronic mail or telephone than in person. Speaking to large or small groups, or even one-to-one, may intimidate or frighten you.Yet good communication skills are vital if you want to be successful. Corporate leaders say that the ability to communicate well orally is one of the most important skills their recruiters look for in job candidates. Businesses want people who express themselves clearly and confidently, and are persuasive and comfortable communicating with a wide range of people, from top executives to assembly-line workers.